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Re: [John Muir Trail] Disposable rain gear

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  • Kim Fishburn
    I absolutely love my ULA Rair Wrap but I can t find anything for my upper body I like so I just go with a poncho most of the time.I tried the rain jacket the
    Message 1 of 24 , Jan 30, 2012
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      I absolutely love my ULA Rair Wrap but I can't find anything for my upper body I like so I just go with a poncho most of the time.I tried the rain jacket the backpackinglight.com used to sell but I still sweat too much.


      From: Bronco <dawgbronco@...>
      To: johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com
      Sent: Monday, January 30, 2012 12:13 AM
      Subject: [John Muir Trail] Disposable rain gear

       
      I found a disposable rain poncho (2.8 oz.) at Sports Authority today. Heavier than the paper-thin, vinyl crap. Dri Duck brand. I have yet to get wet on my July/August ventures into the Sierras so I think I'm going to lighten up this year. Any thoughts?



    • John Ladd
      Just a few considerations before you decide to substitute a poncho for a rain jacket Rain and wind tend to come together and poncho s can turn into flapping
      Message 2 of 24 , Jan 30, 2012
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        Just a few considerations before you decide to substitute a poncho for a rain jacket

        Rain and wind tend to come together and poncho's can turn into flapping sails in the wind.  I got blown off my feet once on a ridgeline when I used a poncho. Raincover on my pack was the main problem - turned into a spinnaker, but the poncho didn't help.

        Rain jacket combined with an insulation layer can keep you warm in windy cold weather (even if not raining).

        If your main insulation layer is down and it lacks a highly rain-resistant shell, the inevitable leaks around a poncho can make it lose a lot of its loft.  (Less of a problem with fleece or Primaloft)

        Rain gear worn in a sleeping bag acts as a vapor barrier and can add a lot of warmth if you get an unexpected cold snap.

        That all said, in a warm, gentle rain a poncho obviously has better ventilation,

        John Curran Ladd
        1616 Castro Street
        San Francisco, CA  94114-3707
        415-648-9279


        On Sun, Jan 29, 2012 at 10:13 PM, Bronco <dawgbronco@...> wrote:
         

        I found a disposable rain poncho (2.8 oz.) at Sports Authority today. Heavier than the paper-thin, vinyl crap. Dri Duck brand. I have yet to get wet on my July/August ventures into the Sierras so I think I'm going to lighten up this year. Any thoughts?


      • M L
        We used DriDucks rain jackets last summer on the JMT. Got 2 days of rain, including hail and wind. The jackets weigh a little more and cost a bit more than
        Message 3 of 24 , Jan 30, 2012
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          We used DriDucks rain jackets last summer on the JMT.  Got 2 days of rain, including hail and wind.  The jackets weigh a little more and cost a bit more than the poncho.  But they worked very well for us.  And they are still in good condition for future use.  They are more breathable than the standard laminate jackets, and a lot lighter and cheaper than those.  We didn't bring the pants, and didn't miss them, even in continuous rain.  Our nylon hiking pants seem to dry pretty quickly from body heat.  And just keeping the torso dry seemed to keep us warm enough.

          The material used in DriDucks is also apparently used in disposable hazmat suits and the like.

          Mina


          To: johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com
          From: dawgbronco@...
          Date: Mon, 30 Jan 2012 06:13:30 +0000
          Subject: [John Muir Trail] Disposable rain gear

           
          I found a disposable rain poncho (2.8 oz.) at Sports Authority today. Heavier than the paper-thin, vinyl crap. Dri Duck brand. I have yet to get wet on my July/August ventures into the Sierras so I think I'm going to lighten up this year. Any thoughts?


        • Don Amundson
          Some added thoughts to my first response. A consideration when choosing rain gear can be as much the moisture created within as protection from the
          Message 4 of 24 , Jan 30, 2012
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            Some added thoughts to my first response.  A consideration when choosing rain gear can be as much the moisture created within as protection from the rain/snow/sleet/hail.  Even when wearing a poncho I can get pretty warm and start to sweat.  I've hiked with others who preferred full rain gear at the end of the day they were pretty "damp" from trapped moisture.  Breathability, or lack thereof is usually part of any raingear discussion. It's pretty hard to make something waterproof and breathable at the same time.  That's why a poncho is preferred by some.  Wind can make a poncho a flapping nuisance if you don't have side snaps or take the time to tie it down around your waist with a belt or cord. My Driducks poncho (the heavy one)  fits nicely over the top of my pack to protect it--I've never used a pack cover.  Those I've hiked with have always seemed to get wet somewhere using a pack cover. 
            It has always amused me to watch someone getting their rain gear out and "dressing for the drops."  1. Pack off  2.  Get pack cover and rain clothing out of pack 3. Put on pack cover and rain gear 4. Put on pack and start hiking again.  I like to 1. Pull out poncho from side pocket without removing pack  2. Throw poncho over the head, adjust and keep hiking. OK, I don't always have the poncho in the side pocket and have to take the pack off.
            Having said all this the bottom line is there have very few times I've ever had to do this.  I like a 3oz. wind shirt with a water repellant coating that keeps me warm on cold mornings, handles light rain and works as added sleeping layer when needed. A poncho is more a security blanket for me.  If if looks or is getting bad weather wise I prefer finding a flat spot and pitching my shelter and waiting for the wet stuff to pass.


            To: johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com
            From: johnladd@...
            Date: Mon, 30 Jan 2012 07:26:07 -0800
            Subject: Re: [John Muir Trail] Disposable rain gear

             
            Just a few considerations before you decide to substitute a poncho for a rain jacket

            Rain and wind tend to come together and poncho's can turn into flapping sails in the wind.  I got blown off my feet once on a ridgeline when I used a poncho. Raincover on my pack was the main problem - turned into a spinnaker, but the poncho didn't help.

            Rain jacket combined with an insulation layer can keep you warm in windy cold weather (even if not raining).

            If your main insulation layer is down and it lacks a highly rain-resistant shell, the inevitable leaks around a poncho can make it lose a lot of its loft.  (Less of a problem with fleece or Primaloft)

            Rain gear worn in a sleeping bag acts as a vapor barrier and can add a lot of warmth if you get an unexpected cold snap.

            That all said, in a warm, gentle rain a poncho obviously has better ventilation,

            John Curran Ladd
            1616 Castro Street
            San Francisco, CA  94114-3707
            415-648-9279



            On Sun, Jan 29, 2012 at 10:13 PM, Bronco <dawgbronco@...> wrote:
             
            I found a disposable rain poncho (2.8 oz.) at Sports Authority today. Heavier than the paper-thin, vinyl crap. Dri Duck brand. I have yet to get wet on my July/August ventures into the Sierras so I think I'm going to lighten up this year. Any thoughts?




          • Robert
            Do you know what the brand is ? I like the sounds of a 2.8 oz. poncho! I like Dri Ducks as well, but I agree with Don A. on picking your poison on which way
            Message 5 of 24 , Jan 30, 2012
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              Do you know what the brand is ? I like the sounds of a 2.8 oz. poncho! I like Dri Ducks as well, but I agree with Don A. on 'picking your poison' on which way you want to get wet, from sweat on the inside or from a little misting from blow in rain. I'll take a little misting and a properly strapped poncho! I too have had good luck with not getting wet with a light bungee style cord that wraps around my pack and my body.

              --- In johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com, "Bronco" <dawgbronco@...> wrote:
              >
              > I found a disposable rain poncho (2.8 oz.) at Sports Authority today. Heavier than the paper-thin, vinyl crap. Dri Duck brand. I have yet to get wet on my July/August ventures into the Sierras so I think I'm going to lighten up this year. Any thoughts?
              >
            • Bronco
              Wow! It s breathable, too. The DriDucks® Poncho is constructed from an ultralight waterproof breathable non-woven polypropylene construction. The patented
              Message 6 of 24 , Jan 30, 2012
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                Wow! It's breathable, too.
                "The DriDucks® Poncho is constructed from an ultralight waterproof breathable non-woven polypropylene construction. The patented bi-laminate technology with "welded" waterproof seams and unmatched sweat-free breathability is a great value in affordable rain wear."

                --- In johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com, "Bronco" <dawgbronco@...> wrote:
                >
                > I found a disposable rain poncho (2.8 oz.) at Sports Authority today. Heavier than the paper-thin, vinyl crap. Dri Duck brand. I have yet to get wet on my July/August ventures into the Sierras so I think I'm going to lighten up this year. Any thoughts?
                >
              • Jeremy foltz
                http://www.froggtoggsoutlet.com/driducksponcho.html Is this the Poncho that you are referring to? 2.8 oz? I am going to get rid of my rain jacket and pants
                Message 7 of 24 , Jan 30, 2012
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                  http://www.froggtoggsoutlet.com/driducksponcho.html

                  Is this the Poncho that you are referring to?  2.8 oz?
                  I am going to get rid of my rain jacket and pants altogether if this works out.      

                    




                • Bronco
                  That one looks heavier. Try this site for the 2.8 oz poncho... http://www.froggtoggsoutlet.com/drempodd.html I got mine at Sports Authority.
                  Message 8 of 24 , Jan 30, 2012
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                    That one looks heavier. Try this site for the 2.8 oz poncho...

                    http://www.froggtoggsoutlet.com/drempodd.html

                    I got mine at Sports Authority.

                    --- In johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com, Jeremy foltz <jdarwinfoltz@...> wrote:
                    >
                    > http://www.froggtoggsoutlet.com/driducksponcho.html
                    >
                    > Is this the Poncho that you are referring to? 2.8 oz?
                    > I am going to get rid of my rain jacket and pants altogether if this works
                    > out.
                    >
                  • judy
                    O2 Cycling Rain Jacket (and pants) is another choice along this line--like Frog Toggs only a bit lighter. I ve used them on the JMT for several years in some
                    Message 9 of 24 , Jan 31, 2012
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                      O2 Cycling Rain Jacket (and pants) is another choice along this line--like Frog Toggs only a bit lighter. I've used them on the JMT for several years in some downpours and stay pretty dry. Great as just a windbreak or an extra layer at night. They do rip and the coating wears off, but I get about 2 years out of jacket (more with pants as I don't use them as much). Easy to field repair with duct tape. Looks like it might be pretty flammable. Only comes in bright yellow!

                      http://www.amazon.com/O2-1111-Cycling-Rain-Jacket/dp/B001KU4TMY

                      JP
                    • Bronco
                      Just got a good tip from Mike Clelland s new book, Ultralight Backpacking Tips. Instead of a pack cover or individual dry sacks for the sleeping bag/quilt, and
                      Message 10 of 24 , Jan 31, 2012
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                        Just got a good tip from Mike Clelland's new book, Ultralight Backpacking Tips. Instead of a pack cover or individual dry sacks for the sleeping bag/quilt, and clothes, use a trash compactor bag. It weighs in at 2.4 oz. on my Ohaus. They are 2'1" X 2' 11" so you could trim it a bit or twist it and tie it off. It's pretty strong and will survive being dropped into any stream crossing, keeping your essentials dry.
                        Got my base weight down to 15 lb. Leaving camp shoes behind, Wearing nylon/mesh hiking shoes. I have soaked my Moabs in a bucket of water, put the insoles back in, put on dry socks, and hikes six miles in them here in Hawaii. No problem with the feet. I weighed them when I got home. Only 1-oz. of water still in them so they dry rather quickly.
                        SNAKES! Just a groundcloth and fly this trip. Wondering if the snakes are friendly and like to cuddle at night? Have not seen a snake on the JMT these past two years. Any tales?
                      • charliepolecat
                        No problem with the feet. I weighed them when I got home. Only 1-oz. of water still in them so they dry rather quickly. Was that with or without the rest of
                        Message 11 of 24 , Jan 31, 2012
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                          "No problem with the feet. I weighed them when I got home. Only 1-oz. of water still in them so they dry rather quickly."

                          Was that with or without the rest of the body?
                        • Bronco
                          Good one! I m usually more precise in my wording. Now is not the time to plug my new book, I assume.
                          Message 12 of 24 , Jan 31, 2012
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                            Good one! I'm usually more precise in my wording. Now is not the time to plug my new book, I assume.


                            --- In johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com, "charliepolecat" <kennethjessett@...> wrote:
                            >
                            > "No problem with the feet. I weighed them when I got home. Only 1-oz. of water still in them so they dry rather quickly."
                            >
                            > Was that with or without the rest of the body?
                            >
                          • Jeremy foltz
                            I just finished the book as well and have experienced a hard rainstorm while hiking with compactor bag. Everything was dry. I used a smaller garbage bag
                            Message 13 of 24 , Jan 31, 2012
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                              I just finished the book as well and have experienced a hard rainstorm while hiking with compactor bag.    Everything was dry.     I used a smaller garbage bag for my sleeping bag.  

                              The other tip I am using is getting rid of the knife and replacing it with a razor blade.    

                            • Peter Burke
                              ... two of these right on the trail in 2010, one between Half Dome and Sunrise Creek, the other one near Reds Meadow:
                              Message 14 of 24 , Jan 31, 2012
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                                On 1/31/2012 11:40 AM, Bronco wrote:
                                >
                                > SNAKES! Just a groundcloth and fly this trip. Wondering if the snakes are friendly and like to cuddle at night? Have not seen a snake on the JMT these past two years. Any tales?
                                >

                                two of these right on the trail in 2010, one between Half Dome and
                                Sunrise Creek, the other one near Reds Meadow:

                                http://didnt.doit.wisc.edu/outdoor/gallery/JMT2010/20100715/slides/DSC_1293_crop.jpg


                                according to rangers, rattle snakes are moving higher and higher. They
                                have been spotted up to 9500 feet in Kings Canyon.
                              • Bronco
                                (I didn t write that book)I have a Gerber Curve Blue multi-tool that weighs .8 oz. The flat head screwdriver opens my Bearikade Weekender. Ya cain t go wrong
                                Message 15 of 24 , Jan 31, 2012
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                                  (I didn't write that book)I have a Gerber Curve Blue multi-tool that weighs .8 oz. The flat head screwdriver opens my Bearikade Weekender. Ya cain't go wrong with this little beauty. Gerber steel holds an edge for a long time. Plus it's a bottle opener!

                                  http://www.gerbergear.com/Essentials/Tools/Curve-Tool_31-000116

                                  --- In johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com, Jeremy foltz <jdarwinfoltz@...> wrote:
                                  >
                                  > I just finished the book as well and have experienced a hard rainstorm
                                  > while hiking with compactor bag. Everything was dry. I used a
                                  > smaller garbage bag for my sleeping bag.
                                  >
                                  > The other tip I am using is getting rid of the knife and replacing it with
                                  > a razor blade.
                                  >
                                • Bronco
                                  What are the chances? Each year, approximately 8,000 venomous snakebites occur in the United States. Between 1960 and 1990, no more than 12 fatalities from
                                  Message 16 of 24 , Jan 31, 2012
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                                    What are the chances? Each year, approximately 8,000 venomous snakebites occur in the United States. Between 1960 and 1990, no more than 12 fatalities from snake venom poisoning were reported annually.

                                    --- In johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com, Peter Burke <pburke@...> wrote:
                                    >
                                    > On 1/31/2012 11:40 AM, Bronco wrote:
                                    > >
                                    > > SNAKES! Just a groundcloth and fly this trip. Wondering if the snakes are friendly and like to cuddle at night? Have not seen a snake on the JMT these past two years. Any tales?
                                    > >
                                    >
                                    > two of these right on the trail in 2010, one between Half Dome and
                                    > Sunrise Creek, the other one near Reds Meadow:
                                    >
                                    > http://didnt.doit.wisc.edu/outdoor/gallery/JMT2010/20100715/slides/DSC_1293_crop.jpg
                                    >
                                    >
                                    > according to rangers, rattle snakes are moving higher and higher. They
                                    > have been spotted up to 9500 feet in Kings Canyon.
                                    >
                                  • Peter Burke
                                    ... you asked about snakes. Chances? Talk to my daughter, who almost stepped on both of them over the time frame of about 3 days.
                                    Message 17 of 24 , Jan 31, 2012
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                                      On 1/31/2012 1:32 PM, Bronco wrote:
                                      > What are the chances? Each year, approximately 8,000 venomous snakebites occur in the United States. Between 1960 and 1990, no more than 12 fatalities from snake venom poisoning were reported annually.
                                      you asked about snakes. Chances? Talk to my daughter, who almost stepped
                                      on both of them over the time frame of about 3 days.
                                    • Kim Fishburn
                                      I m sure there are snakes higher up, but the only ones I ve seen in the Sierras were at about 6000 ft and below. The biggest I ve ever seen was in the Little
                                      Message 18 of 24 , Jan 31, 2012
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                                        I'm sure there are snakes higher up, but the only ones I've seen in the Sierras were at about 6000 ft and below. The biggest I've ever seen was in the Little Yosemite Valley campground. It was about 5 to 6 ft long. It was crawling through the campground with a ground squirrel following right on its tail chattering away like crazy to warn everyone. I saw a couple in the Grand Canyon of the Tuolumne and the rest were along the Middle Fork of the Kings closer to Simpson Meadow.


                                        From: Peter Burke <pburke@...>
                                        To: johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com
                                        Sent: Tuesday, January 31, 2012 2:41 PM
                                        Subject: Re: [John Muir Trail] Interior pack cover? Snakes?

                                         
                                        On 1/31/2012 1:32 PM, Bronco wrote:
                                        > What are the chances? Each year, approximately 8,000 venomous snakebites occur in the United States. Between 1960 and 1990, no more than 12 fatalities from snake venom poisoning were reported annually.
                                        you asked about snakes. Chances? Talk to my daughter, who almost stepped
                                        on both of them over the time frame of about 3 days.



                                      • Don Amundson
                                        So Bronco--does the weight savings on the Gerber mean you can pack a bottle of Bud Light to use that bottle opener on?:-)
                                        Message 19 of 24 , Jan 31, 2012
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                                          So Bronco--does the weight savings on the Gerber mean you can pack a bottle of Bud Light to use that bottle opener on?:-)


                                          On Jan 31, 2012, at 11:14 AM, "Bronco" <dawgbronco@...> wrote:

                                           

                                          (I didn't write that book)I have a Gerber Curve Blue multi-tool that weighs .8 oz. The flat head screwdriver opens my Bearikade Weekender. Ya cain't go wrong with this little beauty. Gerber steel holds an edge for a long time. Plus it's a bottle opener!


                                        • Bill Hegardt
                                          ... Good question! I also wonder if light beer weighs less than regular? But seriously, I recommend that if you have any free space in your resupply bucket,
                                          Message 20 of 24 , Jan 31, 2012
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                                            On Tue, Jan 31, 2012 at 2:46 PM, Don Amundson <amrowinc@...> wrote:
                                             

                                            So Bronco--does the weight savings on the Gerber mean you can pack a bottle of Bud Light to use that bottle opener on?:-)

                                             Good question! I also wonder if "light" beer weighs less than regular?  But seriously, I recommend that if you have any free space in your resupply bucket, put some beer in there (or your beverage of choice).  Last summer, between the 3 of us, we had 12 bottles of Newcastle waiting for us at MTR where no beer is available for sale. We had no shortage of friends that day...

                                            - Bill

                                          • Bronco
                                            It means I can enjoy some microbrews I ll ship to MTR!
                                            Message 21 of 24 , Jan 31, 2012
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                                              It means I can enjoy some microbrews I'll ship to MTR!

                                              --- In johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com, Don Amundson <amrowinc@...> wrote:
                                              >
                                              >
                                              > So Bronco--does the weight savings on the Gerber mean you can pack a bottle of Bud Light to use that bottle opener on?:-)
                                              >
                                              >
                                              > On Jan 31, 2012, at 11:14 AM, "Bronco" <dawgbronco@...> wrote:
                                              >
                                              > > (I didn't write that book)I have a Gerber Curve Blue multi-tool that weighs .8 oz. The flat head screwdriver opens my Bearikade Weekender. Ya cain't go wrong with this little beauty. Gerber steel holds an edge for a long time. Plus it's a bottle opener!
                                              > >
                                              > >
                                              > >
                                              >
                                            • Bronco
                                              Sent two bottles of old vine zin one year. Lovely dinner after the hot springs with the neighbors who also had a red! Together we cooked up a five course meal.
                                              Message 22 of 24 , Jan 31, 2012
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                                                Sent two bottles of old vine zin one year. Lovely dinner after the hot springs with the neighbors who also had a red! Together we cooked up a five course meal. We did 13-miles next day, over Seldon Pass all the way to Bear Creek Trail.

                                                --- In johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com, Bill Hegardt <bill@...> wrote:
                                                >
                                                > On Tue, Jan 31, 2012 at 2:46 PM, Don Amundson <amrowinc@...> wrote:
                                                >
                                                > > **
                                                > >
                                                > >
                                                > > So Bronco--does the weight savings on the Gerber mean you can pack a
                                                > > bottle of Bud Light to use that bottle opener on?:-)
                                                > >
                                                > Good question! I also wonder if "light" beer weighs less than regular?
                                                > But seriously, I recommend that if you have any free space in your resupply
                                                > bucket, put some beer in there (or your beverage of choice). Last summer,
                                                > between the 3 of us, we had 12 bottles of Newcastle waiting for us at MTR
                                                > where no beer is available for sale. We had no shortage of friends that
                                                > day...
                                                >
                                                > - Bill
                                                >
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