Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: How do you typically plan your itinerary from MTR to Whitney?

Expand Messages
  • hmdsierra
    I liked it too. I could almost feel the breeze/ When my 10 year old son and I did it, gosh almost 20 years ago, we averaged a bit over 9 miles a day. When
    Message 1 of 5 , Jan 21, 2012
    • 0 Attachment
      I liked it too. I could almost feel the breeze/ When my 10 year old son and I did it, gosh almost 20 years ago, we averaged a bit over 9 miles a day. When jy friend and I went again we followed the same schedule or a bit slower. When I'm in the woods I'm in no hurry.

      I know what you mean about a night on Mt. Whitney, Two years before out JMY trip we spent a night there. My 8 year old and my friend had no trouble but I woke up 3 or 4 times to purge my lungs. .

      --- In johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com, "Robert" <rnperky@...> wrote:
      >
      > Robert, Your description was awesome! I was cracking up on some of your comments. I am with you on the camping at Wallace, way too crowded, usually buggy, and usually too many people. I also had to laugh about the talking and headlamps at 2:00 AM as that has happened to me as well at the tarns above Guitar Lake. I also agree on the section between Bighorn Plateau and Crabtree as a 'get r done' section. It doesn't matter which direction I am going I feel the same way about that spot. That camping spot between Center Basin Jct. and Forester Pass is a 'sweet' spot though. The views are awesome looking down canyon towards Vidette Mdws and the headwaters of Vidette Creek cascading down into the valley...makes me want to be there now.
      >
      > --- In johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com, robert shattuck <bobolonius@> wrote:
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > > Just some thoughts . . . (I'm 54, as a physical ref. but been doing the JMT pretty much every summer since '96 . . . keeping pretty much the same 10-12 mile a day pace) . . . and as I have nothin' much to do these days of near unemployment . . .
      > > Day 1––there's nothing like spending an hour or two, soaking in the Blaney Hot Springs and taking in the stars. Just remember that if you are camping on that side of the river and you casually walk out, maybe at sunset, headed for the tub, don't forget to take your headlamp––made that mistake once––both me and a friend, just shorts, sandals and T's . . . and it was pitch black.
      > > If you decide to soak and then head out just a ways, getting to the bridge/Piute Junction is a casual walk, but again, should you get there at night, scope out the camp spots there( past the bridge off the right) as this area is often used by packers and you can end up pitching your tent in the wrong place.
      > > I often leave Blaney/MTR around four p.m. and again––an easy walk all the way to the junction there at Franklin (packers again!) Meadows. Camp here and . . .
      > > Day 2––hit the switch-backs bright an early and if you're feeling casual, spend the day strolling up past McClure Ranger station and again, stop at the SB's, or bang 'em out and spend the night at Evolution Lakes.
      > > Day 3––short and very sweet . . . I'd just go to Wanda Lake. It's best to camp right there where you hit it, as there are several spots right there, on both sides of thte trail . . . but if you keep going, there really are (no obvious) none until you pass Wanda and get up near the next lake. I've never actually seen anyone camped in this region.
      > > Day 4––if you stay at Wanda and have the fire in you, then Deer Meadow is doable––but depending on the snow conditions, going down the south side of Muir can be taxing . . . lots and lots of places to camp between Muir Hut . . . down into Big and little Pete and . . . all the way to the junction for Deer Meadow/Mather Pass.
      > > I usually stop at the junction, have dinner or a snack and then give it that last bit of energy to get up into Deer Meadow or past it, before dark sets in. There aren't a lot of spots to camp. Sure you hit a few in Deer Meadow, but then, it's shall we say, meadow--forest--meadow--meadow and if you walk through one patch of trees and see nothing, then you move on to the next and . . . so if darkness is upon you, make a choice.
      > > Day 5––Lots of times I've made it up the Golden Staircase and just called it quits. Not a bad place to sit and feel the peaks and the clouds rolling through, or just fish.
      > > But again, if you get out of Deer Meadow early and power up through the Staircase, take a break for an hour or so, you can get over Mather and all the way down towards the the South Fork of the Kings River.
      > > If you spent the day going up and over Mather and it's getting to be about 4 or 5 p.m., I'd camp high with the Vistas rather than going down into SFKR . . . but again, if you've got it in you, cross the River, do the switchbacks and stay up just past Bench Lake Junction . . . again, not a bad place to look out and end the day.
      > > Day 6––Over Pinchot and all the way to Woods Creek Junction ( . . . but I've always wanted to stay just below the south side switch-backs) where you can and usually find a few people that are doing the Rae Lakes Loop, north . . . so they have trail info for you, and often times, too much food that they are happy to throw at you.
      > > Again, if it's in you, keep going . . . if you can get past Dollar Lake, then you can camp between there and Arrowhead, but you might as well just go to Arrowhead, as there aren't really any designated, or obvious spots to camp in between––you have to wander off the trail a few yards and dream of a flat spot.
      > > Day 7––Past Rae Lakes (which you could have also made last night . . .) and up over lovely Glen Pass. This is always a good long day for me, as I don't like Vidette Meadow. It's pretty, but it's usually got bears, so I always stop there, eyes open in the back of my head, eat something, and then power on . . .
      > > Once you get up about an hour out of Vidette, slightly above tree-line, there's a very spacious camp spot/ground. Lots of hikers like to call it quits here, but if you go another 30-45 minutes of very gradual climbing, you get up to the plateau, below Forester. Several places to camp up here.
      > > From a previous post:
      > > Descend into and climb out of Vidette Meadow and head up towards Forester. It's only about 8.5 miles and the trail is very gradual uphill and basically straight, but eventually you find a plot of camp sites off to your right and with a sharp left turn and a burst of energy, you find yourself on a wonderful plateau. Drop your pack. This is, to me, a lovely place to spend the night. I usually stop right there. You can cowboy camp under the little spot in the trees (you'll know it when you see it) or pitch a tent in two or three spots . . . but last year I realized, yes last year, some lovely gals pulled up behind me and I stupidly said, "why don't you head on up there a ways and camp in those rocks."(remember the scene in Dumb and Dumber, at the end when the bus load of tanned bikini models ask the two idiots if they know of two guys who might want to help them lotion up. Yeah that was me) http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UfSOumv-QQ4So the gang of lovely girls marched on about four minutes up the trail and perched themselves in the sunny rocks and I sat there, in the shade, thinking, why did I not go up there.
      > > Day 8––Crank out Forester and make it all the way to Bighorn Plateau. Pitch camp at the little pond––and don't camp on the grass. This is one of my favorite places, with a 360 degree view of heaven. You can see the backside of Whitney.
      > > But you could also just stay at Tyndall (bear box) or hike up to South American Lake for, I would imagine, some real solitude.
      > > "Lots" of people seem to camp at Wallace, and it's down in the trees, no views, so if your goal is solitude, I'd stay elsewhere.
      > > Day 9––while it's pretty and relatively easy, I consider the section between Big Horn and Crabtree to be a sort of, 'Get 'er done' section . . . not a lot to blow your mind and usually, your mind, is is occupied with thoughts of Guitar Lake and beyond, so shuffle on, grab a wag bag at, Ye Olde Wag Bag Stop, and keep going.
      > > Most people, when they get to Guitar, they huddle in there, not really knowing what might be beyond it in terms of camping for the night, but if you just keep shuffling up the trail another 10-15 minutes you'll find several more spots and adequate water for spending the night. The last spots to camp though are a cluster of rock-walled spots––any further past them and you are without water, or spots to camp.
      > > Day 10––Up before the sun and need a headlamp? No doubt you spent the night with several hikers jabbering and hitting your tent with their headlamp beams, while they either passed your camp spot or they were right next to you and took a good hour or more to break camp at 2 a.m.
      > > If you are thinking at all about spending the night on Whitney, then I'd stay snuggled in your bag until well after the sun has come up. I'd move about slowly and reflect on the last several days . . . if you're fit and in a hurry the west side can be done probably in about three hours or much less to the junction and then another hour or less to the summit––so I'd leave around 2 or 3 p.m. and be there in time to greet the last fleeing summiteers as you figure you out where to camp for the night.
      > > if you're older, a slug-bug plodder, then . . . I'd leave around noon and maybe not think of staying on top, if only because it can be a long night of gulping air. I'd summit and then head carefully, should it be dark, down to Trail Camp.
      > > Not once, but twice, have I dumped it nicely on the east side switch-backs. Go slow and they are tame. Go fast and they might eat you. be careful, ESPECIALLY if it is dark.
      > > Day 11 . . . So you spent the night on whitney. Did you get much sleep. It's cold up there and aside from waking up all the time, gasping for air, there are always a good number of hikers who arrive at all hours of the early morning, all intent on being there for the sunrise, but while it's still dark up there and cold, they have to run around and make lots of noise and phone calls, the ubiquitous, "can you hear me now . . .no? . . . guess where I am . . . no, guess"
      > > Some nights I have been up there and it is dead silent until the sun rises, with considerate folk tip-toeing around the rocks, but usually it's a lot of happy chatter, that if anything, encourages you to get up and get the hell out of there.
      > > Again, wether you are on the summit or camped down at Trail Camp, take your time . . . it's all downhill.
      > >
      > > BOB
      > > http://www.summitpost.org/plans/view_activity.php?post_id=6480
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > > Switch to: Text-Only, Daily Digest • Unsubscribe • Terms of Use
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > > .
      > >
      >
    Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.