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Trip Planning

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  • dmarleuk
    Hello there, If my permit application works out then I m planning a SOBO walk this summer. I m hoping to fly into SF, spend a couple of nights there and then
    Message 1 of 26 , Jan 17, 2012
      Hello there,
      If my permit application works out then I'm planning a SOBO walk this summer. I'm hoping to fly into SF, spend a couple of nights there and then take the bus train combination out to Yosemite. I have a couple of questions:

      - To get the earlier transport I will need to be in Emeryville at 07.40. It looks like I will need to take a bus at 06.00 from Fisherman's Wharf as the later bus leaves at 06.50 and arrives at 07.30 and might be a bit tight. Thought I would try to stay around the Fisherman's Wharf area. Any ideas or other options please?

      - If I manage to leave Emeryville at 07.40, I will arrive at 13.10. Is it possible to pick my permit up and leave the same day or will the this take a long time time to sort out?

      Thanks
      David
    • robert shattuck
      If I manage to leave Emeryville at 07.40, I will arrive at 13.10. Is it possible to pick my permit up and leave the same day or will the this take a long time
      Message 2 of 26 , Jan 18, 2012
        "If I manage to leave Emeryville at 07.40, I will arrive at 13.10. Is it possible to pick my permit up and leave the same day or will the this take a long time time to sort out?"

        No, if you have a permit waiting, it won't take long at all. If the bus lands at 1:10 and you know where you're going (the permit office) and you are to hit the trail that day, then you will be on the trail by about 2 p.m., if you like . . . But I would say show up the day before your permit, not the day of, as that might . . . Assuming they know (or assume) you are showing up on a given day, I'm not sure how long they hold them, but it might only be until 11 a.m., when they start issuing to all the "walk-in" folk. 


        David, 

        I can never remember if there's an earlier bus out of SF . . . it might be about 4:30 a.m, but just take the 7 a.m. and you'll be fine, . . . Arrive in SF and spend as many days as you like seeing the sights and so on, as well as securing a one-way AMTRAK ticket to Yosemite. 

        Having done this a few times I can tell you that the cost of a one-way ticket will vary, but should be anywhere from about $38 to $50 dollars. You will have no problems walking into the AMTRAK office, located just next the Ferry Building, on the Embarcadero. I would suggest buying the ticket the day before (or whenever you are nearby) you plan to depart, rather than having to deal with it in the morning. 

        The AMTRAK bus leaves from the curb at about 7:10 a.m., takes you across the bay bridge to the AMTRAK station in Emeryville. Get off the bus, being sure to grab your backpack. Don't check it, just carry it on and stow it in the racks just inside the train doors*

        The train arrives in Emeryville in about 10 minutes then departs and after a few hours will drop you in Merced, where you will wait with a curious group of people, all carrying backpacks, some not, but all wondering where the bus will pull up––it will, and you will all get on for a pleasant ride of about two or so hours. 

        Once the bus enters Yosemite park, the driver will give you a run-down of his stops, the last of which will be the visitors center. get off here, but don't go into the visitor center for your permit––the permit office is to the right ( as you face the VC) . . . past the post office and the Ansel Adams gallery. 

        If you've already got a permit waiting in the office, then you are golden. Walk in and get it; rejoice and either head out on the trail or go shopping, or both.

        But if you do a "walk-in" permit chances are good that if you are solo, you'll walk in and get exactly or nearly what you want, right then and there. Ideally, if you just got in on the bus and you've say, also come in from Europe or elsewhere, you might be tired. You probably would like to spend the rest of the day in the valley, buying things like fuel and so on . . . 

        There's a very good chance you'll get a permit to leave from Happy Isles in the morning and they'll either say you must stay in Little Yosemite Valley, or you must pass through. I'd take either option just to get on the trail. 

        If you  get a permit to leave the next morning and go only to LYV, take it. You will also be given a ticket to go to Half Dome (unless they've changed that now) which you can get for that day, or the next. I don't think they're too fussy as long as you have a ticket in hand, you can summit.

        If you are only supposed to go to LYV I'd take it easy in the morning, as it will only take you about four hours to get up there. Maybe less or more, depending on how fit you are. If you get there early, set up camp and then, you can run up to Half Dome and be back by dinner. 

        If they give you a "pass through" meaning you are not to stay at LYV, then you really only need to get past the Half Dome junction and camp somewhere between the junction and Sunrise. I would advise, of course, either stopping near water, or be prepared to dry camp for the night. 

        You might also find yourself standing there in the permit office and the little ranger kid says your only option . . . it's always a combo . . . if you want to leave from HI, you have to do it today, NOW, otherwise you will have to leave from Glacier Point in the morning, or some such option. Take whatever you can deal with, time-wise. 

        Also, owing to the fact that this year seems to be shaping up as a late winter, there might be a lot of snow in the Sierra, late into the season. All the people who wanted to do it in july have now decided, like last year, to show up in August. This sucks, but again, if you're solo, you stand a much better chance of getting out of that office, permit in hand. 

        This last August 15th I showed up, as usual, but with a partner, and we ended up having to come back in the early morning (5 a.m., but 2 a.m. and a sleeping bag would have been better) stand in line until 11 a.m. and then . . . we couldn't leave until the following morning. You should build in buffer days in case you get stuck like this. 

        It sucks to be on a tight schedule and then have to make up for two lost days of hiking. 

        Once you get the permit, or the news, like, "come back tomorrow" walk back to the bus stop and cross the street to catch a free shuttle bus to the backpackers camp. It's stop #18 (?) the stables, walk past the stables and follow the road into the camp ground. 

        You'll pass the bathrooms on the right, then the camp stewards motor home and then another bathroom on the left and . . . you follow that road down another fifty yards or so and you'll see a sign for the backpackers camp, walk off the road to the right and follow the path, cross the bridge and there you are––the backpackers camp ground.It costs $5 a night. 

        How much do you want to spend for a hotel room in San Francisco? There are plenty of places ($$) very close to the Ferry Building, but whether you stay somewhere on Market Street (as far down as 9th Street) or Fisherman's wharf, a taxi commute will be about ten minutes. I always get to the bus stop at 6:30 a.m.



        *I've never had a problem storing my backpack downstairs on the train, but apparently some unlucky couple at some point, after finishing their JMT, had their packs taken or at least something taken from them. I make it a practice when stopping for any length of time, longer than a minute or so, to just hang out downstairs––and it's easy enough, once you meet other backpackers to get everyone involved in taking turns standing guard, but in general, there's not much to worry about. 





        BOB
        http://www.summitpost.org/plans/view_activity.php?post_id=6480




        .

      • Michael
        David, There are a lot of hotels within walking distance of Fisherman s wharf. The only issue is if they are booked up or not. There are a lot of tourists
        Message 3 of 26 , Jan 18, 2012
          David,
          There are a lot of hotels within walking distance of Fisherman's wharf. The only issue is if they are booked up or not. There are a lot of tourists there throughout the year and Alcatraz trips are booked 6-8 months in advance. Start doing your online searches for your hotel stay earlier rather than later or you'll be looking to stay upwards of Sonoma or Napa Valley possibly. That is what happened to us last year. You can start with Holiday Inn which is about a block from Fisherman's Wharf and take it from there. If they can't book you for your planned night/s then ask their reservations person for other hotels nearby. I am sure they can assist.
          Good luck
          Mike Mosack

          --- In johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com, "dmarleuk" <dmarleuk@...> wrote:
          >
          > Hello there,
          > If my permit application works out then I'm planning a SOBO walk this summer. I'm hoping to fly into SF, spend a couple of nights there and then take the bus train combination out to Yosemite. I have a couple of questions:
          >
          > - To get the earlier transport I will need to be in Emeryville at 07.40. It looks like I will need to take a bus at 06.00 from Fisherman's Wharf as the later bus leaves at 06.50 and arrives at 07.30 and might be a bit tight. Thought I would try to stay around the Fisherman's Wharf area. Any ideas or other options please?
          >
          > - If I manage to leave Emeryville at 07.40, I will arrive at 13.10. Is it possible to pick my permit up and leave the same day or will the this take a long time time to sort out?
          >
          > Thanks
          > David
          >
        • dmarleuk
          Hi Mike, Thanks for that and point noted about booking hotels! I thought I would book a hostel now and if I can t get a permit or something changes I ll only
          Message 4 of 26 , Jan 18, 2012
            Hi Mike,
            Thanks for that and point noted about booking hotels! I thought I would book a hostel now and if I can't get a permit or something changes I'll only be out the 5% deposit.

            I see there is a Youth Hostel near Fisherman's Wharf in Mason Park. It looks fairly easy to get over to the Embarcadero for the Train/Bus.
            What do you think?
            David

            --- In johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com, "Michael" <mosack@...> wrote:
            >
            > David,
            > There are a lot of hotels within walking distance of Fisherman's wharf. The only issue is if they are booked up or not. There are a lot of tourists there throughout the year and Alcatraz trips are booked 6-8 months in advance. Start doing your online searches for your hotel stay earlier rather than later or you'll be looking to stay upwards of Sonoma or Napa Valley possibly. That is what happened to us last year. You can start with Holiday Inn which is about a block from Fisherman's Wharf and take it from there. If they can't book you for your planned night/s then ask their reservations person for other hotels nearby. I am sure they can assist.
            > Good luck
            > Mike Mosack
            >
            > --- In johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com, "dmarleuk" <dmarleuk@> wrote:
            > >
            > > Hello there,
            > > If my permit application works out then I'm planning a SOBO walk this summer. I'm hoping to fly into SF, spend a couple of nights there and then take the bus train combination out to Yosemite. I have a couple of questions:
            > >
            > > - To get the earlier transport I will need to be in Emeryville at 07.40. It looks like I will need to take a bus at 06.00 from Fisherman's Wharf as the later bus leaves at 06.50 and arrives at 07.30 and might be a bit tight. Thought I would try to stay around the Fisherman's Wharf area. Any ideas or other options please?
            > >
            > > - If I manage to leave Emeryville at 07.40, I will arrive at 13.10. Is it possible to pick my permit up and leave the same day or will the this take a long time time to sort out?
            > >
            > > Thanks
            > > David
            > >
            >
          • dmarleuk
            Hi Bob, Thanks for the extremely comprehensive reply. I guess if I manage to secure a permit then I ll need to inform them I will be arriving on the day. The
            Message 5 of 26 , Jan 18, 2012
              Hi Bob,
              Thanks for the extremely comprehensive reply. I guess if I manage to secure a permit then I'll need to inform them I will be arriving on the day. The transport info was really helpful.

              Getting back from Whitney Portal seems like a bit of a pain. I was thinking of taking the bus (providing I'm there on the right day) to Reno airport and then a flight to LAX. Watching permit information closely...
              David

              --- In johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com, robert shattuck <bobolonius@...> wrote:
              >
              >
              > "If I manage to leave Emeryville at 07.40, I will arrive at 13.10. Is it possible to pick my permit up and leave the same day or will the this take a long time time to sort out?"
              > No, if you have a permit waiting, it won't take long at all. If the bus lands at 1:10 and you know where you're going (the permit office) and you are to hit the trail that day, then you will be on the trail by about 2 p.m., if you like . . . But I would say show up the day before your permit, not the day of, as that might . . . Assuming they know (or assume) you are showing up on a given day, I'm not sure how long they hold them, but it might only be until 11 a.m., when they start issuing to all the "walk-in" folk.
              >
              > David,
              > I can never remember if there's an earlier bus out of SF . . . it might be about 4:30 a.m, but just take the 7 a.m. and you'll be fine, . . . Arrive in SF and spend as many days as you like seeing the sights and so on, as well as securing a one-way AMTRAK ticket to Yosemite.
              > Having done this a few times I can tell you that the cost of a one-way ticket will vary, but should be anywhere from about $38 to $50 dollars. You will have no problems walking into the AMTRAK office, located just next the Ferry Building, on the Embarcadero. I would suggest buying the ticket the day before (or whenever you are nearby) you plan to depart, rather than having to deal with it in the morning.
              > The AMTRAK bus leaves from the curb at about 7:10 a.m., takes you across the bay bridge to the AMTRAK station in Emeryville. Get off the bus, being sure to grab your backpack. Don't check it, just carry it on and stow it in the racks just inside the train doors*
              > The train arrives in Emeryville in about 10 minutes then departs and after a few hours will drop you in Merced, where you will wait with a curious group of people, all carrying backpacks, some not, but all wondering where the bus will pull up––it will, and you will all get on for a pleasant ride of about two or so hours.
              > Once the bus enters Yosemite park, the driver will give you a run-down of his stops, the last of which will be the visitors center. get off here, but don't go into the visitor center for your permit––the permit office is to the right ( as you face the VC) . . . past the post office and the Ansel Adams gallery.
              > If you've already got a permit waiting in the office, then you are golden. Walk in and get it; rejoice and either head out on the trail or go shopping, or both.
              > But if you do a "walk-in" permit chances are good that if you are solo, you'll walk in and get exactly or nearly what you want, right then and there. Ideally, if you just got in on the bus and you've say, also come in from Europe or elsewhere, you might be tired. You probably would like to spend the rest of the day in the valley, buying things like fuel and so on . . .
              > There's a very good chance you'll get a permit to leave from Happy Isles in the morning and they'll either say you must stay in Little Yosemite Valley, or you must pass through. I'd take either option just to get on the trail.
              > If you get a permit to leave the next morning and go only to LYV, take it. You will also be given a ticket to go to Half Dome (unless they've changed that now) which you can get for that day, or the next. I don't think they're too fussy as long as you have a ticket in hand, you can summit.
              > If you are only supposed to go to LYV I'd take it easy in the morning, as it will only take you about four hours to get up there. Maybe less or more, depending on how fit you are. If you get there early, set up camp and then, you can run up to Half Dome and be back by dinner.
              > If they give you a "pass through" meaning you are not to stay at LYV, then you really only need to get past the Half Dome junction and camp somewhere between the junction and Sunrise. I would advise, of course, either stopping near water, or be prepared to dry camp for the night.
              > You might also find yourself standing there in the permit office and the little ranger kid says your only option . . . it's always a combo . . . if you want to leave from HI, you have to do it today, NOW, otherwise you will have to leave from Glacier Point in the morning, or some such option. Take whatever you can deal with, time-wise.
              > Also, owing to the fact that this year seems to be shaping up as a late winter, there might be a lot of snow in the Sierra, late into the season. All the people who wanted to do it in july have now decided, like last year, to show up in August. This sucks, but again, if you're solo, you stand a much better chance of getting out of that office, permit in hand.
              > This last August 15th I showed up, as usual, but with a partner, and we ended up having to come back in the early morning (5 a.m., but 2 a.m. and a sleeping bag would have been better) stand in line until 11 a.m. and then . . . we couldn't leave until the following morning. You should build in buffer days in case you get stuck like this.
              > It sucks to be on a tight schedule and then have to make up for two lost days of hiking.
              > Once you get the permit, or the news, like, "come back tomorrow" walk back to the bus stop and cross the street to catch a free shuttle bus to the backpackers camp. It's stop #18 (?) the stables, walk past the stables and follow the road into the camp ground.
              > You'll pass the bathrooms on the right, then the camp stewards motor home and then another bathroom on the left and . . . you follow that road down another fifty yards or so and you'll see a sign for the backpackers camp, walk off the road to the right and follow the path, cross the bridge and there you are––the backpackers camp ground.It costs $5 a night.
              > How much do you want to spend for a hotel room in San Francisco? There are plenty of places ($$) very close to the Ferry Building, but whether you stay somewhere on Market Street (as far down as 9th Street) or Fisherman's wharf, a taxi commute will be about ten minutes. I always get to the bus stop at 6:30 a.m.
              >
              >
              > *I've never had a problem storing my backpack downstairs on the train, but apparently some unlucky couple at some point, after finishing their JMT, had their packs taken or at least something taken from them. I make it a practice when stopping for any length of time, longer than a minute or so, to just hang out downstairs––and it's easy enough, once you meet other backpackers to get everyone involved in taking turns standing guard, but in general, there's not much to worry about.
              >
              >
              >
              >
              > BOBhttp://www.summitpost.org/plans/view_activity.php?post_id=6480
              >
              >
              >
              > .
              >
            • Michael
              dmarleuk wrote: I thought I would book a hostel now and if I can t get a permit or something changes I ll only be out the 5% deposit. ...
              Message 6 of 26 , Jan 18, 2012
                "dmarleuk" <dmarleuk@...> wrote:

                "I thought I would book a hostel now and if I can't get a permit or something changes I'll only be out the 5% deposit.
                >
                > I see there is a Youth Hostel near Fisherman's Wharf in Mason Park. It looks fairly easy to get over to the Embarcadero for the Train/Bus.
                > What do you think?
                > David"

                David, I think your only hurdle would being able to book a room due to the tourists. Availability will be your main problem. You have really got a lot of options for places within just a couple of blocks from the wharf, but availability is what caused us to have to go 20+ miles away before we found an available room. There happened to be multiple events all scheduled in the SF area that weekend, but that area is a huge draw for tourism throughout the year, so book early and you should be fine. Traveling around SF and especially down around the water (Fisherman's Wharf, Embarcadero, etc) is easy as there are trollies, buses, taxis, horse-drawn carriages, and more to pick from. You might even decide to stay an extra day or two just to enjoy the area and sample all the foods and the sights...
                Mike
              • Jeremy foltz
                David, I would skip Fisherman s Wharf altogether and stay in Jack London Square in Oakland. You can get there via the Civic Center Bart Stop (Bay Area
                Message 7 of 26 , Jan 18, 2012
                  David,

                  I would skip Fisherman's Wharf altogether and stay in Jack London Square in Oakland.   You can get there via the Civic Center Bart Stop (Bay Area Subway) if you are flying in to Oakland or San Francisco.   Way less tourists and you would not have to take public transit in the morning to get to the train.   You would simply walk 5 minutes to the train stop and begin your trip.    

                  There are a couple of hotel options.   The Jack London Inn is right there.   It is cheap and  no frills but you are close to some great restaurants and out of tourist hell.   It is worse than Happy Isles :) 

                  Best,

                  Jeremy


                  On Wed, Jan 18, 2012 at 6:38 AM, Michael <mosack@...> wrote:
                   

                  "dmarleuk" <dmarleuk@...> wrote:

                  "I thought I would book a hostel now and if I can't get a permit or something changes I'll only be out the 5% deposit.
                  >
                  > I see there is a Youth Hostel near Fisherman's Wharf in Mason Park. It looks fairly easy to get over to the Embarcadero for the Train/Bus.
                  > What do you think?
                  > David"

                  David, I think your only hurdle would being able to book a room due to the tourists. Availability will be your main problem. You have really got a lot of options for places within just a couple of blocks from the wharf, but availability is what caused us to have to go 20+ miles away before we found an available room. There happened to be multiple events all scheduled in the SF area that weekend, but that area is a huge draw for tourism throughout the year, so book early and you should be fine. Traveling around SF and especially down around the water (Fisherman's Wharf, Embarcadero, etc) is easy as there are trollies, buses, taxis, horse-drawn carriages, and more to pick from. You might even decide to stay an extra day or two just to enjoy the area and sample all the foods and the sights...
                  Mike


                • Ron Cordell
                  There s a tram/trolley that runs up and down the Embarcadero so you should be able to hop on it easily to get from Fisherman s Wharf to the Ferry Building or
                  Message 8 of 26 , Jan 18, 2012
                    There's a tram/trolley that runs up and down the Embarcadero so you should be able to hop on it easily to get from Fisherman's Wharf to the Ferry Building or wherever. It's also not that long a walk along the Embarcadero. I'm assuming that Mason Park is part of Fort Mason...

                    -ronc

                    On Wed, Jan 18, 2012 at 6:23 AM, dmarleuk <dmarleuk@...> wrote:
                     

                    Hi Mike,
                    Thanks for that and point noted about booking hotels! I thought I would book a hostel now and if I can't get a permit or something changes I'll only be out the 5% deposit.

                    I see there is a Youth Hostel near Fisherman's Wharf in Mason Park. It looks fairly easy to get over to the Embarcadero for the Train/Bus.
                    What do you think?
                    David



                    --- In johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com, "Michael" <mosack@...> wrote:
                    >
                    > David,
                    > There are a lot of hotels within walking distance of Fisherman's wharf. The only issue is if they are booked up or not. There are a lot of tourists there throughout the year and Alcatraz trips are booked 6-8 months in advance. Start doing your online searches for your hotel stay earlier rather than later or you'll be looking to stay upwards of Sonoma or Napa Valley possibly. That is what happened to us last year. You can start with Holiday Inn which is about a block from Fisherman's Wharf and take it from there. If they can't book you for your planned night/s then ask their reservations person for other hotels nearby. I am sure they can assist.
                    > Good luck
                    > Mike Mosack
                    >
                    > --- In johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com, "dmarleuk" <dmarleuk@> wrote:
                    > >
                    > > Hello there,
                    > > If my permit application works out then I'm planning a SOBO walk this summer. I'm hoping to fly into SF, spend a couple of nights there and then take the bus train combination out to Yosemite. I have a couple of questions:
                    > >
                    > > - To get the earlier transport I will need to be in Emeryville at 07.40. It looks like I will need to take a bus at 06.00 from Fisherman's Wharf as the later bus leaves at 06.50 and arrives at 07.30 and might be a bit tight. Thought I would try to stay around the Fisherman's Wharf area. Any ideas or other options please?
                    > >
                    > > - If I manage to leave Emeryville at 07.40, I will arrive at 13.10. Is it possible to pick my permit up and leave the same day or will the this take a long time time to sort out?
                    > >
                    > > Thanks
                    > > David
                    > >
                    >


                  • ahhh_go
                    ... Three of us from east coast are planning to do JMT SOBO in early Sept. This thread has provided lots of great info already - and has convinced me the best
                    Message 9 of 26 , Jan 18, 2012
                      --- In johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com, "dmarleuk" <dmarleuk@...> wrote:
                      >
                      > Hello there,
                      > If my permit application works out then I'm planning a SOBO walk this summer. I'm hoping to fly into SF, spend a couple of nights there and then take the bus train combination out to Yosemite. I have a couple of questions:


                      Three of us from east coast are planning to do JMT SOBO in early Sept. This thread has provided lots of great info already - and has convinced me the best bet on the front end is to fly to SFO or Oak, and take bus/train combo out to Yosemite.

                      Like David, we're thinking about exiting Whitney Portal to Lone Pine, then heading to Reno for flights back home. Does anybody have any tips for the backside of the trip, like:
                      1) Is the CREST bus to Reno a reliable option (assuming we exit on the right days)?
                      2) If so, would you catch it from Lone Pine (via a connector bus), or shuttle up to Bishop or Mammoth from Whitney Portal to catch it there?
                      3) Or is it easier to get back to SFO somehow (all I've found are expensive shuttle/one-way car rental options so far)

                      Thanks for all the informative posts so far.
                    • robert shattuck
                      Flying into SF and out at Reno sounds like a great way to go and you get to see just that more of the east side of things. And rather than spending a lot of
                      Message 10 of 26 , Jan 18, 2012
                        Flying into SF and out at Reno sounds like a great way to go and you get to see just that more of the east side of things. And rather than spending a lot of time getting back to SF, you can jump on the Crest Line and be in Reno in six hours, versus about 15-16 getting back to SF.

                        Finding info on "the crest line" isn't just as easy googling it (or maybe it is) . . . what you are really looking for is the Eastern Sierra Transit Authority:

                        estransit.com


                        You can catch the daily bus out of Lone Pine at 6:15 in the morning and be AT THE AIRPORT by noon. 

                        http://estransit.com/pages/bus-routes/crest--lone-pine-reno.php


                        And as for expensive shuttles . . . don't bother getting one from Whitney Portal to Lone Pine. I'd hate to rob anyone there of an income but I bet they charge way too much for some old guy to come pick you up in his truck and thumbing off the portal is easy. If you're a group of three, trying to get down, then just split up and start walking, thumb out. 

                        Once you get in a car it's only about a 15 minute ride and the road takes you right to Lone Pine and 395 and the Dow Villa Motel is right there, hot tub and all. 

                        http://www.dowvillamotel.com/

                        You can get an economy room (bathroom & shower down the hall) for about $55-60, two beds or one double; or you can go the high route for twice as much and get all the plumbing. 

                        If you need to get back to SF, then you take the same bus, but transfer in Mammoth to a YARTS bus, which then gets you into the Valley at about 1:30 p.m. and you then have to wait until 3 p.m. to catch the bus to Merced and then get on the train and get off in Emeryville, jump on a waiting bus and . . . you're back in SF around 10 p.m. or a little later. 


                        BOB
                        http://www.summitpost.org/plans/view_activity.php?post_id=6480




                        To: johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com
                        From: cryofmercy@...
                        Date: Wed, 18 Jan 2012 17:14:28 +0000
                        Subject: [John Muir Trail] Re: Trip Planning

                         

                        --- In johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com, "dmarleuk" <dmarleuk@...> wrote:
                        >
                        > Hello there,
                        > If my permit application works out then I'm planning a SOBO walk this summer. I'm hoping to fly into SF, spend a couple of nights there and then take the bus train combination out to Yosemite. I have a couple of questions:

                        Three of us from east coast are planning to do JMT SOBO in early Sept. This thread has provided lots of great info already - and has convinced me the best bet on the front end is to fly to SFO or Oak, and take bus/train combo out to Yosemite.

                        Like David, we're thinking about exiting Whitney Portal to Lone Pine, then heading to Reno for flights back home. Does anybody have any tips for the backside of the trip, like:
                        1) Is the CREST bus to Reno a reliable option (assuming we exit on the right days)?
                        2) If so, would you catch it from Lone Pine (via a connector bus), or shuttle up to Bishop or Mammoth from Whitney Portal to catch it there?
                        3) Or is it easier to get back to SFO somehow (all I've found are expensive shuttle/one-way car rental options so far)

                        Thanks for all the informative posts so far.


                      • ahhh_go
                        Good beta. Much appreciated.
                        Message 11 of 26 , Jan 18, 2012
                          Good beta. Much appreciated.

                          --- In johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com, robert shattuck <bobolonius@...> wrote:
                          >
                          >
                          > Flying into SF and out at Reno sounds like a great way to go and you get to see just that more of the east side of things. And rather than spending a lot of time getting back to SF, you can jump on the Crest Line and be in Reno in six hours, versus about 15-16 getting back to SF.
                          > Finding info on "the crest line" isn't just as easy googling it (or maybe it is) . . . what you are really looking for is the Eastern Sierra Transit Authority:
                          > estransit.com
                          >
                          > You can catch the daily bus out of Lone Pine at 6:15 in the morning and be AT THE AIRPORT by noon.
                          > http://estransit.com/pages/bus-routes/crest--lone-pine-reno.php
                          >
                          > And as for expensive shuttles . . . don't bother getting one from Whitney Portal to Lone Pine. I'd hate to rob anyone there of an income but I bet they charge way too much for some old guy to come pick you up in his truck and thumbing off the portal is easy. If you're a group of three, trying to get down, then just split up and start walking, thumb out.
                          > Once you get in a car it's only about a 15 minute ride and the road takes you right to Lone Pine and 395 and the Dow Villa Motel is right there, hot tub and all.
                          > http://www.dowvillamotel.com/
                          > You can get an economy room (bathroom & shower down the hall) for about $55-60, two beds or one double; or you can go the high route for twice as much and get all the plumbing.
                          > If you need to get back to SF, then you take the same bus, but transfer in Mammoth to a YARTS bus, which then gets you into the Valley at about 1:30 p.m. and you then have to wait until 3 p.m. to catch the bus to Merced and then get on the train and get off in Emeryville, jump on a waiting bus and . . . you're back in SF around 10 p.m. or a little later.
                          >
                          > BOBhttp://www.summitpost.org/plans/view_activity.php?post_id=6480
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          > To: johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com
                          > From: cryofmercy@...
                          > Date: Wed, 18 Jan 2012 17:14:28 +0000
                          > Subject: [John Muir Trail] Re: Trip Planning
                          >
                          >
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                          >
                          > --- In johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com, "dmarleuk" <dmarleuk@> wrote:
                          >
                          > >
                          >
                          > > Hello there,
                          >
                          > > If my permit application works out then I'm planning a SOBO walk this summer. I'm hoping to fly into SF, spend a couple of nights there and then take the bus train combination out to Yosemite. I have a couple of questions:
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          > Three of us from east coast are planning to do JMT SOBO in early Sept. This thread has provided lots of great info already - and has convinced me the best bet on the front end is to fly to SFO or Oak, and take bus/train combo out to Yosemite.
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          > Like David, we're thinking about exiting Whitney Portal to Lone Pine, then heading to Reno for flights back home. Does anybody have any tips for the backside of the trip, like:
                          >
                          > 1) Is the CREST bus to Reno a reliable option (assuming we exit on the right days)?
                          >
                          > 2) If so, would you catch it from Lone Pine (via a connector bus), or shuttle up to Bishop or Mammoth from Whitney Portal to catch it there?
                          >
                          > 3) Or is it easier to get back to SFO somehow (all I've found are expensive shuttle/one-way car rental options so far)
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          > Thanks for all the informative posts so far.
                          >
                        • dmarleuk
                          Hello again, I ve been looking at accomodation in SF and specifically hostels. It actually looks like it would be closer to stay at the Union Square YH than
                          Message 12 of 26 , Jan 18, 2012
                            Hello again,
                            I've been looking at accomodation in SF and specifically hostels. It actually looks like it would be closer to stay at the Union Square YH than over in the park to the west of Fisherman's Wharf. It's seems to be close to Chinatown as well for a tasty dinner. Any ideas?

                            Thanks for the tip on Oakland - the cheaper hotels seem to be near the airport without easy access. I'll probably be away for 4 weeks so saving pennies (cents). Now at the end of the walk (if they let me in) that would be a different matter...
                            David
                          • robert shattuck
                            I ve been looking at accomodation in SF and specifically hostels. It actually looks like it would be closer to stay at the Union Square YH than over in the
                            Message 13 of 26 , Jan 18, 2012

                              "I've been looking at accomodation in SF and specifically hostels. It actually looks like it would be closer to stay at the Union Square YH than over in the park to the west of Fisherman's Wharf. It's seems to be close to Chinatown as well for a tasty dinner. Any ideas?" 

                              If you can book a hostel in Union Square, cheaply, go for it and you'll be close to everything as well as only having a morning walk to AMTRAK of about 20 minutes, if that . . . the thing about being anywhere else than downtown, right off Market street, is that you are taking a chance, should you use public transit––and catching a cab, early in the morning isn't always as easy as one thinks. 

                              Here's a nice place, that would be a step up from a hostel: http://www.thegoodhotel.com/

                              If you're looking for and willing to go to a hostel, then there are other hotels in the area that wold at least offer you more comfort, but like THE GOOD HOTEL, they're not in the very chic part of union square . . . 

                              http://www.renoirhotel.com/


                              BOB

                              http://www.summitpost.org/plans/view_activity.php?post_id=6480




                              To: johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com
                              From: dmarleuk@...
                              Date: Wed, 18 Jan 2012 19:12:03 +0000
                              Subject: [John Muir Trail] Re: Trip Planning . . . Fly into SF and out at Reno, why not . . .

                               
                              Hello again,
                              I've been looking at accomodation in SF and specifically hostels. It actually looks like it would be closer to stay at the Union Square YH than over in the park to the west of Fisherman's Wharf. It's seems to be close to Chinatown as well for a tasty dinner. Any ideas?

                              Thanks for the tip on Oakland - the cheaper hotels seem to be near the airport without easy access. I'll probably be away for 4 weeks so saving pennies (cents). Now at the end of the walk (if they let me in) that would be a different matter...
                              David


                            • Roleigh Martin
                              Robert s advice is nearly my own, but as I organize JMT groups, my advice is a little different. Very little. Hitch a ride to Lone Pine if you can, and it s
                              Message 14 of 26 , Jan 18, 2012
                                Robert's advice is nearly my own, but as I organize JMT groups, my advice is a little different.  Very little.

                                Hitch a ride to Lone Pine if you can, and it's very easy, most of the time you just ask as people are walking from the WP Store to their car.  But sometimes you're in a group big enough to enjoy a shuttle ride for peanuts.  One time, we were in 2 groups of hikers each seeking a way into Lone Pine and not that many cars around, so we called the shuttle, and they came up within 45 minutes and we got a ride to Lone Pine Dow Villa Motel for about $8 or $16 apiece (I can't remember which amount is right, for some odd reason, I was with a couple, and maybe the couple paid $16 and I paid $8).  The other times I did get a ride, so I only needed the shuttle once.  Mt. Whitney Shuttle Service (see crib sheet with link for it at bottom of every JMT Yahoo Group Posting).

                                I also think if you take the Bus from Lone Pine to Reno (we only did it once, you need to leave a voice message with the bus company indicating you'll be getting on the bus).  Double check what the web site says.  Remember, all links to transportation options and phone numbers are in the crib sheet.  Don't do a JMT without taking the one sheet of paper Crib Sheet (printed back-to-back to get it on one sheet of paper).

                                -------------------------------------------------
                                Visit Roleigh's Google Profile
                                _

                              • Don
                                ... It s not exactly such a high route except for Bob maybe. The rooms with a bath in the room is $72 including the remote control for the TV. Taking the
                                Message 15 of 26 , Jan 18, 2012
                                  > http://www.dowvillamotel.com/
                                  > You can get an economy room (bathroom & shower down the hall) for about $55-60, two beds or one double; or you can go the high route for twice as much and get all the plumbing.

                                  It's not exactly such a "high route" except for Bob maybe. The rooms with a bath in the room is $72 including the remote control for the TV. Taking the $56 a night no bath room is a kick though. There are not many hotels around anymore featuring a bath down the hall. I had the semi-deluxe last year with the bath directly across the hall. No wandering around in my skivvies in the middle of the night.

                                  Don
                                • ahhh_go
                                  Thanks Roleigh. Yes we ve discovered the crib sheet, have downloaded it, and will definitely carry it on the trip (printed on UL onion skin paper or something
                                  Message 16 of 26 , Jan 18, 2012
                                    Thanks Roleigh. Yes we've discovered the crib sheet, have downloaded it, and will definitely carry it on the trip (printed on UL onion skin paper or something :)

                                    --- In johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com, Roleigh Martin <roleigh@...> wrote:
                                    >
                                    > Robert's advice is nearly my own, but as I organize JMT groups, my advice
                                    > is a little different. Very little.
                                    >
                                    > Hitch a ride to Lone Pine if you can, and it's very easy, most of the time
                                    > you just ask as people are walking from the WP Store to their car. But
                                    > sometimes you're in a group big enough to enjoy a shuttle ride for
                                    > peanuts. One time, we were in 2 groups of hikers each seeking a way into
                                    > Lone Pine and not that many cars around, so we called the shuttle, and they
                                    > came up within 45 minutes and we got a ride to Lone Pine Dow Villa Motel
                                    > for about $8 or $16 apiece (I can't remember which amount is right, for
                                    > some odd reason, I was with a couple, and maybe the couple paid $16 and I
                                    > paid $8). The other times I did get a ride, so I only needed the shuttle
                                    > once. Mt. Whitney Shuttle Service (see crib sheet with link for it at
                                    > bottom of every JMT Yahoo Group Posting).
                                    >
                                    > I also think if you take the Bus from Lone Pine to Reno (we only did it
                                    > once, you need to leave a voice message with the bus company indicating
                                    > you'll be getting on the bus). Double check what the web site says.
                                    > Remember, all links to transportation options and phone numbers are in the
                                    > crib sheet. Don't do a JMT without taking the one sheet of paper Crib
                                    > Sheet (printed back-to-back to get it on one sheet of paper).
                                    >
                                    > -------------------------------------------------
                                    > Visit Roleigh's Google
                                    > Profile<https://profiles.google.com/104440166440169700478/about>
                                    > _
                                    >
                                  • concordiarunner
                                    I m planning on hiking the JMT this summer (for the first time). I consider myself fairly in shape, I m currently a college level cross country runner and a
                                    Message 17 of 26 , Mar 11, 2012
                                      I'm planning on hiking the JMT this summer (for the first time). I consider myself fairly in shape, I'm currently a college level cross country runner and a long-distance runner in track. I enjoy "long" hikes, but I've never done more than one overnight on the trail before, so I'm really excited. This probably sounds foolish to some of you, but I don't have that much time to get in the hike this summer, so I'm going to try and do it from Yosemite to Mt. Whitney in 12 days.

                                      I was wondering:
                                      1) What would be some suggested campsites if someone wants to do the trail in 12 days?

                                      2) Any other pointers for getting the best out of this experience on a limited budget and limited amount of time.

                                      Thank you
                                    • Robert
                                      To answer the question on whether the JMT is doable in 12 nights: yes. At an average of 17 + miles a day, that is very reasonable. We averaged almost 25 miles
                                      Message 18 of 26 , Mar 11, 2012
                                        To answer the question on whether the JMT is doable in 12 nights: yes. At an average of 17 + miles a day, that is very reasonable. We averaged almost 25 miles per day last year and were slogging through snowy passes and higher creek crossings than you will be facing this summer.

                                        As far as campsites go, there are too numerous to get into specifics here, but if you were to come up with a loose itinerary or what you want to do in terms of miles per day, I can give you some suggestions based on the area you might be hitting that evening.

                                        This is only an opinion on fastpacking from me, being in top shape is important, but it is more mental then physical in terms of being able to pull it off. It sounds like you probably have the fortitude through cross-country running to finish what you start, so that is a great trait to have for the JMT. If you go solo, there will be many times where it will be easy to talk yourself out of doing the whole trail, don't give in to those thoughts!

                                        Right now, I think the hardest part is picking a time and actually getting your permit. Many people that decide to do the JMT get discouraged when they start figuring out what a pain-in-the-butt logistics can be, but don't be discouraged by that.

                                        You can do the JMT relatively cheap using just one re-supply, ( MTR or VVR ), and hitching rides or using the bus system to get to or from your start or ending trailhead.

                                        You will get all kinds of good advice on this site. There are folks that have a lot of time out in the Sierras. Some are a little more 'traditional' and some focus on staying safe, but you can glean good information and tips from them all. I tend to lean towards the 'fast-packing' method and would be willing to give you any 'pointers' you would like on that as well. You can contact me any time if you have any specific questions.



                                        --- In johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com, "concordiarunner" <daniel.gibson@...> wrote:
                                        >
                                        > I'm planning on hiking the JMT this summer (for the first time). I consider myself fairly in shape, I'm currently a college level cross country runner and a long-distance runner in track. I enjoy "long" hikes, but I've never done more than one overnight on the trail before, so I'm really excited. This probably sounds foolish to some of you, but I don't have that much time to get in the hike this summer, so I'm going to try and do it from Yosemite to Mt. Whitney in 12 days.
                                        >
                                        > I was wondering:
                                        > 1) What would be some suggested campsites if someone wants to do the trail in 12 days?
                                        >
                                        > 2) Any other pointers for getting the best out of this experience on a limited budget and limited amount of time.
                                        >
                                        > Thank you
                                        >
                                      • Ron Cordell
                                        I believe that the list of campsites found in Elizabeth Wenk s book is in the files section for this group. It gives mileages and campsites. You can use this
                                        Message 19 of 26 , Mar 11, 2012
                                          I believe that the list of campsites found in Elizabeth Wenk's  book is in the files section for this group. It gives mileages and campsites. You can use this to give you an idea of what's around. 

                                          Typos by iPhone

                                          On Mar 11, 2012, at 2:05 PM, "concordiarunner" <daniel.gibson@...> wrote:

                                           

                                          I'm planning on hiking the JMT this summer (for the first time). I consider myself fairly in shape, I'm currently a college level cross country runner and a long-distance runner in track. I enjoy "long" hikes, but I've never done more than one overnight on the trail before, so I'm really excited. This probably sounds foolish to some of you, but I don't have that much time to get in the hike this summer, so I'm going to try and do it from Yosemite to Mt. Whitney in 12 days.

                                          I was wondering:
                                          1) What would be some suggested campsites if someone wants to do the trail in 12 days?

                                          2) Any other pointers for getting the best out of this experience on a limited budget and limited amount of time.

                                          Thank you

                                        • Mary
                                          this may have been mentioned before (I have not checked the list for a few months) but last year we found that many of the campsites we were planning to stop
                                          Message 20 of 26 , Mar 11, 2012
                                            this may have been mentioned before (I have not checked the list for a few months) but last year we found that many of the campsites we were planning to stop at had been closed by the park service for a variety of reasons. Many were either too close to the trail (ie at Lyell Fork Bridge, where the ranger made us move) or to close to a lake (many locations). This often made for quite a few more miles at the end of the day - doable but hard on this less than 25 mile a day hiker. Does anyone have updated campsite information?

                                            --- In johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com, Ron Cordell <ron.cordell@...> wrote:
                                            >
                                            > I believe that the list of campsites found in Elizabeth Wenk's book is in the files section for this group. It gives mileages and campsites. You can use this to give you an idea of what's around.
                                            >
                                            > Typos by iPhone
                                            >
                                            > On Mar 11, 2012, at 2:05 PM, "concordiarunner" <daniel.gibson@...> wrote:
                                            >
                                            > > I'm planning on hiking the JMT this summer (for the first time). I consider myself fairly in shape, I'm currently a college level cross country runner and a long-distance runner in track. I enjoy "long" hikes, but I've never done more than one overnight on the trail before, so I'm really excited. This probably sounds foolish to some of you, but I don't have that much time to get in the hike this summer, so I'm going to try and do it from Yosemite to Mt. Whitney in 12 days.
                                            > >
                                            > > I was wondering:
                                            > > 1) What would be some suggested campsites if someone wants to do the trail in 12 days?
                                            > >
                                            > > 2) Any other pointers for getting the best out of this experience on a limited budget and limited amount of time.
                                            > >
                                            > > Thank you
                                            > >
                                            > >
                                            >
                                          • John Ladd
                                            On Sun, Mar 11, 2012 at 2:05 PM, concordiarunner ... 1) What would be some suggested campsites if someone wants to do the trail in 12
                                            Message 21 of 26 , Mar 11, 2012
                                              On Sun, Mar 11, 2012 at 2:05 PM, concordiarunner <daniel.gibson@...> wrote:
                                               

                                              I was wondering:

                                                   1) What would be some suggested campsites if someone wants to do the trail in 12 days?

                                              If you are travelling solo and with a small footprint shelter (or sleeping under the sky on dry nights) you can camp just about anywhere. No need to find established sites.  You may want to eat near water, but no need to sleep near water (in fact, the water tends to have mosquitoes, while dry areas less so).  As it starts to get dark, look for benches (flat parts of a sideslope) above the trail or faint "use trails" that run at cross angles to the main trail.  You can usually find a large enough flat area for a sleeping pad and bag or bivy about 100 feet from the trail.  The rules don't require you to stay at established sites (as long as you don't try to make a campfire or disturb fragile vegetation).

                                              John Curran Ladd
                                              1616 Castro Street
                                              San Francisco, CA  94114-3707
                                              415-648-9279



                                            • charliepolecat
                                              That s my plan, sleeping where ever I find myself.
                                              Message 22 of 26 , Mar 11, 2012
                                                That's my plan, sleeping where ever I find myself.



                                                --- In johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com, John Ladd <johnladd@...> wrote:
                                                >
                                                > On Sun, Mar 11, 2012 at 2:05 PM, concordiarunner <daniel.gibson@...>
                                                > wrote:
                                                >
                                                > > **
                                                > >
                                                > >
                                                > > I was wondering:
                                                > >
                                                > 1) What would be some suggested campsites if someone wants to do the
                                                > trail in 12 days?
                                                >
                                                > If you are travelling solo and with a small footprint shelter (or sleeping
                                                > under the sky on dry nights) you can camp just about anywhere. No need to
                                                > find established sites. You may want to eat near water, but no need to
                                                > sleep near water (in fact, the water tends to have mosquitoes, while dry
                                                > areas less so). As it starts to get dark, look for benches (flat parts of
                                                > a sideslope) above the trail or faint "use trails" that run at cross angles
                                                > to the main trail. You can usually find a large enough flat area for a
                                                > sleeping pad and bag or bivy about 100 feet from the trail. The rules
                                                > don't require you to stay at established sites (as long as you don't try to
                                                > make a campfire or disturb fragile vegetation).
                                                >
                                                > John Curran Ladd
                                                > 1616 Castro Street
                                                > San Francisco, CA 94114-3707
                                                > 415-648-9279
                                                >
                                                >
                                                >
                                                > >
                                                >
                                              • concordiarunner
                                                Thank you very much, I ll check those out
                                                Message 23 of 26 , Mar 11, 2012
                                                  Thank you very much, I'll check those out


                                                  --- In johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com, Ron Cordell <ron.cordell@...> wrote:
                                                  >
                                                  > I believe that the list of campsites found in Elizabeth Wenk's book is in the files section for this group. It gives mileages and campsites. You can use this to give you an idea of what's around.
                                                  >
                                                  > Typos by iPhone
                                                  >
                                                  > On Mar 11, 2012, at 2:05 PM, "concordiarunner" <daniel.gibson@...> wrote:
                                                  >
                                                  > > I'm planning on hiking the JMT this summer (for the first time). I consider myself fairly in shape, I'm currently a college level cross country runner and a long-distance runner in track. I enjoy "long" hikes, but I've never done more than one overnight on the trail before, so I'm really excited. This probably sounds foolish to some of you, but I don't have that much time to get in the hike this summer, so I'm going to try and do it from Yosemite to Mt. Whitney in 12 days.
                                                  > >
                                                  > > I was wondering:
                                                  > > 1) What would be some suggested campsites if someone wants to do the trail in 12 days?
                                                  > >
                                                  > > 2) Any other pointers for getting the best out of this experience on a limited budget and limited amount of time.
                                                  > >
                                                  > > Thank you
                                                  > >
                                                  > >
                                                  >
                                                • robert shattuck
                                                  As has been noted, if you can find a flat spot on the JMT, you can pretty much camp there and there are really very few places that are off-limits––and
                                                  Message 24 of 26 , Mar 11, 2012
                                                    As has been noted, if you can find a "flat" spot on the JMT, you can pretty much camp there and there are really very few places that are off-limits––and they are all well-marked, such as the restoration areas around the north end of Dollar Lake, or at Guitar Lake. 

                                                    Yosemite: Once you leave LYV there's no place to camp, official or otherwise until you pass the HD junction . . . sure you might spy something off in the distance, but if you happen to be hiking in the dark, you'll never know. Even once you get past the HD junction, it's really hard in the dark to figure out where to pull off the trail and without daylight or prior knowledge, you might be looking all night, but there are plenty of discreet spots just about ten minutes or so past the HD junction. 


                                                    There is no camping for the first five or so miles heading up Lyell Canyon––you can camp officially once you get past the Vogelsang Junctoin, but Lyell is also bear country, so I would urge you to get as high up as possible. Once you get up into the switch-backs you can camp there at the "horse bridge" but it's loud with water and heavy with trees and bugs––I like to be able to see and hear things, like bears. 

                                                    Fifteen minutes past the Horse Bridge, you hit a lovely open meadow, with lots of space, but again, it seems to be a bug haven. If you just cross the stream and go up another 15-20 minutes you are, in my opinion, and experience, above the bears and bugs and there are spots around the lake there and up in the rocks. Not bad views either.

                                                    Once you get over Donahue and out of Yosemite, you might think about camping at Thousand Island Lakes, but this is another area where you can't just plunk down anywhere and they usually have signs posted, telling you where not to camp . . . Shadow Lake––I think that's also posted as a restoration area. 

                                                    Between Reds and the VVR, I've only ever seen restoration signs at Purple Lake, but those were just at the outlet/bridge area. When you come down into Purple, there are spots right there, pretty sure, before you make the right and follow the edge of the lake to the bridge. 

                                                    Aside from areas marked, "no camping" I wouldn't want to stay in places with lots of mosquitos and if I was sitting up at Virginia, but thinking I'd like to put in another few miles, well, I wouldn't want to go down into Tully Hole, or any of the lower meadows, once I got to climbing up towards Squaw/papoose/chief. BUGS. 

                                                    If you were to leave the VVR in the evening, thinking you might put in some miles, I'd squash that thought. Some people get on the evening boat just to get out of the $$VVR$$, but they stay right there at the boat dock, or they go as far as Quail Meadows, otherwise they risk an evening climb up the switch-backs to Bear Ridge and while there might be plenty of spots to drop your pack and camp (nothing really designated or comfy as I recall) there's no water, but once you get down to Bear Creek there are plenty of spots and lots of water. 

                                                    There are a number of camp spots that are also used by the packers, so for instance, if you got to the bridge at Piute and crossed over––that area to the right is often where the animals are at night and if you get there in the dark and aren't too careful, you might set up over an old pile of . . . just sayin' . . . 

                                                    This is another stretch, between the Piute Junction and Franklin Meadow . . . there are a few spots down and very near the water, but you'd have to get down to them and if you're not into loud water all night . . . otherwise you have to head down the trail and there's nothing remotely camp-able until you cross the next bridge. then there are a number of spots off to the right, between the trail and the water. nice flat spots. 

                                                    Or you go down, cross the next bridge and there is again a large flat area for camping, either in the open or in the trees. I think they keep the horses in the open area most times. 

                                                    Evolution Valley has plenty of fine camp spots and a few posted areas, not to mention, a ranger to help you out. DO NOT camp in the vicinity of the ranger cabin. I think it is posted, no camping

                                                    I could go on . . . foot by foot . . . but really, other than Dollar and Guitar Lake, I don't think there are any other areas (Rae Lakes has some areas marked for no camping, but there's still lots to be had) where you can't use common sense and the rules . . . oddly enough there are lots and lots of camp sites that seem to not be "100 feet" from water, or the edge of a trail . . . 

                                                    If you should decide to camp at the fine little lake on Bighorn Plateau, do not camp on the grass, or really any grass you find, but, ha ha, I once told some campers––three tents!––that they should move and sure enough, the ranger showed up and then they had to move. It's a magic area. 

                                                    There are just so many spots that you pass, usually in the middle of the day, thinking, wow, wouldn't this be a great spot to watch the sun go down, . . . I still haven't stayed in all of them. 


                                                    BOB
                                                    http://www.summitpost.org/plans/view_activity.php?post_id=6480




                                                    To: johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com
                                                    From: mousewiz@...
                                                    Date: Mon, 12 Mar 2012 00:51:22 +0000
                                                    Subject: [John Muir Trail] Re: Trip Planning

                                                     

                                                    this may have been mentioned before (I have not checked the list for a few months) but last year we found that many of the campsites we were planning to stop at had been closed by the park service for a variety of reasons. Many were either too close to the trail (ie at Lyell Fork Bridge, where the ranger made us move) or to close to a lake (many locations). This often made for quite a few more miles at the end of the day - doable but hard on this less than 25 mile a day hiker. Does anyone have updated campsite information?

                                                    --- In johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com, Ron Cordell <ron.cordell@...> wrote:
                                                    >
                                                    > I believe that the list of campsites found in Elizabeth Wenk's book is in the files section for this group. It gives mileages and campsites. You can use this to give you an idea of what's around.
                                                    >
                                                    > Typos by iPhone
                                                    >
                                                    > On Mar 11, 2012, at 2:05 PM, "concordiarunner" <daniel.gibson@...> wrote:
                                                    >
                                                    > > I'm planning on hiking the JMT this summer (for the first time). I consider myself fairly in shape, I'm currently a college level cross country runner and a long-distance runner in track. I enjoy "long" hikes, but I've never done more than one overnight on the trail before, so I'm really excited. This probably sounds foolish to some of you, but I don't have that much time to get in the hike this summer, so I'm going to try and do it from Yosemite to Mt. Whitney in 12 days.
                                                    > >
                                                    > > I was wondering:
                                                    > > 1) What would be some suggested campsites if someone wants to do the trail in 12 days?
                                                    > >
                                                    > > 2) Any other pointers for getting the best out of this experience on a limited budget and limited amount of time.
                                                    > >
                                                    > > Thank you
                                                    > >
                                                    > >
                                                    >


                                                  • M L
                                                    Our son solo hiked the length of the JMT in 12 days at the age of 17 in 1998. And he was fit (lots of walking around town) but not athletic. The key seemed
                                                    Message 25 of 26 , Mar 11, 2012
                                                      Our son solo hiked the length of the JMT in 12 days at the age of 17 in 1998.  And he was fit (lots of walking around town) but not athletic.  The key seemed to be that he just kept walking.  Dawn (or sometimes before) to dusk.  Originally he planned on 14 days but  it didn't take him that long.  He did run out of food near the end.  And said later he would have preferred to have a companion.

                                                      You probably will want to practice your overnight camping skills in the months leading up to the trip.  Take yourself on weekend campouts often, to test out your kit and your skills.  You should be fine.

                                                      Mina


                                                      To: johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com
                                                      From: daniel.gibson@...
                                                      Date: Sun, 11 Mar 2012 21:05:07 +0000
                                                      Subject: [John Muir Trail] Trip Planning

                                                       
                                                      I'm planning on hiking the JMT this summer (for the first time). I consider myself fairly in shape, I'm currently a college level cross country runner and a long-distance runner in track. I enjoy "long" hikes, but I've never done more than one overnight on the trail before, so I'm really excited. This probably sounds foolish to some of you, but I don't have that much time to get in the hike this summer, so I'm going to try and do it from Yosemite to Mt. Whitney in 12 days.

                                                      I was wondering:
                                                      1) What would be some suggested campsites if someone wants to do the trail in 12 days?

                                                      2) Any other pointers for getting the best out of this experience on a limited budget and limited amount of time.

                                                      Thank you


                                                    • jamesrchristopherson
                                                      I want to say thank you for the recent messages posted which I have been noting for my 2014 trip planning. I uploaded my initial gear list with the weights of
                                                      Message 26 of 26 , Oct 3, 2013

                                                        I want to say thank you for the recent messages posted which I have been noting for my 2014 trip planning. 

                                                         

                                                        I uploaded my initial gear list with the weights of the items in the gear list section.  if anyone has any thoughts on items please post a message to me.  I do need to get a new tent and want to get some lighter gear to drop some weight of items. 

                                                         

                                                        Thank you again for the trip planning tips.

                                                         

                                                        James

                                                         

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