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Re: [John Muir Trail] Predictive value of early winter snowpack

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  • Roleigh Martin
    I figure the one water supply lost that I d hate to see go is the undocumented water supply about 45-50 up the hill (going south) from Quail Meadows (there
    Message 1 of 10 , Jan 2, 2012
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      I figure the one water supply lost that I'd hate to see go is the undocumented water supply about 45-50" up the hill (going south) from Quail Meadows (there are 3 points of the trail where you can hear a creek (normally) about 50-100 feet to the left of lefthand corners of switchbacks).  You don't see water on the maps or the books at this point, and so many bulk up with water from Quail Meadows to Bear Ridge Creek as it is a very long stretch, but there has always been water there for me about 45 to 50" minutes up the trail.
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    • Matt Ruby
      If you hike at even a modest hiking pace 1 mile per hour, you should have no problem finding water.  I did an October hike in 2008, a dry year, and had no
      Message 2 of 10 , Jan 2, 2012
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        If you hike at even a modest hiking pace 1 mile per hour, you should have no problem finding water.  I did an October hike in 2008, a dry year, and had no issues.  Just make sure you camel up before the passes.
        Cheers,
        Matt
        JMT 08, 09, 11     

        --- On Mon, 1/2/12, John Ladd <johnladd@...> wrote:

        From: John Ladd <johnladd@...>
        Subject: Re: [John Muir Trail] Predictive value of early winter snowpack
        To: johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com
        Date: Monday, January 2, 2012, 11:37 PM

         


        On Mon, Jan 2, 2012 at 1:58 PM, Roleigh Martin <roleigh@...> wrote:
         

        ... John, any clue on what water resupply points on the JMT are not there in a super dry year in Mid-July to Late August?


        I don't really have any great experience hiking JMT in dry years, but there is so much water readily available on the JMT, I have a hard time believing it would be much of a problem.  If hiking South, you can always ask people hiking North when they last crossed water.  And the many lakes along the trail aren't going to go dry

      • trail2nowhere
        Here s what I m talking about http://www.tahoebonanza.com/article/20120103/NEWS/120109988/1061&ParentProfile=1050
        Message 3 of 10 , Jan 4, 2012
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          Here's what I'm talking about
          http://www.tahoebonanza.com/article/20120103/NEWS/120109988/1061&ParentProfile=1050


          --- In johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com, Matt Ruby <mattruby@...> wrote:
          >
          > If you hike at even a modest hiking pace 1 mile per hour, you should have no problem finding water.  I did an October hike in 2008, a dry year, and had no issues.  Just make sure you camel up before the passes.Cheers,MattJMT 08, 09, 11     
          >
          > --- On Mon, 1/2/12, John Ladd <johnladd@...> wrote:
          >
          > From: John Ladd <johnladd@...>
          > Subject: Re: [John Muir Trail] Predictive value of early winter snowpack
          > To: johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com
          > Date: Monday, January 2, 2012, 11:37 PM
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          > On Mon, Jan 2, 2012 at 1:58 PM, Roleigh Martin <roleigh@...> wrote:
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          > ... John, any clue on what water resupply points on the JMT are not there in a super dry year in Mid-July to Late August?
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          > I don't really have any great experience hiking JMT in dry years, but
          > there is so much water readily available on the JMT, I have a hard time
          > believing it would be much of a problem.  If hiking South, you can always ask people hiking North when they last crossed water.  And the many lakes along the trail aren't going to go dry
          >
        • John Ladd
          Accuweather is starting to predict some snowfall for the week of Jan 15 http://www.accuweather.com/us/ca/yosemite-national-park/95389/forecast-month.asp We can
          Message 4 of 10 , Jan 6, 2012
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            Accuweather is starting to predict some snowfall for the week of Jan 15

            http://www.accuweather.com/us/ca/yosemite-national-park/95389/forecast-month.asp

            We can hope

            Weather.com only does a 10-day forecast and it does not include any snow

            http://www.weather.com/weather/tenday/Yosemite+National+Park+CA+CANPYOSE:13

            John Curran Ladd
            1616 Castro Street
            San Francisco, CA  94114-3707
            415-648-9279


          • Mark Liechty
            ... Seems the weather people are never very reliable. Lot of reasons but it is what it is. John on the other hand has proven to be very reliable in my time
            Message 5 of 10 , Jan 6, 2012
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              On Jan 6, 2012, at 6:28 AM, John Ladd wrote:
              Weather.com only does a 10-day forecast and it does not include any snow 
              #########

              Seems the weather people are never very reliable.   Lot of reasons but it is what it is.

              John on the other hand has proven to be very reliable in my time lurking on this list.

              Sooooo lets solve the problem once and for all.

              I move that we vote to have John be responsible for getting us the needed levels of snow in the Sierra within the next couple of weeks.

              Do I get a second for the motion?


              Mark "Blankie" Liechty
            • Matt
              I hiked the trail in 2007, which was a very dry year. I don t remember having any long stretches without access to water. The longest I can remember was Deer
              Message 6 of 10 , Jan 6, 2012
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                I hiked the trail in 2007, which was a very dry year.

                I don't remember having any long stretches without access to water. The longest I can remember was Deer Creek to Duck Creek (but that is often without water in any event).

                The only real practical neagive I remember was the extra mile or so (seemed like 5 miles) through the mud to get to the VVR ferry, as Lake Edison was substantially low (of course, this isn't technically on the JMT).

                I suppose I'm sort of a wimp but I actually prefer dry years because, in prime season (late July through early September), three aspects of the hike are substantially easier: (1) stream crossings; (2) going over passes; and (3) dealing with mossies. I agree that the hike is somewhat less scenic in dry years, but the High Sierras are already so scenic to begin with.
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