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Naive question - permits North of Yosemite?

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  • Wilderness
    OK, I liked the JMT so much that I want to hike the next section of the PCT, North from Tuolumne. My naive question for the day is - what permits are needed
    Message 1 of 7 , Dec 24, 2011
      OK, I liked the JMT so much that I want to hike the next section of the PCT, North from Tuolumne. My naive question for the day is - what permits are needed for this section (from Tuolumne, and about 200 miles to the North)? What are your suggestions regarding trip preparation (e.g., caches, resupply, water/insect issues, best time to hike, bear container considerations, etc.)?
      Thanks, and Happy Solstice to All, Rob of the WV

      commercial-free, yet now on facebook as:

      http://www.facebook.com/WildernessVagabond
    • Kim Fishburn
      I ve done the Tahoe Yosemite trail which follows the PCT for part of the route. I did vary from the route at Sonora Pass. The TYT is suppose to follow the road
      Message 2 of 7 , Dec 24, 2011
        I've done the Tahoe Yosemite trail which follows the PCT for part of the route. I did vary from the route at Sonora Pass. The TYT is suppose to follow the road about 10 miles to Kennedy Meadows. Instead I hiked the half mile up to the pass and took the PCT south. Its now one of my favorites. Kennedy Meadows resort supposedly still accepts packages for hikers but it no longer says anything on their website.  http://www.kennedymeadows.com/  Lake Alpine Resort on highway 4 has also accepted packages in the past but I'd contact them to check out. There is plenty of traffic on Highway 4 so you should be able to hitchhike there.  http://www.lakealpineresort.com/index.html  Just north of Highway 50 is Echo Lakes which has a small store and a post office. They don't have much space and when I talked to them they asked that you not send any big packages. Its been quite a while since I was there so I don't know if anything has changed. Except for Yosemite bears haven't been much of a problem. The east to west section of the PCT in northern Yosemite is considered by some to be one of the tougher sections of the PCT but I do like it. For example, the section from Benson Lake to Seavy Pass is steeper than others, and no shade.

        I've had some great experiences in the north of Yosemite. I camped next to a fallen log at Benson Lake and shortly after I fell asleep something woke me with what sounded like a human screaming. I didn't near it again so I went back to sleep. Every time I woke I heard this screeching noise in the woods. I'm pretty sure it was a Screech Owl, and the first time it was probably sitting on the roots of the fallen tree I was sleeping next to. I've seen a bobcat in Spiller Canyon, and that is also what probably screamed near my tent in Cold Canyon. 

        Kim


        From: Wilderness <wildvagabond@...>
        To: johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com
        Sent: Saturday, December 24, 2011 10:27 AM
        Subject: [John Muir Trail] Naive question - permits North of Yosemite?

         
        OK, I liked the JMT so much that I want to hike the next section of the PCT, North from Tuolumne. My naive question for the day is - what permits are needed for this section (from Tuolumne, and about 200 miles to the North)? What are your suggestions regarding trip preparation (e.g., caches, resupply, water/insect issues, best time to hike, bear container considerations, etc.)?
        Thanks, and Happy Solstice to All, Rob of the WV

        commercial-free, yet now on facebook as:

        http://www.facebook.com/WildernessVagabond



      • John Ladd
        Rob -- I ve hiked the first 75 or so miles of your route (Tuolumne to Sonora Pass) and various parts of the next 125. Lots of quite nice country that I think
        Message 3 of 7 , Dec 24, 2011
          Rob --

          I've hiked the first 75 or so miles of your route (Tuolumne to Sonora Pass) and various parts of the next 125.  Lots of quite nice country that I think you will like. One long dry stretch just short of I-80 (North Lake Tahoe).

          Entry permit would be from Yosemite NP.  I don't know if that one permit would then be sufficient for the rest of the trip.  Biggest problem (if the Yosemite permit is not honored throughout) will be Desolation Wilderness, an extremely popular area.  I suggest you give a call to the

          PACIFIC RANGER DISTRICT
          7887 Highway 50, Pollock Pines, CA 95726
          Phone: (530) 647-5415
          Winter: Weekdays only. Monday through Saturday as of late April.
          Summer: 7 days a week, 8:00 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. through October.

          to ask them if your Yosemite-issued permit will cover you in Desolation.  My guess is "yes" but it is only a guess.

          If you need a separate permit for Desolation, you can get it at recreation.gov

          See

          http://www.fs.fed.us/r5/eldorado/recreation/wild/deso/permit/

          and

          http://www.fs.fed.us/r5/eldorado/documents/other/HowtoDWpermit.pdf

          You should also get yourself a California campfire permit.

          This site

          http://www.fs.fed.us/r5/sequoia/passespermits/campfire_permit/campfire-index.html

          issues a CA campfire permit you can self-print after answering a few incredibly over-simplified questions.  (Page says it will issue a 2010 permit but resulting permit in fact is dated for 2011.  I assume they will update it for 2012 soon.)

          Pacific Crest Trail Association issues permits that are honored (grudgingly, sometimes) by all jurisdictions along the PCT but you are supposed to request one from PCTA only if you plan to cover at least 500 continuous miles of the PCT in one year.  Some areas will give you trouble if you are on a side trail, taking the position that the PCTA permit will be honored only for the PCT itself, not for sidetrips (even logical ones).

          http://www.pcta.org/planning/before_trip/permits.asp

          One very easy resupply point along your route is the seasonal post office at Echo Lake (152 miles N of Tuolumne).  It's right on the PCT itself.  I might be willing to meet you at Sonora Pass (77 trial miles N of Tuolumne) with a resupply and -- if you can stand my company again -- join you for the Sonora Pass to Echo Lake section (I'd probably do it as a RT Sonora Pass to Echo and return).  I owe you a return favor after all you taught me about the Grand Canyon.

          http://www.echochalet.com/services.htm

          You will need a bearcan.  Maybe not for every mile of the trip, but for enough of it that you might as well plan to carry for the whole thing.

          PCT throughhikers will be coming through that area in mid-July and it's kinda fun to be hiking with them around.  If it's a dry year, might be best to avoid August as some of the water sources in the Granite Chief section are somewhat sporadic.  There is one high point of the trail at PCT mile 1013.2 just South of Sonora Pass where you need to come down a long North-facing slope and its snow clears late, so you probably want to avoid June and maybe early July.

          Mosquitoes sometimes bad, sometimes not.  All depends on where you sleep and how the particular year winds up.

          John Curran Ladd
          1616 Castro Street
          San Francisco, CA  94114-3707
          415-648-9279


          On Sat, Dec 24, 2011 at 8:27 AM, Wilderness <wildvagabond@...> wrote:
           

          OK, I liked the JMT so much that I want to hike the next section of the PCT, North from Tuolumne. My naive question for the day is - what permits are needed for this section (from Tuolumne, and about 200 miles to the North)? What are your suggestions regarding trip preparation (e.g., caches, resupply, water/insect issues, best time to hike, bear container considerations, etc.)?
          Thanks, and Happy Solstice to All, Rob of the WV

          commercial-free, yet now on facebook as:

          http://www.facebook.com/WildernessVagabond


        • Kim Fishburn
          When I hiked the Tahoe Yosemite trail southbound I got one permit at the ranger station at South Lake Tahoe that was good for the whole hike. This was in 1988
          Message 4 of 7 , Dec 25, 2011
            When I hiked the Tahoe Yosemite trail southbound I got one permit at the ranger station at South Lake Tahoe that was good for the whole hike. This was in 1988 so things may have changed. Anytime I've gotten a permit from outside of Yosemite but was planning on entering the park from another wilderness that ranger office took care of everything.

            Kim
          • Wilderness
            Thanks Kim and John for the information. Thanks, John, for the offer of a resupply and some company. This is very gracious and potentially a terrific trip
            Message 5 of 7 , Dec 26, 2011
              Thanks Kim and John for the information. Thanks, John, for the offer of a resupply and some company. This is very gracious and potentially a terrific trip enhancement. I hope we (Dave and I) can work out the logistics and the time and stuff and do the next section N from Yosemite. Will be responding as we work out the details. Rob

              --- In johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com, Kim Fishburn <outhiking_55@...> wrote:
              >
              > When I hiked the Tahoe Yosemite trail southbound I got one permit at the ranger station at South Lake Tahoe that was good for the whole hike. This was in 1988 so things may have changed. Anytime I've gotten a permit from outside of Yosemite but was planning on entering the park from another wilderness that ranger office took care of everything.
              >
              >
              > Kim
              >
            • LEBRUN
              I hiked this route summer 2011 with my eighteen year old son. If you want details more details (e.g., food resupply, transportation, route description) let me
              Message 6 of 7 , Dec 31, 2011
                I hiked this route summer 2011 with my eighteen year old son.

                If you want details more details (e.g., food resupply, transportation, route description) let me know.

                Bruce




                On Mon, Dec 26, 2011 at 5:07 PM, Wilderness <wildvagabond@...> wrote:
                 


                Thanks Kim and John for the information. Thanks, John, for the offer of a resupply and some company. This is very gracious and potentially a terrific trip enhancement. I hope we (Dave and I) can work out the logistics and the time and stuff and do the next section N from Yosemite. Will be responding as we work out the details. Rob

                --- In johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com, Kim Fishburn <outhiking_55@...> wrote:
                >
                > When I hiked the Tahoe Yosemite trail southbound I got one permit at the ranger station at South Lake Tahoe that was good for the whole hike. This was in 1988 so things may have changed. Anytime I've gotten a permit from outside of Yosemite but was planning on entering the park from another wilderness that ranger office took care of everything.
                >
                >
                > Kim
                >


              • trail2nowhere
                The section between rescue creek and jack man canyon is called the washboards because it goes east-west across the Sierra s north south ridges. The lower
                Message 7 of 7 , Jan 2, 2012
                  The section between rescue creek and jack man canyon is called the washboards because it goes east-west across the Sierra's north south ridges. The lower altitudes also result in warmer temps. Resupply at Kennedy meadows north (there are 2 Kennedy meadows on the pct). Kennedy meadows north is very backpacker friendly and they will put you up in the bunkhouse for a very fair price if you say you are a pct hiker.

                  You will run out of granite about 15 miles before Sonora pass and not see it again until echo summit (your next resupply-echo summit lodge). Without the granite that mean that water goes straight down into the ground and there aren't as many water. This is a dryer section of the trail.

                  After echo resupply at donner summit. I think that is the Claire Tappan lodge ran by the Sierra club.

                  check out the PCTA website for more details.

                  Jack

                  --- In johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com, "Wilderness" <wildvagabond@...> wrote:
                  >
                  > OK, I liked the JMT so much that I want to hike the next section of the PCT, North from Tuolumne. My naive question for the day is - what permits are needed for this section (from Tuolumne, and about 200 miles to the North)? What are your suggestions regarding trip preparation (e.g., caches, resupply, water/insect issues, best time to hike, bear container considerations, etc.)?
                  > Thanks, and Happy Solstice to All, Rob of the WV
                  >
                  > commercial-free, yet now on facebook as:
                  >
                  > http://www.facebook.com/WildernessVagabond
                  >
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