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They Keep Shrinking: Smaller & Lighter PLB From DME

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  • Roleigh
    FYI. Around the corner. Sent to you by Roleigh via Google Reader: They Keep Shrinking: Smaller & Lighter PLB From DME via Doug Ritter s Equipped.org Blog by
    Message 1 of 5 , Dec 9, 2011
      FYI. Around the corner.

       
       

      Sent to you by Roleigh via Google Reader:

       
       

      via Doug Ritter's Equipped.org Blog by dritter on 12/9/11

      (Click images for higher resolution photos)

      SARTO PLB-110A new entrant in the PLB wars is claiming to be the world’s smallest and lightest Personal Locator Beacon, eclipsing the current record holder in this regard, the ACR ResQLink which was just introduced earlier this year. Slated to be available in Spring of 2012, the new SATRO PLB-110 from Astronics DME Corporation certainly seems to have a good basis for that claim at just 4.09 x 2.39 x 0.92 inches (104 x 61 x 23 mm) and only 4.3 oz. (122 g).

      While not a name familiar to most consumers, DME has been making aviation ELTs (Emergency Locator Transmitters) for 20 years with a reputation for quality and robust products. You will find many of their emergency products installed on most airliners. SATRO is a new brand name for their consumer oriented products, derived from the parent company’s NASDAQ symbol “ATRO,” of which the PLB-110 is the first.

      Unlike the other pocket-sized PLBs introduced to date, McMurdo’s Fast Find Model 210 and ACR’s ResQLink, the SATRO PLB-110 is inherently buoyant. While not an essential feature in my opinion, you should always have the PLB tethered to you if flying over water, that’s a pretty neat trick in such a small package. No need for a “float coat” to slip on to provide flotation.

      SARTO PLB-110I had the opportunity to handle a prototype and the flat form factor, clearly modeled on the iPhone, makes it very much more pocketable than its competition. The antenna wraps around the body, similar to the ACR designs.

      It is equipped with a current generation 66-channel integral GPS, full GPS test function, and a flashing LED. The clear top case has a Fresnel lens molded over the LED to help spread that light wider. I’ll be interested in seeing exactly how effective that is in the real world.

      Thet PLB-110 is rated to transmit at a minimum of 5 watts throught it’s battery life and it is rated for 24 hours at -20C (-4F). Its depth rating is 10 meters (32.8 ft) for 5 minutes and 1 meter (3.28 ft) for an hour.

      The MSRP is expected to be $299, so street price should be competitive with the McMurdo and ACR.

      NOTE: This device has not been authorized as required by the Rules of the FCC. This device is not, and may not be offered for sale or lease, or sold or leased, until authorization is obtained.


       
       

      Things you can do from here:

       
       
    • charliepolecat
      This desire to be found whilst in the mountains seems to defy the purpose.
      Message 2 of 5 , Dec 9, 2011
        This desire to be 'found' whilst in the mountains seems to defy the purpose.
      • Roleigh Martin
        Charlie, sometimes one s purposes changes from (a) being in the mountains to (b) staying alive. The one JMT hike I remember when a Spot 911 message went out
        Message 3 of 5 , Dec 9, 2011
          Charlie, sometimes one's purposes changes from (a) being in the mountains to (b) staying alive.

          The one JMT hike I remember when a Spot 911 message went out (discussed by someone in the Yahoo group [I read about it when I was a member of the SEKI  hiking Yahoo Group] and I met a ranger who was familiar with the emergency), the Spot was used because one of the JMT hikers had an appendectomy.  Because of the Spot, he did get on the operating table within 12 hours.  The doctors told him he'd have probably died if he had not been operated on so fast.

          For only 3 ounces of insurance, it's not going to weigh people down too much.  

          I agree, it should not be used unless its for a real emergency purpose and such emergencies should not be due to stupidity (or minimally due to stupidity).

          Roleigh

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          On Fri, Dec 9, 2011 at 2:36 PM, charliepolecat <kennethjessett@...> wrote:
           

          This desire to be 'found' whilst in the mountains seems to defy the purpose.


        • Roleigh Martin
          My bad, I was teased offline. The hiker had an Appendicitis
          Message 4 of 5 , Dec 9, 2011
            My bad, I was teased offline.  The hiker had an Appendicitis on the trail and in the hospital, he had an Appendectomy.

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            On Fri, Dec 9, 2011 at 5:50 PM, Roleigh Martin <roleigh@...> wrote:
            Charlie, sometimes one's purposes changes from (a) being in the mountains to (b) staying alive.

            The one JMT hike I remember when a Spot 911 message went out (discussed by someone in the Yahoo group [I read about it when I was a member of the SEKI  hiking Yahoo Group] and I met a ranger who was familiar with the emergency), the Spot was used because one of the JMT hikers had an appendectomy.  Because of the Spot, he did get on the operating table within 12 hours.  The doctors told him he'd have probably died if he had not been operated on so fast.

            For only 3 ounces of insurance, it's not going to weigh people down too much.  

            I agree, it should not be used unless its for a real emergency purpose and such emergencies should not be due to stupidity (or minimally due to stupidity).

            Roleigh

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            On Fri, Dec 9, 2011 at 2:36 PM, charliepolecat <kennethjessett@...> wrote:
             

            This desire to be 'found' whilst in the mountains seems to defy the purpose.



          • charliepolecat
            Roleigh, When I m in the mountains - and just about anywhere else - I m like Garbo; I just want to be alone. And I have enough self assurance when I m off on
            Message 5 of 5 , Dec 9, 2011
              Roleigh,

              When I'm in the mountains - and just about anywhere else - I'm like Garbo; I just want to be alone. And I have enough self assurance when I'm off on my own that I do not need a security blanket.

              Although, I'm happy that the number of hikers who clog the permit office each year seem to indicate there are many in todays', 'Connected World' that are willing to forgo the comforts of Best Buy and trek out into the wilderness, even of they have to lug a 3 oz. 'help' device with them to do it. :-)
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