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RE: [John Muir Trail] Tevas as stream crossing footwear . . . NOT REQUIRED READING . . .

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    P. S. Our HI WP permit reservation is for July 25-August 15. To: johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com From: minafall2004_7@hotmail.com Date: Fri, 27 May 2011 04:15:03
    Message 1 of 20 , May 26, 2011
      P. S. Our HI>WP permit reservation is for July 25-August 15.


      To: johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com
      From: minafall2004_7@...
      Date: Fri, 27 May 2011 04:15:03 +0000
      Subject: RE: [John Muir Trail] Tevas as stream crossing footwear . . . NOT REQUIRED READING . . .

       
      Bob,

      Well, the JMT will be our longest hike ever.  But we have hiked the Wonderland Trail (93 miles/10 days around Mt. Rainier, including some high passes with snow), Big Bend Ranch (west Texas desert mountains west of the national park), Pecos Wilderness in New Mexico (multiple trips, sometimes snow and mud, sometimes not), Guadalupe Mts. National Park (multiple trips), and a bunch of smaller weekend places in central Texas, all in trail runners (mainly Vasque Blur, my feet seem to like them).  The Texas destinations (especially Guadalupe and Big Bend) are probably the roughest, all broken up limestone and some granite, stickers and snakes.  

      I used to wear REI Spirit IV's but they have languished in my closet for about 4 years now, since I've had no trouble with the trail runners, which are much less bulky feeling on my feet.  Of course they don't last as long as the boots, but I haven't had any fall apart.  I don't tend to twist ankles particularly.  So I no longer see any advantage to hiking in clunky boots.

      Actually I don't plan to bring the sandals on the trail since they can't be my only shoes.  One pair of trail runners should do it.  I was just dreaming.  About my toes being free, that is.

      I have been gradually winnowing my kit down by taking stock after each trip of what gear contributed to the trip (or to background safety) and what was just dead weight.  Because of the bear can and the 10 days of consumables coming out of MTR, I am focusing more, this trip, on bringing a minimum of stuff.  I really appreciate all the experiences and advice folks on this list have offered.

      Mina


      To: johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com
      From: bobolonius@...
      Date: Fri, 27 May 2011 00:38:04 +0000
      Subject: RE: [John Muir Trail] Tevas as stream crossing footwear . . . NOT REQUIRED READING . . .

       
      Mina, 

      Trail runners? Are you also used to them . . . hiked in them and so on . . . just asking, as there seem to be a lot of people who have this idea that they are going to go as light as possible, in spite of not really knowing how they'll do in trail runners (or whatever gear bandwagon the jump on) . . . 

      it's almost like if you're going to take trail-runners, you might as well just take a pair of thongs and leave the sandals at home . . . I've never done the trail runner thing, but wearing them as I do on a daily basis, they seem cool and comfortable enough to not need sandals . . . but yeah, like I said, it's awfully nice to slip on the sandals and go. 

      When are you hitting the trail? 

      Bob

      http://www.summitpost.org/plans/view_activity.php?post_id=6480






      To: johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com
      From: minafall2004_7@...
      Date: Thu, 26 May 2011 14:27:12 +0000
      Subject: RE: [John Muir Trail] Tevas as stream crossing footwear . . . NOT REQUIRED READING . . .

       
      Robert,

      Thanks for the clarification.  My toes really like to be free.  I don't wear shoes at all around the house and yard, even on gravel out back.   Chacos around town and at work most of the time, and even for day hiking in the stony, spiny Texas Hill Country.  But realistically I guess it is wishful thinking, about sandals on a long mountain hike.  Trail runners it is.

      Thanks,

      Mina


      To: johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com
      From: bobolonius@...
      Date: Thu, 26 May 2011 01:51:02 +0000
      Subject: RE: [John Muir Trail] Tevas as stream crossing footwear . . . NOT REQUIRED READING . . .

       

      "Does this mean you can hike the JMT in current model Tevas or Chacos?" 


      Mina, 

      This means there's lots of miles you can cover in Teva's (or chaco's) if you are already good and sturdy enough to handle it, but ultimately, I wouldn't, at all, say that you do the entire trail in any of them. You could, but you'd no doubt beat yourself up pretty bad and be taking a few chances. 

      I always get the funny look or comment when spotted in them, feet dirty as hell . . . 

      I discovered that I could handle the miles in a pair of Teva, not because I was making some sort of claim or pushing my limits, but rather that I'd managed some good hot spots on my feet and decided to switch the boots out for the sandals. 

      I was a bit skeptical, but then realized just how great it feels after a few hours of hiking in boots, to slap on the sandals––it just really perks my legs up and gets me going. It's that last few miles in a day that become a lot easier. 

      I've also gotten a few hot spots from my sandals, due to poor choices––two years ago I rolled into the valley, got a permit to leave that very afternoon and thought I'd easily make it up to LYV in my sandals, except that I hadn't been wearing them at all, prior to that morning when I got in the AMTRAK. 

      Pearly white, tender toes and I was sweating and rubbing and before I knew it, got an open bruise on my left small toe, right where the sandal rubbed against it, during all that uphill. So then I put the boots on and all was good. 

      I think a little bit of sandal for the first few days is a good idea and after a while your feet seem to toughen up, get accustomed to the air and the dirt and then . . . you (or I, anyway) can hike in them all day. 

      Teva and Chaco's seem to be the sandal brand of choice out there––I have seen a lot of people hiking in them and yes, a few hiking the entire trail . . . but they were gnarly rasta dudes and probably had no boots anyway, maaaan. 

      There's plenty of trail that's relatively soft, flat and sort of easy on the feet (Ha! sort of flat and sort of easy) but there's a lot more of it that chews up boots and the lack of support that a sandal would provide is often needed, especially when it comes to the passes and certain long, rocky stretches, where an ankle roll would be a bummer. 

      That being the case though, I have found that I am far more diligent when I am in the sandals, whereas I have taken my best trail dives while galloping along in my boots. 

      The ultimate point here with the great footwear debate is that we are looking for a multi-use tool: something to cross streams in; something to relax in camp with and ultimately––something that should the need arise, we can count on to be able to get us out of the mountains if need be . . . Teva/Chaco's are durable and stiff underfoot––they're adjustable, should you have some reason, like a swollen ankle or whatever . . .  

      Is it dinner time already? 

      Bob

      http://www.summitpost.org/plans/view_activity.php?post_id=6480






      To: johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com
      From: minafall2004_7@...
      Date: Thu, 26 May 2011 01:00:31 +0000
      Subject: RE: [John Muir Trail] Tevas as stream crossing footwear . . . NOT REQUIRED READING . . .

       

      . . I pretty much did it in my Teva's . . . 

      BOB

      Does this mean you can hike the JMT in current model Tevas or Chacos?

      Mina





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