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Re: [John Muir Trail] clothes

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  • John Ladd
    I d go for the rain pants first because they are quad use - add considerable warmth, block wind, keep you dry, and can serve as a vapor barrier inside your
    Message 1 of 11 , Apr 2, 2011
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      I'd go for the rain pants first because they are quad use - add considerable warmth, block wind, keep you dry, and can serve as a vapor barrier inside your sleeping bag in a cold snap (vapor barriers add a lot of warmth, though they can make you feel a bit clammy)

      I like having a fairly think fleece layer available, but it's very individual.

      John Curran Ladd
      1616 Castro Street
      San Francisco, CA  94114-3707
      415-648-9279


      On Sat, Apr 2, 2011 at 7:17 AM, T <tvanr13@...> wrote:
       

      Hey- I'm leaning toward my trustworthy convertible rei hiking pants but can't decide if rain pants and/or under armor bottoms would be worth the extra weight.
      Also, for top layers so far I have under armor long sleeve, rei long sleeve hiking uv shirt, REI Hood River fleece hoodie and a Marmot lightweight rain coat. I don't have much faith in the hoodie if it gets really cold (it's kind of thin) but maybe all 4 things combined would keep me warm? Or should I upgrade to a thicker fleece?
      Thanks, Tim


    • John
      Tim As John said, it s all very individual. Summer in the Sierra (or anywhere else for that matter) I don t care to hike in long pants. If it s a favorable
      Message 2 of 11 , Apr 2, 2011
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        Tim

        As John said, it's all very individual. Summer in the Sierra (or anywhere else for that matter) I don't care to hike in long pants. If it's a favorable forecast I usually don't bring rain pants at all.

        On longer trips I walk in very light shorts and carry light rain pants mostly for bugs around camp. If the weather really goes south as in well below freezing in August), I combine the light wind/rain pants with my sleeping "longjohns" (thin smart wool). In all but the heaviest of long, cold rains I just let my legs get wet (they dry pretty fast).

        JD
        Walk the Sky: Following the John Muir Trail (the book)
        www.johndittli.com



        --- In johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com, "T" <tvanr13@...> wrote:
        >
        > Hey- I'm leaning toward my trustworthy convertible rei hiking pants but can't decide if rain pants and/or under armor bottoms would be worth the extra weight.
        > Also, for top layers so far I have under armor long sleeve, rei long sleeve hiking uv shirt, REI Hood River fleece hoodie and a Marmot lightweight rain coat. I don't have much faith in the hoodie if it gets really cold (it's kind of thin) but maybe all 4 things combined would keep me warm? Or should I upgrade to a thicker fleece?
        > Thanks, Tim
        >
      • Viraj Ward
        Ditto, John on the rain pants. I can t really think of a reason not to bring them (isn t rain protection a ten essential?), and I use them every
        Message 3 of 11 , Apr 2, 2011
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          Ditto, John on the rain pants. I can't really think of a reason not to bring them (isn't rain protection a ten essential?), and I use them every evening on Sierra backpacks for the added warmth. I'm sure you will be happy to have them. I invested in a down sweater for my top layer system besides a SmartWool top. It's an option if you want more warmth instead of the added bulk of fleece. You might be surprised with how cold the nights/early mornings can be.
          Viraj
        • Roleigh Martin
          I take a contrary position. I find the need for rain pants in the last 11 years to be needed for about 3-4 hours total in 11 years. Since they are rarely
          Message 4 of 11 , Apr 2, 2011
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            I take a contrary position.  I find the need for rain pants in the last 11 years to be needed for about 3-4 hours total in 11 years.  Since they are rarely needed, I hike instead with a 1.4 oz cuben fiber kilt and it truly is multi-use:

            http://www.zpacks.com/accessories/cloudkilt.shtml

            1.  used as a Scottish rain Kilt when needed and you don't have to worry about taking off boots, etc., to get them on.  Quickly put on, quickly put off.

            2.  useful for doing a modesty wrap -- if you want to use the powerful cleansing force of water alone to wash, which is a great cleanser -- water is powerful enough to have made the grand canyon, you can bathe in the water and rub yourself clean with water, with this wrapped around you to be modest in mixed company.  The ladies in our group the last two years all had the kilt.  The competitor brand is the ULA rain wrap.  http://www.ula-equipment.com/rainwrap.asp

            3.  useful as a picnic/ground cloth when you take off your boots/socks and air them out during breaks, to get your boots/socks back on, it's nice to stand on the kilt as a picnic cloth to keep your socks clean.

            4.  useful as a seat cloth to protect your fanny from getting wet on a wet lock or wet rock.

            I think that the heavy duty cuben fiber will work better than the silnylon.  Silnylon when wet, seems to eventually get wet, where the cuben fiber is more impermeable (although as some testing at BPL shows, depends on the fabric thickness and intensity of the water pressure).

            If I was hiking anytime other than July/August in the Sierras, I'd probably bring true rain paints though.
          • clairehiker
            I layer just like Viraj suggests, and also use the down sweater or vest for a pillow.
            Message 5 of 11 , Apr 2, 2011
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              I layer just like Viraj suggests, and also use the down sweater or vest for a pillow.


              --- In johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com, Viraj Ward <birdnlady@...> wrote:
              >
              > Ditto, John on the rain pants. I can't really think of a reason not to bring
              > them (isn't rain protection a ten essential?), and I use them every
              > evening on Sierra backpacks for the added warmth. I'm sure you will be happy to
              > have them. I invested in a down sweater for my top layer system besides a
              > SmartWool top. It's an option if you want more warmth instead of the added bulk
              > of fleece. You might be surprised with how cold the nights/early mornings can
              > be.
              > Viraj
              >
            • targetdoggmechanic
              I have rarely needed the rain pains in June-July-August so I stopped bringing them. The storms never last that long. Usually by the time I used to be able to
              Message 6 of 11 , Apr 2, 2011
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                I have rarely needed the rain pains in June-July-August so I stopped bringing them. The storms never last that long. Usually by the time I used to be able to get them on, it stops or slows down. I wear Columbia or REI convertible pants or gym shorts and they dry quickly. If it's a heavy rain I sit it out either in a tent or drape my tent fly over me as a jacket. I do bring a rain jacket, but I usually use this as a windbreaker if there is a cold wind, like on top of Whitney, or if I am setting up a camp in the rain and the tent fly is in use. But everyone may have their own preferences. I tend to skimp on the clothing a bit and have never been disappointed.

                --- In johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com, "clairehiker" <clairehiker@...> wrote:
                >
                >
                >
                > I layer just like Viraj suggests, and also use the down sweater or vest for a pillow.
                >
                >
                > --- In johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com, Viraj Ward <birdnlady@> wrote:
                > >
                > > Ditto, John on the rain pants. I can't really think of a reason not to bring
                > > them (isn't rain protection a ten essential?), and I use them every
                > > evening on Sierra backpacks for the added warmth. I'm sure you will be happy to
                > > have them. I invested in a down sweater for my top layer system besides a
                > > SmartWool top. It's an option if you want more warmth instead of the added bulk
                > > of fleece. You might be surprised with how cold the nights/early mornings can
                > > be.
                > > Viraj
                > >
                >
              • robert shattuck
                Tim, I bought a pair of zip-pants, but like a few others here, I am all about just wearing the shorts. I ve always brought along the pants section, but not
                Message 7 of 11 , Apr 2, 2011
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                  Tim, 

                  I bought a pair of zip-pants, but like a few others here, I am all about just wearing the shorts. I've always brought along the "pants" section, but not once did I ever zip them on . . . not for the occasional chill or the bugs (not many in late august) and this last year I finally shredded the shorts a day or so before whitney and once in LP the whole thing made its way to the Lone Pine Land-fill. 

                  Some of us can find ten different legitimate uses for rain pants, but for actual rain, they really aren't needed. Wet legs, again, don't take too long to dry out. The few times I've freaked out and said, to myself––as I scrambled to take off my boots and put on the pants––gosh, I'm glad I brought these––by the time I had them on and they began to create that lovely, walking sauna, effect . . . I didn't need them anymore. 

                  You might also consider leaving the REI HOOD RIVER FLEECE at home for runs to the coffee shop. While it would no doubt do a good job, on top of your other three layers, you'd no doubt be warmer and much lighter by investing in a super-light down jacket, like a patogonia nano-puff hoody, or a Montbell U.L. down inner parka/hoody. 

                  Both of these are very warm, light and very compressible, unlike the REI fleece. 

                  my weight splurge is a patagonia R1 hoody––this over a poly t-shirt and the montbell hoody . . . plenty of warmth without hogging half your pack. 


                  BOB

                  http://www.summitpost.org/plans/view_activity.php?post_id=6480






                  To: johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com
                  From: tvanr13@...
                  Date: Sat, 2 Apr 2011 14:17:42 +0000
                  Subject: [John Muir Trail] clothes

                   
                  Hey- I'm leaning toward my trustworthy convertible rei hiking pants but can't decide if rain pants and/or under armor bottoms would be worth the extra weight.
                  Also, for top layers so far I have under armor long sleeve, rei long sleeve hiking uv shirt, REI Hood River fleece hoodie and a Marmot lightweight rain coat. I don't have much faith in the hoodie if it gets really cold (it's kind of thin) but maybe all 4 things combined would keep me warm? Or should I upgrade to a thicker fleece?
                  Thanks, Tim


                • gordonjacobsen
                  Another fan of shorts here. I do use converible pants in case I ever want to cover may knees and calves (usually because of skeeters). My rain shell generally
                  Message 8 of 11 , Apr 2, 2011
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                    Another fan of shorts here. I do use converible pants in case I ever want to cover may knees and calves (usually because of skeeters). My rain shell generally keeps me dry to my thighs and as others have mentioned, legs dry quickly. My warddrobe is:

                    TOP
                    - Wool T-Shirt (hiking shirt)
                    - Capilene Top (skeeters / pajamas)
                    - Puffy Sweater, mine is Primaloft (warmth and pillow)
                    - Shell (rain / wind)

                    BOTTOM
                    - Convertible Pants (hiking shorts)
                    - Capilene Bottom (warmth and pajamas)
                    - Wool Boxers







                    --- In johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com, "T" <tvanr13@...> wrote:
                    >
                    > Hey- I'm leaning toward my trustworthy convertible rei hiking pants but can't decide if rain pants and/or under armor bottoms would be worth the extra weight.
                    > Also, for top layers so far I have under armor long sleeve, rei long sleeve hiking uv shirt, REI Hood River fleece hoodie and a Marmot lightweight rain coat. I don't have much faith in the hoodie if it gets really cold (it's kind of thin) but maybe all 4 things combined would keep me warm? Or should I upgrade to a thicker fleece?
                    > Thanks, Tim
                    >
                  • John Ladd
                    One idea that hasn t been mentioned yet, may work for you at least for early or late season hiking. Go to your local Goodwill store in the mens suits or dress
                    Message 9 of 11 , Apr 2, 2011
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                      One idea that hasn't been mentioned yet, may work for you at least for
                      early or late season hiking. Go to your local Goodwill store in the
                      mens suits or dress pants section. Get a pair of fully lined wool
                      dress pants for about $5. Summer weight, light colored. Re-hem them so
                      they are short and don't have a cuff. Suspender buttons are a plus
                      -see Filson for really good suspenders. Pleated ones are particularly
                      comfortable. DWR treat for water repellency. The lining makes them
                      extremely comfortable to hike in. Wool stays warm when wet.

                      I assume that there are similar ones for women, though maybe not as
                      loose in the knee as is best for uphill comfort.

                      On Saturday, April 2, 2011, gordonjacobsen <gordonjacobsen@...> wrote:
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                      > Another fan of shorts here. I do use converible pants in case I ever want to cover may knees and calves (usually because of skeeters). My rain shell generally keeps me dry to my thighs and as others have mentioned, legs dry quickly. My warddrobe is:
                      >
                      > TOP
                      > - Wool T-Shirt (hiking shirt)
                      > - Capilene Top (skeeters / pajamas)
                      > - Puffy Sweater, mine is Primaloft (warmth and pillow)
                      > - Shell (rain / wind)
                      >
                      > BOTTOM
                      > - Convertible Pants (hiking shorts)
                      > - Capilene Bottom (warmth and pajamas)
                      > - Wool Boxers
                      >
                      > --- In johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com, "T" <tvanr13@...> wrote:
                      >>
                      >> Hey- I'm leaning toward my trustworthy convertible rei hiking pants but can't decide if rain pants and/or under armor bottoms would be worth the extra weight.
                      >> Also, for top layers so far I have under armor long sleeve, rei long sleeve hiking uv shirt, REI Hood River fleece hoodie and a Marmot lightweight rain coat. I don't have much faith in the hoodie if it gets really cold (it's kind of thin) but maybe all 4 things combined would keep me warm? Or should I upgrade to a thicker fleece?
                      >> Thanks, Tim
                      >>
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                      --
                      John Curran Ladd
                      1616 Castro Street
                      San Francisco, CA 94114-3707
                      415-648-9279
                    • will cef
                      Roleigh This is a great idea! For now, every item in my pack is being reviewed in an effort to diminish weigh, and I was also struggling as to the need to
                      Message 10 of 11 , Apr 3, 2011
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                        Roleigh
                           This is a great idea!  For now, every item in my pack is being reviewed in an effort to diminish weigh, and I was also struggling as to the need to bring rain pants. I had never even considered this option, but love the multiple uses...THANKS

                        Will



                        To: johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com
                        From: roleigh@...
                        Date: Sat, 2 Apr 2011 12:49:03 -0400
                        Subject: Re: [John Muir Trail] clothes

                         
                        I take a contrary position.  I find the need for rain pants in the last 11 years to be needed for about 3-4 hours total in 11 years.  Since they are rarely needed, I hike instead with a 1.4 oz cuben fiber kilt and it truly is multi-use:

                        http://www.zpacks.com/accessories/cloudkilt.shtml

                        1.  used as a Scottish rain Kilt when needed and you don't have to worry about taking off boots, etc., to get them on.  Quickly put on, quickly put off.

                        2.  useful for doing a modesty wrap -- if you want to use the powerful cleansing force of water alone to wash, which is a great cleanser -- water is powerful enough to have made the grand canyon, you can bathe in the water and rub yourself clean with water, with this wrapped around you to be modest in mixed company.  The ladies in our group the last two years all had the kilt.  The competitor brand is the ULA rain wrap.  http://www.ula-equipment.com/rainwrap.asp

                        3.  useful as a picnic/ground cloth when you take off your boots/socks and air them out during breaks, to get your boots/socks back on, it's nice to stand on the kilt as a picnic cloth to keep your socks clean.

                        4.  useful as a seat cloth to protect your fanny from getting wet on a wet lock or wet rock.

                        I think that the heavy duty cuben fiber will work better than the silnylon.  Silnylon when wet, seems to eventually get wet, where the cuben fiber is more impermeable (although as some testing at BPL shows, depends on the fabric thickness and intensity of the water pressure).

                        If I was hiking anytime other than July/August in the Sierras, I'd probably bring true rain paints though.

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