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Re: [John Muir Trail] New research on altitude sickness, risk profile, and prevention

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  • Viraj Ward
    Thanks, John. Great links. Viraj ________________________________ From: John Ladd To: johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com Sent: Sat, March 26,
    Message 1 of 3 , Mar 26, 2011
      Thanks, John.
      Great links.
      Viraj


      From: John Ladd <johnladd@...>
      To: johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com
      Sent: Sat, March 26, 2011 2:52:20 PM
      Subject: Re: [John Muir Trail] New research on altitude sickness, risk profile, and prevention

       

      Before getting too worried about this, note that these are rates if you go from sea level immediately to the elevations stated with no gradual acclimation at all. 

      Title of the chart is:

      "Projections for proportion of unacclimatized troops who will get sick at high altitudes"

      The Army needs to know about this because soldiers can be airlifted or parachuted from sea level on one night to altitude on the next day/night without any time at intermediate altitudes.  Backpackers who follow standard recommendations -- start at 8,000 feet or lower and sleep no higher than 1,200 feet higher on each of the successive nights -- would presumably have way lower incidence rates than these.

      For more detail on Army findings and recommendations, see this report

      Altitude Acclimatization and Illness Management Guidelines

      http://www.usariem.army.mil/pages/download/TB%20Med%20505%20Sept%202010.pdf

      An anti-inflammatory like Ibuprofen can help minimize the chance of developing altitude problems.  Discussed in our prior thread:

      http://groups.yahoo.com/group/johnmuirtrail/message/10781


      John Curran Ladd
      1616 Castro Street
      San Francisco, CA  94114-3707
      415-648-9279


      On Fri, Mar 25, 2011 at 10:56 AM, Judith <judithsmcguire@...> wrote:
       

      Perhaps of interest to JMT readers is research DOD is doing on high altitude.

      http://online.wsj.com/article_email/SB10001424052748703362904576218683033688352-lMyQjAxMTAxMDIwNTEyNDUyWj.html

      I was interested to see the following table of susceptibility to altitude sickness:

      Mountain Malaise

      Projections for proportion of unacclimatized troops who will get sick at high altitudes.

      10,000 feet â€" 25-35%

      11,500 feet â€" 50-60%

      13,200 feet â€" 80-90%

      14,800 feet â€" 90-100%

      Source: Stephen Muza, U.S. Army Research Institute of Environmental Medicine

      Judy McGuire


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