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What to do about those of us needing correction...vision, that is!

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  • PressEsc
    I ve been pondering this questions and going back and forth about what to do and my husband...gotta love him...suggested I post something to the list...so here
    Message 1 of 17 , Mar 22, 2011
      I've been pondering this questions and going back and forth about what to do and my husband...gotta love him...suggested I post something to the list...so here goes.

      I require eye glasses or some form of vision correction at all times - unless walking off cliffs and into trees is part of the desired experience - and am vacillating between getting daily wear contacts that I can just chuck into the rubbish sack each day and not worry about cleaning solution, etc., or just bringing my glasses.

      I'll be needing sunglasses on the trail regardless. So if I don't bring contacts, I'll need to get/bring prescription sunglasses along with regular ones.

      Have any of you dealt with this problem? How did you handle it?

      Geesh, John Muir didn't have to care about ANY of this stuff, did he?
    • eaglepdub
      For this guy that a no brainer.... Go with the contacts. For me my glasses collect trail dust all day, meaning I am forever wiping them and cleaning them.
      Message 2 of 17 , Mar 22, 2011
        For this guy that a no brainer.... Go with the contacts. For me my glasses collect trail dust all day, meaning I am forever wiping them and cleaning them. You end up getting bug spray, sunscreen, rain, sweat etc. all over your glasses all day. Go with the contacts!

        --- In johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com, "PressEsc" <christimcginley@...> wrote:
        >
        > I've been pondering this questions and going back and forth about what to do and my husband...gotta love him...suggested I post something to the list...so here goes.
        >
        > I require eye glasses or some form of vision correction at all times - unless walking off cliffs and into trees is part of the desired experience - and am vacillating between getting daily wear contacts that I can just chuck into the rubbish sack each day and not worry about cleaning solution, etc., or just bringing my glasses.
        >
        > I'll be needing sunglasses on the trail regardless. So if I don't bring contacts, I'll need to get/bring prescription sunglasses along with regular ones.
        >
        > Have any of you dealt with this problem? How did you handle it?
        >
        > Geesh, John Muir didn't have to care about ANY of this stuff, did he?
        >
      • Ed Rodriguez
        The way I deal with this is I had clip on for my glasses which really work out nice for me. I carried these whip to clean them off each day but hardly use
        Message 3 of 17 , Mar 22, 2011
          The way I deal with this is I had clip on for my glasses which really work out nice for me. I carried these whip to clean them off each day but hardly use them. Yea I had to deal with cleaning both my glasses and my clip on. Am just wondering with the people that do wear contact in the back country how it was wearing contact. (am not a contact person)  


          From: eaglepdub <eaglepdub@...>
          To: johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com
          Sent: Tue, March 22, 2011 9:25:01 PM
          Subject: [John Muir Trail] Re: What to do about those of us needing correction...vision, that is!

           

          For this guy that a no brainer.... Go with the contacts. For me my glasses collect trail dust all day, meaning I am forever wiping them and cleaning them. You end up getting bug spray, sunscreen, rain, sweat etc. all over your glasses all day. Go with the contacts!

          --- In johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com, "PressEsc" <christimcginley@...> wrote:
          >
          > I've been pondering this questions and going back and forth about what to do and my husband...gotta love him...suggested I post something to the list...so here goes.
          >
          > I require eye glasses or some form of vision correction at all times - unless walking off cliffs and into trees is part of the desired experience - and am vacillating between getting daily wear contacts that I can just chuck into the rubbish sack each day and not worry about cleaning solution, etc., or just bringing my glasses.
          >
          > I'll be needing sunglasses on the trail regardless. So if I don't bring contacts, I'll need to get/bring prescription sunglasses along with regular ones.
          >
          > Have any of you dealt with this problem? How did you handle it?
          >
          > Geesh, John Muir didn't have to care about ANY of this stuff, did he?
          >


        • lmc9999
          The trail definitely poses a challenge when it comes to dealing with vision correction. You don t want to miss an ounce of the majestic beauty out there!
          Message 4 of 17 , Mar 23, 2011
            The trail definitely poses a challenge when it comes to dealing with vision correction. You don't want to miss an ounce of the majestic beauty out there!

            Personally, my prescription is so high that vision and depth perception are lousy with glasses, so I had to develop a system to ensure contacts would work. I keep some disinfectant wipes with my toiletry kit to minimize risk of contaminating my lenses during handling. Wearing contacts also allows you more selection for really good sunglasses, a must for UV and glare protection. On the flip side, if you have dry eyes, you may have difficulty tolerating contacts out in the dry alpine environment.

            Daily contact lenses are an option, and you can also try extended wear contact lenses that you can leave in for up to 30 days. Your prescription will likely factor into what a doctor would choose for you. Daily contacts require you to carry more trash (blister packs), and the extended wear contacts increase your risk of infection or corneal ulcer. Fortunately, corneal ulcers are rare, but if you got one, it would end your hike very quickly and it could permanently alter your vision.

            I am an optometrist, so this topic is near and dear to my heart. :-) I only prescribe extended wear contact lenses in extreme circumstances, but that's my personal position. You will find others who are less conservative. Anyway, I'll save you from more rambling and recommend a visit with your eye care professional soon because that will give you time to try a few different things and work out the kinks in whatever you choose. If you explain your backpacking needs, he/she will have recommendations. Feel free to email me offline if you have specific questions. Hope this helps.

            Lisa



            --- In johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com, "PressEsc" <christimcginley@...> wrote:
            >
            > I've been pondering this questions and going back and forth about what to do and my husband...gotta love him...suggested I post something to the list...so here goes.
            >
            > I require eye glasses or some form of vision correction at all times - unless walking off cliffs and into trees is part of the desired experience - and am vacillating between getting daily wear contacts that I can just chuck into the rubbish sack each day and not worry about cleaning solution, etc., or just bringing my glasses.
            >
            > I'll be needing sunglasses on the trail regardless. So if I don't bring contacts, I'll need to get/bring prescription sunglasses along with regular ones.
            >
            > Have any of you dealt with this problem? How did you handle it?
            >
            > Geesh, John Muir didn't have to care about ANY of this stuff, did he?
            >
          • Peter Burke
            I ve hiked with extended wear contacts (no change all hike long), but in general started to dislike wearing contacts, mostly at work staring at computers all
            Message 5 of 17 , Mar 23, 2011
              I've hiked with extended wear contacts (no change all hike long), but in
              general started to dislike wearing contacts, mostly at work staring at
              computers all day my eyes just get too dry. I also am not so happy with
              the the less than perfect vision correction they provide. I now use
              glasses and custom sunglasses. Haven't had a problem with that setup
              over 4 JMTs. Nothing wrong with contacts on the JMT, though. I do carry
              a pair with me as backup, but so far never needed to open the package.
            • targetdoggmechanic
              WOW! We have such a well-rounded group! We have business professionals, lawyers, doctors, optometrists, teachers...outstanding! This group is such a great
              Message 6 of 17 , Mar 23, 2011
                WOW! We have such a well-rounded group! We have business professionals, lawyers, doctors, optometrists, teachers...outstanding! This group is such a great resource!

                > I am an optometrist, so this topic is near and dear to my heart. :-) I only prescribe extended wear contact lenses in extreme circumstances, but that's my personal position. You will find others who are less conservative. Anyway, I'll save you from more rambling and recommend a visit with your eye care professional soon because that will give you time to try a few different things and work out the kinks in whatever you choose. If you explain your backpacking needs, he/she will have recommendations. Feel free to email me offline if you have specific questions. Hope this helps.
                >
                > Lisa
              • Christi gmail
                Wow, thanks to everyone who s chimed in. It s given me food for thought. My eye doctor suggested extended wear (3 day not 30 day) but I do have dry eyes so
                Message 7 of 17 , Mar 23, 2011
                  Wow, thanks to everyone who's chimed in.    It's given me food for thought.  My eye doctor suggested extended wear (3 day not 30 day) but I do have dry eyes so I think I'd prefer something I can take out at the end of the day and also not have to drag along cleaning solution. 

                  It was my intent to just bring my regular glasses and then also a good pair of prescription sunglasses but they told me my correction would not accommodate the wrap around sunglasses that I use with my contacts which I wanted to make into prescription glasses. 

                  So I'm stuck with getting a pair of prescription sunglasses that don't fully cover or going with a daily wear lens that I can use my good sunglasses with.

                  Thank you for sharing a little bit of your professional knowledge!

                  I have an appointment with my Eye Doc soon.  I definitely want time to adjust to lenses if that's the direction I go. 

                  Thanks again everyone!
                  Christi



                  On 3/23/11 9:51 AM, lmc9999 wrote:
                   

                  The trail definitely poses a challenge when it comes to dealing with vision correction. You don't want to miss an ounce of the majestic beauty out there!

                  Personally, my prescription is so high that vision and depth perception are lousy with glasses, so I had to develop a system to ensure contacts would work. I keep some disinfectant wipes with my toiletry kit to minimize risk of contaminating my lenses during handling. Wearing contacts also allows you more selection for really good sunglasses, a must for UV and glare protection. On the flip side, if you have dry eyes, you may have difficulty tolerating contacts out in the dry alpine environment.

                  Daily contact lenses are an option, and you can also try extended wear contact lenses that you can leave in for up to 30 days. Your prescription will likely factor into what a doctor would choose for you. Daily contacts require you to carry more trash (blister packs), and the extended wear contacts increase your risk of infection or corneal ulcer. Fortunately, corneal ulcers are rare, but if you got one, it would end your hike very quickly and it could permanently alter your vision.

                  I am an optometrist, so this topic is near and dear to my heart. :-) I only prescribe extended wear contact lenses in extreme circumstances, but that's my personal position. You will find others who are less conservative. Anyway, I'll save you from more rambling and recommend a visit with your eye care professional soon because that will give you time to try a few different things and work out the kinks in whatever you choose. If you explain your backpacking needs, he/she will have recommendations. Feel free to email me offline if you have specific questions. Hope this helps.

                  Lisa

                  --- In johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com, "PressEsc" <christimcginley@...> wrote:
                  >
                  > I've been pondering this questions and going back and forth about what to do and my husband...gotta love him...suggested I post something to the list...so here goes.
                  >
                  > I require eye glasses or some form of vision correction at all times - unless walking off cliffs and into trees is part of the desired experience - and am vacillating between getting daily wear contacts that I can just chuck into the rubbish sack each day and not worry about cleaning solution, etc., or just bringing my glasses.
                  >
                  > I'll be needing sunglasses on the trail regardless. So if I don't bring contacts, I'll need to get/bring prescription sunglasses along with regular ones.
                  >
                  > Have any of you dealt with this problem? How did you handle it?
                  >
                  > Geesh, John Muir didn't have to care about ANY of this stuff, did he?
                  >


                • Peter Burke
                  ... shop around - most places will tell you that because the chance to screw up a lens in those framer increases with higher prescriptions. I had -8 diopter
                  Message 8 of 17 , Mar 23, 2011
                    On 3/23/2011 6:26 PM, Christi gmail wrote:


                    It was my intent to just bring my regular glasses and then also a good pair of prescription sunglasses but they told me my correction would not accommodate the wrap around sunglasses that I use with my contacts which I wanted to make into prescription glasses. 

                    shop around - most places will tell you that because the chance to screw up a lens in those framer increases with higher prescriptions.  I had -8 diopter lenses made for a frame the very same place now won't touch again to update. Almost depends on who you talk to.


                    So I'm stuck with getting a pair of prescription sunglasses that don't fully cover or going with a daily wear lens that I can use my good sunglasses with.

                    you could get some classic glasses with leather side covers like glacier glasses. Totally flat lenses. Wrap around is an overrated feature - total distortion on the edges of my wraparound sunglasses

                  • Christi gmail
                    Yep, I figured I could push the point about the lens curve elsewhere and may still do that. I don t have a total wrap around lens now but they do curve some
                    Message 9 of 17 , Mar 23, 2011
                      Yep, I figured I could push the point about the lens curve elsewhere and may still do that. 

                      I don't have a total wrap around lens now but they do curve some which give a little extra visible area without having to turn the head so much.  I don't get any distortion from them that I can tell.

                      Either way, it sucks to be "nearly blind" (ok that's a little bit of an overstatement) and want to get away from all the trappings of modern life for a little while.

                      When was it that we "all" started wearing corrective eyewear?  I don't know anyone who doesn't have some sort of corrective something for their eyes.  Surely back in John Muir's day the need for glasses wasn't like it is today.  Maybe Lisa or others can enlighten us on when that change occurred in our history?

                      Meanwhile...where did I leave my glasses?  Ouch!  Found them. 8-/

                      Christi

                      On 3/23/11 4:38 PM, Peter Burke wrote:
                       

                      On 3/23/2011 6:26 PM, Christi gmail wrote:



                      It was my intent to just bring my regular glasses and then also a good pair of prescription sunglasses but they told me my correction would not accommodate the wrap around sunglasses that I use with my contacts which I wanted to make into prescription glasses. 

                      shop around - most places will tell you that because the chance to screw up a lens in those framer increases with higher prescriptions.  I had -8 diopter lenses made for a frame the very same place now won't touch again to update. Almost depends on who you talk to.


                      So I'm stuck with getting a pair of prescription sunglasses that don't fully cover or going with a daily wear lens that I can use my good sunglasses with.

                      you could get some classic glasses with leather side covers like glacier glasses. Totally flat lenses. Wrap around is an overrated feature - total distortion on the edges of my wraparound sunglasses


                    • brink_nathan
                      Glasses got a lot cheaper to make is what happened. Anyhow, I love my contacts for a lot of things, going to the gym, shooting, flying, etc. but it s not worth
                      Message 10 of 17 , Mar 23, 2011
                        Glasses got a lot cheaper to make is what happened.

                        Anyhow, I love my contacts for a lot of things, going to the gym, shooting, flying, etc. but it's not worth the hassle to me on the trail, I just stick to glasses with clip on sunshades. Something about my eyes can't handle the extended wear contacts I've tried past about one night, otherwise that'd be great.

                        --- In johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com, Christi gmail <christimcginley@...> wrote:
                        >

                        > When was it that we "all" started wearing corrective eyewear? I don't
                        > know anyone who doesn't have some sort of corrective something for their
                        > eyes. Surely back in John Muir's day the need for glasses wasn't like
                        > it is today. Maybe Lisa or others can enlighten us on when that change
                        > occurred in our history?

                        >
                      • mickyeadams@rocketmail.com
                        Thanks, all. I ve been working on this topic, myself. I can t get good correction with glasses. I ve had 2 corneal ulcers in the past 15 years and fear
                        Message 11 of 17 , Mar 24, 2011
                          Thanks, all. I've been working on this topic, myself. I can't get good correction with glasses. I've had 2 corneal ulcers in the past 15 years and fear them. But I like to see the stars after I take out my contacts. I'm taking contacts and resupplying with solution and spare lenses. I'm also taking glasses for night. (And I am keeping my baseweight under 18 pounds.) Finally, I used to race bicycles so I worked hard to get good prescription sunglasses after my last ulcer. I could not get any strong enough in sports glass shape. The wrap was critical for wind protection on those quick descents and over hundreds of miles. I found wraps made a huge difference.

                          If anyone has taken contact soln, how much? How do you keep your hands clean for handling?

                          --- In johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com, "brink_nathan" <brink_nathan@...> wrote:
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          > Glasses got a lot cheaper to make is what happened.
                          >
                          > Anyhow, I love my contacts for a lot of things, going to the gym, shooting, flying, etc. but it's not worth the hassle to me on the trail, I just stick to glasses with clip on sunshades. Something about my eyes can't handle the extended wear contacts I've tried past about one night, otherwise that'd be great.
                          >
                          > --- In johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com, Christi gmail <christimcginley@> wrote:
                          > >
                          >
                          > > When was it that we "all" started wearing corrective eyewear? I don't
                          > > know anyone who doesn't have some sort of corrective something for their
                          > > eyes. Surely back in John Muir's day the need for glasses wasn't like
                          > > it is today. Maybe Lisa or others can enlighten us on when that change
                          > > occurred in our history?
                          >
                          > >
                          >
                        • angelaleeak
                          My eyes are not too sensitive, and I get by fine wearing contacts every day with glasses as backup. I have found it saves space and weight to use a 1oz plastic
                          Message 12 of 17 , Mar 24, 2011
                            My eyes are not too sensitive, and I get by fine wearing contacts every day with glasses as backup. I have found it saves space and weight to use a 1oz plastic container with squeeze top and fill it with contact solution (purchased at REI). That usually lasts me at least 8 days before refilling it. It might not be the most sanitary but it works for me :-)

                            --- In johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com, Christi gmail <christimcginley@...> wrote:
                            >
                            > Wow, thanks to everyone who's chimed in. It's given me food for
                            > thought. My eye doctor suggested extended wear (3 day not 30 day) but I
                            > do have dry eyes so I think I'd prefer something I can take out at the
                            > end of the day and also not have to drag along cleaning solution.
                            >
                            > It was my intent to just bring my regular glasses and then also a good
                            > pair of prescription sunglasses but they told me my correction would not
                            > accommodate the wrap around sunglasses that I use with my contacts which
                            > I wanted to make into prescription glasses.
                            >
                            > So I'm stuck with getting a pair of prescription sunglasses that don't
                            > fully cover or going with a daily wear lens that I can use my good
                            > sunglasses with.
                            >
                            > Thank you for sharing a little bit of your professional knowledge!
                            >
                            > I have an appointment with my Eye Doc soon. I definitely want time to
                            > adjust to lenses if that's the direction I go.
                            >
                            > Thanks again everyone!
                            > Christi
                            >
                            >
                            >
                            > On 3/23/11 9:51 AM, lmc9999 wrote:
                            > >
                            > > The trail definitely poses a challenge when it comes to dealing with
                            > > vision correction. You don't want to miss an ounce of the majestic
                            > > beauty out there!
                            > >
                            > > Personally, my prescription is so high that vision and depth
                            > > perception are lousy with glasses, so I had to develop a system to
                            > > ensure contacts would work. I keep some disinfectant wipes with my
                            > > toiletry kit to minimize risk of contaminating my lenses during
                            > > handling. Wearing contacts also allows you more selection for really
                            > > good sunglasses, a must for UV and glare protection. On the flip side,
                            > > if you have dry eyes, you may have difficulty tolerating contacts out
                            > > in the dry alpine environment.
                            > >
                            > > Daily contact lenses are an option, and you can also try extended wear
                            > > contact lenses that you can leave in for up to 30 days. Your
                            > > prescription will likely factor into what a doctor would choose for
                            > > you. Daily contacts require you to carry more trash (blister packs),
                            > > and the extended wear contacts increase your risk of infection or
                            > > corneal ulcer. Fortunately, corneal ulcers are rare, but if you got
                            > > one, it would end your hike very quickly and it could permanently
                            > > alter your vision.
                            > >
                            > > I am an optometrist, so this topic is near and dear to my heart. :-) I
                            > > only prescribe extended wear contact lenses in extreme circumstances,
                            > > but that's my personal position. You will find others who are less
                            > > conservative. Anyway, I'll save you from more rambling and recommend a
                            > > visit with your eye care professional soon because that will give you
                            > > time to try a few different things and work out the kinks in whatever
                            > > you choose. If you explain your backpacking needs, he/she will have
                            > > recommendations. Feel free to email me offline if you have specific
                            > > questions. Hope this helps.
                            > >
                            > > Lisa
                            > >
                            > > --- In johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com
                            > > <mailto:johnmuirtrail%40yahoogroups.com>, "PressEsc"
                            > > <christimcginley@> wrote:
                            > > >
                            > > > I've been pondering this questions and going back and forth about
                            > > what to do and my husband...gotta love him...suggested I post
                            > > something to the list...so here goes.
                            > > >
                            > > > I require eye glasses or some form of vision correction at all times
                            > > - unless walking off cliffs and into trees is part of the desired
                            > > experience - and am vacillating between getting daily wear contacts
                            > > that I can just chuck into the rubbish sack each day and not worry
                            > > about cleaning solution, etc., or just bringing my glasses.
                            > > >
                            > > > I'll be needing sunglasses on the trail regardless. So if I don't
                            > > bring contacts, I'll need to get/bring prescription sunglasses along
                            > > with regular ones.
                            > > >
                            > > > Have any of you dealt with this problem? How did you handle it?
                            > > >
                            > > > Geesh, John Muir didn't have to care about ANY of this stuff, did he?
                            > > >
                            > >
                            > >
                            >
                          • karenamoore1982
                            I hiked the Appalachian Trail a couple years ago and struggled with this months before I left on my trip. I had always worn monthly contacts during the day
                            Message 13 of 17 , Mar 24, 2011
                              I hiked the Appalachian Trail a couple years ago and struggled with this months before I left on my trip. I had always worn monthly contacts during the day and glasses at night, but on the trail I didn't want to have to deal with rinsing my contacts each night with dirty hands and having to pack contact solution and a case (I have found that when traveling, sometimes the solution seeps out of the lense case if it's not on tight enough, resulting in dried out lenses).

                              Anyways, before my hiking trip I went to my eye doctor and tried on a few samples of daily lenses until I found ones that felt good and weren't too pricey. I'm so glad this is what I ended up doing for the AT, and I'll do again for my upcoming JMT hike this summer. On the AT, I sent myself contacts in the mail the entire way, but I think I'll just carry 3.5 weeks of contacts with me on the JMT from the start. They dont weigh much and I dont want to worry about not having contacts if for some reason my mail drop didn't arrive. It's nice being able to put in clean, fresh contacts each morning than struggling with putting in contacts that are floating in gritty solution that probably never really get that clean. I wore glasses each night, and sometimes even hiked in my glasses if I was too lazy to put my contacts in in the morning.

                              Good luck!

                              --- In johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com, "PressEsc" <christimcginley@...> wrote:
                              >
                              > I've been pondering this questions and going back and forth about what to do and my husband...gotta love him...suggested I post something to the list...so here goes.
                              >
                              > I require eye glasses or some form of vision correction at all times - unless walking off cliffs and into trees is part of the desired experience - and am vacillating between getting daily wear contacts that I can just chuck into the rubbish sack each day and not worry about cleaning solution, etc., or just bringing my glasses.
                              >
                              > I'll be needing sunglasses on the trail regardless. So if I don't bring contacts, I'll need to get/bring prescription sunglasses along with regular ones.
                              >
                              > Have any of you dealt with this problem? How did you handle it?
                              >
                              > Geesh, John Muir didn't have to care about ANY of this stuff, did he?
                              >
                            • lmc9999
                              Hi Christi, how high is your prescription? You might want to find out if there is an office near you that specializes in sports vision. They would be more
                              Message 14 of 17 , Mar 24, 2011
                                Hi Christi, how high is your prescription? You might want to find out if there is an office near you that specializes in sports vision. They would be more likely to have solutions to give you the best compromise between wrap and distortion from induced astigmatism.

                                > When was it that we "all" started wearing corrective eyewear? I
                                > don't know anyone who doesn't have some sort of corrective
                                > something for their eyes. Surely back in John Muir's day the need
                                > for glasses wasn't like it is today. Maybe Lisa or others can
                                > enlighten us on when that change
                                > occurred in our history?

                                You may be sorry you asked because I really "geek out" on this kind of stuff. :-) However, it depends on the reason for needing glasses:
                                1. UV protection: John Muir probably developed more cataract than we do because he didn't have UV protection beyond his hat.
                                2. Reading difficulty: He almost certainly would have needed them by the time he was in his early 40's because the condition known as presbyopia has been around as long we know. (Ben Franklin is widely credited with inventing the bifocal lens in the 18th century. As we our society has evolved from doing mostly farming/manual types of work to office/computer work, the need for help with reading has become more pronounced, but the need has always been there.) The one exception would have been if John Muir's distance prescription was in the -1.00 to -3.00 range because then he would have dealt with distance blur his whole life, but able to read even beyond his 40's.
                                3. Distance blur: Statistically speaking, it's more likely that he was far-sighted, although who knows if that's been documented somewhere.

                                That got me wondering, so after I wrote that last paragraph, I called the John Muir National Historic Site in Martinez, CA. The rangers and curators were very helpful and kind of amused by the question. The bottom line is the speculations were correct. (I'm paraphrasing here.) He was slightly far-sighted and didn't need glasses for distance. That makes sense given his vivid descriptions of the Range of Light. The curator told me that the family donated a pair of his reading glasses which now belong to the historic site.

                                They also reminded me of something that I learned when I did the tour a few years ago. Did you know that an eye injury triggered his decision to become a naturalist? (Paraphrasing again) He was working in Wisconsin when a metal file punctured his eye and damaged the optic nerve. While recovering from that injury, he decided to do his first long walk to Florida. He believed walking restored his vision, just as he believed swimming in a cold lake could cure a fever, etc. There's a video on this website which tells the story. Scroll down and select the video at the bottom of the list. It's called "A Glorious Journey." I couldn't play it for some reason even though I have silverlight installed...don't know why. Hopefully someone out there can enjoy it.
                                http://richmond.granicus.com/ViewPublisher.php?view_id=6

                                BTW - I highly recommend the tour in Martinez if you ever get the chance to do it. My husband and I really enjoyed it.
                                http://www.nps.gov/jomu/index.htm

                                Hope that answers the questions. Sorry if it was more than you wanted to know!

                                Lisa
                              • Christi
                                Hi Lisa, I LOVE that you took the time to called the JM Historic Site to find out more . I wonder if they ve ever been asked this question before? Thanks for
                                Message 15 of 17 , Mar 25, 2011
                                  Hi Lisa,

                                  I LOVE that you took the time to called the JM Historic Site to find out more .  I wonder if they've ever been asked this question before?  Thanks for sharing the information and taking the time to find out for all of us.  It seems there's more interest on this topic (at least among a few of us) than I'd originally expected.

                                  Here's my RX for eyes from last January 2010:

                                  Contact Lens RX:
                                  RT: -3.25 distance
                                  LT: -3.25 distance
                                  LT: -2.75 monovision

                                  Spectacle RX:
                                  RT: -3.25 Sph
                                  LT: -3.50 Sph
                                  Add: +1.50

                                  Here's the rest:  367.1 (-) Myopia
                                  367.20 (cyl) Astigmatism
                                  367.4 (add) Presbyopia

                                  I have no idea what ANY of that means but I bet you do!

                                  It's a good idea to check out a sports specific eye wear company.  Do you have any names to suggest?  I live near Seattle and could probably find something in that area but not sure what company would specialize in that service.

                                  I hope to "see" you on the trail some time!

                                  Christi

                                  On 3/24/11 3:52 PM, lmc9999 wrote:
                                   

                                  Hi Christi, how high is your prescription? You might want to find out if there is an office near you that specializes in sports vision. They would be more likely to have solutions to give you the best compromise between wrap and distortion from induced astigmatism.

                                  > When was it that we "all" started wearing corrective eyewear? I
                                  > don't know anyone who doesn't have some sort of corrective
                                  > something for their eyes. Surely back in John Muir's day the need
                                  > for glasses wasn't like it is today. Maybe Lisa or others can
                                  > enlighten us on when that change
                                  > occurred in our history?

                                  You may be sorry you asked because I really "geek out" on this kind of stuff. :-) However, it depends on the reason for needing glasses:
                                  1. UV protection: John Muir probably developed more cataract than we do because he didn't have UV protection beyond his hat.
                                  2. Reading difficulty: He almost certainly would have needed them by the time he was in his early 40's because the condition known as presbyopia has been around as long we know. (Ben Franklin is widely credited with inventing the bifocal lens in the 18th century. As we our society has evolved from doing mostly farming/manual types of work to office/computer work, the need for help with reading has become more pronounced, but the need has always been there.) The one exception would have been if John Muir's distance prescription was in the -1.00 to -3.00 range because then he would have dealt with distance blur his whole life, but able to read even beyond his 40's.
                                  3. Distance blur: Statistically speaking, it's more likely that he was far-sighted, although who knows if that's been documented somewhere.

                                  That got me wondering, so after I wrote that last paragraph, I called the John Muir National Historic Site in Martinez, CA. The rangers and curators were very helpful and kind of amused by the question. The bottom line is the speculations were correct. (I'm paraphrasing here.) He was slightly far-sighted and didn't need glasses for distance. That makes sense given his vivid descriptions of the Range of Light. The curator told me that the family donated a pair of his reading glasses which now belong to the historic site.

                                  They also reminded me of something that I learned when I did the tour a few years ago. Did you know that an eye injury triggered his decision to become a naturalist? (Paraphrasing again) He was working in Wisconsin when a metal file punctured his eye and damaged the optic nerve. While recovering from that injury, he decided to do his first long walk to Florida. He believed walking restored his vision, just as he believed swimming in a cold lake could cure a fever, etc. There's a video on this website which tells the story. Scroll down and select the video at the bottom of the list. It's called "A Glorious Journey." I couldn't play it for some reason even though I have silverlight installed...don't know why. Hopefully someone out there can enjoy it.
                                  http://richmond.granicus.com/ViewPublisher.php?view_id=6

                                  BTW - I highly recommend the tour in Martinez if you ever get the chance to do it. My husband and I really enjoyed it.
                                  http://www.nps.gov/jomu/index.htm

                                  Hope that answers the questions. Sorry if it was more than you wanted to know!

                                  Lisa



                                  -- 
                                  Christi
                                • judy
                                  Two more suggestions: (1) a large pill bottle provides a light weight, rigid, but not brittle, 1 oz carrying case--the cylindrical shape keeps the lens from
                                  Message 16 of 17 , Mar 26, 2011
                                    Two more suggestions: (1) a large pill bottle provides a light weight, rigid, but not brittle, 1 oz carrying case--the cylindrical shape keeps the lens from contacting any surfaces that might cause scratches. I posted this at (scroll to the bottom) --> http://www.backpackinglight.com/cgi-bin/backpackinglight/forums/thread_display.html?forum_thread_id=9537&startat=20&id=6UBcniK5:75.104.114.95 (2) So-called "Sun Readers" are available on the web in standard diopters (and as bifocals) that I have found very useful to correct the vision problems associated with aging (presbyopia) --> http://www.boomersintheknow.com/
                                  • lmc9999
                                    ... The volume of solution needed will vary depending on the solution and size of the lens well in your case. Next time you start a new bottle, track how long
                                    Message 17 of 17 , Mar 26, 2011
                                      > If anyone has taken contact soln, how much? How do you keep your hands clean for handling?

                                      The volume of solution needed will vary depending on the solution and size of the lens well in your case. Next time you start a new bottle, track how long it takes to consume it, then calculate the # of ounces needed per day.

                                      There are trial size bottles for all of the brand-name solutions out there. If you can't find them in the store, ask your optometrist for some. We're only supposed to give out one per year per patient, but if you explain your needs, they will probably give you a few more. It's better to do that than transfer from a large to small bottle and risk contamination.

                                      You also asked about how to keep your hands clean. I keep towelette wipes with my toiletry kit, but we all know that they only go so far. (And who knows what could be growing in the grime that develops under our fingernails!)

                                      Sorry to hear about the corneal ulcers. They are not fun!

                                      Lisa
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