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things get lost more than stolen . . .

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  • robert shattuck
    I ve never had a problem or caught scent of someone even thinking about nabbing my gear . . . but I ve managed to leave behind one water filter. I ve gotten in
    Message 1 of 4 , Mar 3, 2011
      I've never had a problem or caught scent of someone even thinking about nabbing my gear . . . but I've managed to leave behind one water filter. I've gotten in the habit when getting something out of the pack, of zipping it right back up, so nothing falls out should I throw the pack on. 

      I carry my "canister quarter" (someone drilled the quarter and I found it on the street ) on a length of cord, that makes it easier to retrieve in my pocket, especially if I am wearing gloves. 

      I've also got in the habit of knowing which pocket things go in and keeping it that way and most importantly, I start every morning by laying out my sleeping pad (since it's the last thing I strap onto the pack) and then emptying the tent contents onto it . . . bottles, glasses, socks, whatever things I've stashed in the tent pockets for the night . . . everything gets collected on the pad––the tent gets broken down, stuffed and so on until all you have is an empty pad.

      I should just spray paint shadows on the pad, like you might do at your work bench :) 

      I lost my water filter by hanging it in a tree one night, not any higher than I could reach, but then forgot it in the morning, probably because I was looking all over the ground, but not in the trees for my stuff. 

      I also use those lovely address labels that organizations send you in the hopes of getting money. I slap them on my poles, my camera . . . should have had one on the water filter . . . anything that you might be grabbing from the pack a few times a day . . . I don't know how many people have asked me on the trail, "Did you see a camera back there by the lake?" 

      I'd be happy to get it back to you (like the DOWN JACKET I found, or the very nice multi-tool) but without some sort of label . . . it's probably walking with someone. In the case of a camera, you can label it, but you could also snap a picture of your address or e-mail OR A PICTURE OF YOU . . . so that when I find it and scroll through your shots, I can say, yeah, I saw that guy. 

      BOB
      http://www.summitpost.org/plans/view_activity.php?post_id=6480



    • ed_rodriguez52@yahoo.com
      Yea good point. That was the problem I had when I got to TM after I pick up my resupply box and went to back to the campground to re pack my canister had all
      Message 2 of 4 , Mar 3, 2011
        Yea good point. That was the problem I had when I got to TM after I pick up my resupply box and went to back to the campground to re pack my canister had all my gear out and did not put everything back before I went to the visitor center. I just got lazy and thru everything into the bear box at my campsite. Lesson learn not to self. Put everything back

        Sent on the Sprint® Now Network from my BlackBerry®


        From: robert shattuck <bobolonius@...>
        Sender: johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com
        Date: Thu, 3 Mar 2011 22:16:23 +0000
        To: <johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com>
        ReplyTo: johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: [John Muir Trail] things get lost more than stolen . . .

         

        I've never had a problem or caught scent of someone even thinking about nabbing my gear . . . but I've managed to leave behind one water filter. I've gotten in the habit when getting something out of the pack, of zipping it right back up, so nothing falls out should I throw the pack on. 


        I carry my "canister quarter" (someone drilled the quarter and I found it on the street ) on a length of cord, that makes it easier to retrieve in my pocket, especially if I am wearing gloves. 

        I've also got in the habit of knowing which pocket things go in and keeping it that way and most importantly, I start every morning by laying out my sleeping pad (since it's the last thing I strap onto the pack) and then emptying the tent contents onto it . . . bottles, glasses, socks, whatever things I've stashed in the tent pockets for the night . . . everything gets collected on the pad––the tent gets broken down, stuffed and so on until all you have is an empty pad.

        I should just spray paint shadows on the pad, like you might do at your work bench :) 

        I lost my water filter by hanging it in a tree one night, not any higher than I could reach, but then forgot it in the morning, probably because I was looking all over the ground, but not in the trees for my stuff. 

        I also use those lovely address labels that organizations send you in the hopes of getting money. I slap them on my poles, my camera . . . should have had one on the water filter . . . anything that you might be grabbing from the pack a few times a day . . . I don't know how many people have asked me on the trail, "Did you see a camera back there by the lake?" 

        I'd be happy to get it back to you (like the DOWN JACKET I found, or the very nice multi-tool) but without some sort of label . . . it's probably walking with someone. In the case of a camera, you can label it, but you could also snap a picture of your address or e-mail OR A PICTURE OF YOU . . . so that when I find it and scroll through your shots, I can say, yeah, I saw that guy. 

        BOB
        http://www.summitpost.org/plans/view_activity.php?post_id=6480



      • Karpani
        The labels, Bob.  GREAT suggestion.  So simple, it s like one of those duh things.  I might not have thought of it until I lost something.  Thanks.
        Message 3 of 4 , Mar 3, 2011
          The labels, Bob.  GREAT suggestion.  So simple, it's like one of those "duh" things.  I might not have thought of it until I lost something.  Thanks.
          Karpani

          --- On Thu, 3/3/11, robert shattuck <bobolonius@...> wrote:

          From: robert shattuck <bobolonius@...>
          Subject: [John Muir Trail] things get lost more than stolen . . .
          To: johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com
          Date: Thursday, March 3, 2011, 2:16 PM

           

          I've never had a problem or caught scent of someone even thinking about nabbing my gear . . . but I've managed to leave behind one water filter. I've gotten in the habit when getting something out of the pack, of zipping it right back up, so nothing falls out should I throw the pack on. 


          I carry my "canister quarter" (someone drilled the quarter and I found it on the street ) on a length of cord, that makes it easier to retrieve in my pocket, especially if I am wearing gloves. 

          I've also got in the habit of knowing which pocket things go in and keeping it that way and most importantly, I start every morning by laying out my sleeping pad (since it's the last thing I strap onto the pack) and then emptying the tent contents onto it . . . bottles, glasses, socks, whatever things I've stashed in the tent pockets for the night . . . everything gets collected on the pad––the tent gets broken down, stuffed and so on until all you have is an empty pad.

          I should just spray paint shadows on the pad, like you might do at your work bench :) 

          I lost my water filter by hanging it in a tree one night, not any higher than I could reach, but then forgot it in the morning, probably because I was looking all over the ground, but not in the trees for my stuff. 

          I also use those lovely address labels that organizations send you in the hopes of getting money. I slap them on my poles, my camera . . . should have had one on the water filter . . . anything that you might be grabbing from the pack a few times a day . . . I don't know how many people have asked me on the trail, "Did you see a camera back there by the lake?" 

          I'd be happy to get it back to you (like the DOWN JACKET I found, or the very nice multi-tool) but without some sort of label . . . it's probably walking with someone. In the case of a camera, you can label it, but you could also snap a picture of your address or e-mail OR A PICTURE OF YOU . . . so that when I find it and scroll through your shots, I can say, yeah, I saw that guy. 

          BOB
          http://www.summitpost.org/plans/view_activity.php?post_id=6480



        • John Ladd
          My loss problems almost always arise because I start to talk to someone at a rest stop. If I get up to go back on the trail on my own schedule, I remember to
          Message 4 of 4 , Mar 5, 2011
            My loss problems almost always arise because I start to talk to someone at a rest stop.  If I get up to go back on the trail on my own schedule, I remember to look around for things on the ground.  If I am in the middle of a conversation, and the person I'm talking to takes off, I tend to just take off with them without checking the area (and regret it later).

            John Curran Ladd
            1616 Castro Street
            San Francisco, CA  94114-3707
            415-648-9279


            On Thu, Mar 3, 2011 at 2:16 PM, robert shattuck <bobolonius@...> wrote:
             

            I've never had a problem or caught scent of someone even thinking about nabbing my gear . . . but I've managed to leave behind one water filter. I've gotten in the habit when getting something out of the pack, of zipping it right back up, so nothing falls out should I throw the pack on. 


            I carry my "canister quarter" (someone drilled the quarter and I found it on the street ) on a length of cord, that makes it easier to retrieve in my pocket, especially if I am wearing gloves. 

            I've also got in the habit of knowing which pocket things go in and keeping it that way and most importantly, I start every morning by laying out my sleeping pad (since it's the last thing I strap onto the pack) and then emptying the tent contents onto it . . . bottles, glasses, socks, whatever things I've stashed in the tent pockets for the night . . . everything gets collected on the pad––the tent gets broken down, stuffed and so on until all you have is an empty pad.

            I should just spray paint shadows on the pad, like you might do at your work bench :) 

            I lost my water filter by hanging it in a tree one night, not any higher than I could reach, but then forgot it in the morning, probably because I was looking all over the ground, but not in the trees for my stuff. 

            I also use those lovely address labels that organizations send you in the hopes of getting money. I slap them on my poles, my camera . . . should have had one on the water filter . . . anything that you might be grabbing from the pack a few times a day . . . I don't know how many people have asked me on the trail, "Did you see a camera back there by the lake?" 

            I'd be happy to get it back to you (like the DOWN JACKET I found, or the very nice multi-tool) but without some sort of label . . . it's probably walking with someone. In the case of a camera, you can label it, but you could also snap a picture of your address or e-mail OR A PICTURE OF YOU . . . so that when I find it and scroll through your shots, I can say, yeah, I saw that guy. 

            BOB

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