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Season start date

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  • connorpjackson
    I just had a quick question. I am planning on beginning my thru-hike on June 12 and am experienced in snow camping. Do you think this is too early in the
    Message 1 of 16 , Feb 23, 2011
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      I just had a quick question. I am planning on beginning my thru-hike on June 12 and am experienced in snow camping. Do you think this is too early in the season? Thanks.
    • Gary Alderson
          Gary Alderson   ________________________________ From: connorpjackson To: johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com Sent: Wed,
      Message 2 of 16 , Feb 23, 2011
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        Gary Alderson

         




        From: connorpjackson <connorpauljackson@...>
        To: johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com
        Sent: Wed, February 23, 2011 7:43:24 PM
        Subject: [John Muir Trail] Season start date

         

        I just had a quick question. I am planning on beginning my thru-hike on June 12 and am experienced in snow camping. Do you think this is too early in the season? Thanks.


      • Roleigh Martin
        Where s Ned when you need him? Email Ned ( ned@mountaineducation.org ) -- he is our JMT snow season resident expert. I would think going on my poor memory
        Message 3 of 16 , Feb 23, 2011
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          Where's Ned when you need him?  Email Ned ( ned@... ) -- he is our JMT snow season resident expert.

          I would think going on my poor memory that for someone experienced in snow camping, that some PCT hikers might do their JMT segment around that time too.  Be interesting to see how this thread goes.

          A good place to cross-post would be a PCT group as I'd bet you get several posters there who've made it up the PCT to the Sierras in June.

          I remember in my 11 years of high sierra hiking I did do a mid-June hike once, it was interesting but I never got beyond 9500 feet then.  I was really new to High Sierra hiking at the time.


          On Wed, Feb 23, 2011 at 8:43 PM, connorpjackson <connorpauljackson@...> wrote:
           

          I just had a quick question. I am planning on beginning my thru-hike on June 12 and am experienced in snow camping. Do you think this is too early in the season? Thanks.


        • ned@mountaineducation.org
          Alright, Roleigh, I knew my ears were ringing for a reason! Connor--there is so much to say about early season thru hiking, whether on the PCT or JMT. The
          Message 4 of 16 , Feb 23, 2011
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            Alright, Roleigh, I knew my ears were ringing for a reason!
             
            Connor--there is so much to say about early season thru hiking, whether on the PCT or JMT. The Sierra is spectacular for all the snow, water everywhere, and little flowers just poking out in the marshes and muck all over. As long as the snow is consolidated, it is avalanche-safe and exhilarating to be in!
             
            At our You Tube video of the trip last May and June http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=po7gWQzrrGw you will see exactly what it was like, especially for our boots!
             
            As we say at Mountain Education, "It doesn't matter whether you're walking on 6 inches or 6 feet of snow, the techniques for dealing with it are the same." So, leave early and give yourself more time in which to soak up the High Sierra!
             
             

            "Just remember, Be Careful out there!"
             
            Ned Tibbits, Director
            Mountain Education
            1106A Ski Run Blvd
            South Lake Tahoe, Ca. 96150
                P: 888-996-8333
                F: 530-541-1456
                C: 530-721-1551
                http://www.mountaineducation.org
          • Peter Burke
            ... in 1988 we did a full Muir Trail in starting in mid June and it was less snow than last summer in mid July. When you can expect a reasonably dry and snow
            Message 5 of 16 , Feb 24, 2011
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              > I remember in my 11 years of high sierra hiking I did do a mid-June
              > hike once, it was interesting but I never got beyond 9500 feet then.
              > I was really new to High Sierra hiking at the time.
              >

              in 1988 we did a full Muir Trail in starting in mid June and it was less
              snow than last summer in mid July. When you can expect a reasonably
              dry and snow free trail has to do with how much snow falls, when it
              falls, and how warm it is in May and early June. Stream crossings were
              low (just the usual two late season crossings), and bugs were out in
              force. That winter was about 40% of normal drought condition precip, and
              we are already over 100% right now, with more snow on the way in the
              current wave of storms, plus enough time for another wave.

              I'd say this June you want to have guaranteed waterproof shoes or
              gaiters for continued snow travel (multiple miles at Muir Pass for
              sure), crampons, snow shoes, and be very experienced in deep water
              stream crossings. The snow is not the dangerous part of an early season
              hike, but the water runoff that would be near its peak at that time and
              should not be underestimated. It was tough for some people to cross the
              larger streams on the JMT last year in July, after the runoff had
              already slowed down.

              On the other hand, in early season you'll get a fantastically alpine
              experience, not the usual burned out and horseshit-enhanced arid late
              summer JMT. I prefer early season over late, also for the longer days
              and smaller crowds at that time. Just do not go alone and be well
              prepared for raging water. Learn about how to cross fast moving streams
              safely, and if necessary be prepared to hike large detours to find safer
              spots to cross. These things can kill you.

              For summer 2011, based on current snow levels, I think the earliest I'd
              go without having graduated from a Bear Grylls stream crossing seminar
              would be he third week of June. By the time you'd get to the first
              critical water crossings (after Silver Pass).
            • connorpjackson
              Great, thanks for all of your help. Because Whitney permits are due by March 15, it ll really be a guessing game for how the snowfall in June/July is based on
              Message 6 of 16 , Feb 24, 2011
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                Great, thanks for all of your help. Because Whitney permits are due by March 15, it'll really be a guessing game for how the snowfall in June/July is based on the May and June temperatures... is it safe to assume that it will be an especially deep snowfall with all of the rain we have already received this season? My concern is not with the snow, but rather, in dealing with the river crossings, which may be a more dangerous game than I want to bargain with.

                --- In johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com, <ned@...> wrote:
                >
                > Alright, Roleigh, I knew my ears were ringing for a reason!
                >
                > Connor--there is so much to say about early season thru hiking, whether on the PCT or JMT. The Sierra is spectacular for all the snow, water everywhere, and little flowers just poking out in the marshes and muck all over. As long as the snow is consolidated, it is avalanche-safe and exhilarating to be in!
                >
                > At our You Tube video of the trip last May and June http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=po7gWQzrrGw you will see exactly what it was like, especially for our boots!
                >
                > As we say at Mountain Education, "It doesn't matter whether you're walking on 6 inches or 6 feet of snow, the techniques for dealing with it are the same." So, leave early and give yourself more time in which to soak up the High Sierra!
                >
                >
                >
                > "Just remember, Be Careful out there!"
                >
                > Ned Tibbits, Director
                > Mountain Education
                > 1106A Ski Run Blvd
                > South Lake Tahoe, Ca. 96150
                > P: 888-996-8333
                > F: 530-541-1456
                > C: 530-721-1551
                > http://www.mountaineducation.org
                >
              • Peter Burke
                ... regarding permits - check out this listing how many Whitney entry permits were not used in June 2010
                Message 7 of 16 , Feb 24, 2011
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                  On 2/24/2011 2:26 PM, connorpjackson wrote:
                  > Great, thanks for all of your help. Because Whitney permits are due by March 15, it'll really be a guessing game for how the snowfall in June/July is based on the May and June temperatures...


                  regarding permits - check out this listing how many Whitney entry
                  permits were not used in June 2010

                  http://www.whitneyzone.com/wz/ubbthreads.php/topics/3436#Post3436

                  e.g. June 15 2010, there were 37 unused overnight permits and every
                  single day of the month had at least 8 unused overnight permits. I
                  wouldn't bother to reserve anything if I wasn't sure about the exact
                  start date in June. Later in July things get a little tigher, though

                  River crossings:

                  I like to show this image from a usually easy crossing on July 17, 2010
                  http://didnt.doit.wisc.edu/outdoor/gallery/JMT2010/20100717/slides/DSC_1402.jpg

                  Evolution Creek, July 20 - I am 6'2" - note the shore line erosion goes
                  much higher:
                  http://didnt.doit.wisc.edu/outdoor/gallery/JMT2010/20100720/slides/DSC_1540.jpg
                  and it can be a long way across, even in a team:
                  http://didnt.doit.wisc.edu/outdoor/gallery/JMT2010/20100720/slides/DSC_1551.jpg

                  Peter
                • Ed Rodriguez
                  Last year we started on July 6 SOBO and the creek crossing that gave us the most problem was down from Silver pass as you climb down and cross the Silver Pass
                  Message 8 of 16 , Feb 24, 2011
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                    Last year we started on July 6 SOBO and the creek crossing that gave us the most problem was down from Silver pass as you climb down and cross the Silver Pass Creek (where the water fall is at) the creek crossing after that (North Fork Mono Creek?) gave us the most problem in the thou out the JMT. There was allot of white water and the current was very strong for us. We heard so much about Bear Creek before we cross it  and ounce we did cross it was not as bad as everyone picture it. I be leave the key is a person knowledge and skills crossing the creek that you will face. As you on your journey just ask people that you come across how the creek crossing that you are approaching. This year because am going solo am going deal with the crossing a little diffidently am planning to take my time and go up and down stream to find the best way to cross. Good Luck 
                     

                    From: connorpjackson <connorpauljackson@...>
                    To: johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com
                    Sent: Thu, February 24, 2011 12:26:03 PM
                    Subject: Re: [John Muir Trail] Season start date

                     

                    Great, thanks for all of your help. Because Whitney permits are due by March 15, it'll really be a guessing game for how the snowfall in June/July is based on the May and June temperatures... is it safe to assume that it will be an especially deep snowfall with all of the rain we have already received this season? My concern is not with the snow, but rather, in dealing with the river crossings, which may be a more dangerous game than I want to bargain with.

                    --- In johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com, <ned@...> wrote:
                    >
                    > Alright, Roleigh, I knew my ears were ringing for a reason!
                    >
                    > Connor--there is so much to say about early season thru hiking, whether on the PCT or JMT. The Sierra is spectacular for all the snow, water everywhere, and little flowers just poking out in the marshes and muck all over. As long as the snow is consolidated, it is avalanche-safe and exhilarating to be in!
                    >
                    > At our You Tube video of the trip last May and June http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=po7gWQzrrGw you will see exactly what it was like, especially for our boots!
                    >
                    > As we say at Mountain Education, "It doesn't matter whether you're walking on 6 inches or 6 feet of snow, the techniques for dealing with it are the same." So, leave early and give yourself more time in which to soak up the High Sierra!
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    > "Just remember, Be Careful out there!"
                    >
                    > Ned Tibbits, Director
                    > Mountain Education
                    > 1106A Ski Run Blvd
                    > South Lake Tahoe, Ca. 96150
                    > P: 888-996-8333
                    > F: 530-541-1456
                    > C: 530-721-1551
                    > http://www.mountaineducation.org
                    >


                  • ned@mountaineducation.org
                    Great pictures, Peter! A couple of suggestions for Connor: If you can t get a permit via Whitney Portal for when you want to start, just enter to the south,
                    Message 9 of 16 , Feb 24, 2011
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                      Great pictures, Peter!
                       
                      A couple of suggestions for Connor:
                       
                      If you can't get a permit via Whitney Portal for when you want to start, just enter to the south, via Cottonwood Pass (I'm sure this has been said already). If you're not in perfect trail shape, start at Kennedy Meadows and take the first week to acclimatize, work out the "bugs," modify them with a resupply at Horseshoe Meadows (Lone Pine), and get stronger for that Whitney climb while you work your way up to Crabtree. Just an idea that worked great for us last year.
                       
                      Regarding Creek Crossings that first picture Peter linked was a "classic" of a nasty, on-trail crossing. Even the Evolution crossing during high water was where the trail crosses. Peter, am I correct, here? Our advice is to follow the adage, "STOP" when you reach any crossing (Stop, Think, Observe, Plan), put down your pack, and get a bite to eat while searching up the creek for shallower water or a log or rock-hop crossing. It is not necessary to cross a creek where the summer trail does. Be safe and look around for somewhere better. Once on the other side, change your socks and head back to the trail. We teach these techniques every year to our students and should have some video out in the future for all those interested in what the creeks really look like.
                       
                      My point is that the Ranger in McClure should have signs out indicating where the safest crossing can be found (southbound it is a fair distance to the east of the trail crossing, maybe a quarter-mile along the south side of the river). You can see a piece of our crossing (just the height of the river, which was only just above the knee) at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=po7gWQzrrGw. This crossing was on July 5th, 2010 after an unusually heavy and snowy winter, but not as heavy as this year as can be seen if you compare our photos of the Echo Lake Chalet over the years' of our Snow Skills Training Courses posted at the Mountain Education Facebook page. http://www.facebook.com/home.php#!/photos.php?id=157155614308934
                       

                      "Just remember, Be Careful out there!"
                       
                      Ned Tibbits, Director
                      Mountain Education
                      1106A Ski Run Blvd
                      South Lake Tahoe, Ca. 96150
                          P: 888-996-8333
                          F: 530-541-1456
                          C: 530-721-1551
                          http://www.mountaineducation.org
                    • Peter Burke
                      ... yes that is Evolution at the regular crossing. It s easier a little bit up stream, but we needed a bath anyway, and felt after all the creeks we had
                      Message 10 of 16 , Feb 24, 2011
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                        On 2/24/2011 3:33 PM, ned@... wrote:
                        Regarding Creek Crossings that first picture Peter linked was a "classic" of a nasty, on-trail crossing. Even the Evolution crossing during high water was where the trail crosses. Peter, am I correct, here?

                        yes that is Evolution at the regular crossing. It's easier a little bit up stream, but we needed a bath anyway, and felt after all the creeks we had crossed that this one wouldn't be bad. Bear Creek was harder, mostly because there is more  current and the river bed is rougher with larger boulders. We had to help a few people across who didn't feel confident. At the crossing below Silver we met somebody who lost a hiking pole in the white stuff, and pretty much everywhere on the trail where it usually is just boulder hopping people were wondering if shoes had to come off.

                        don't have Bear Creek crossing pictures (too busy carrying packs for the kids and others, I think I crossed more than 10 times), but this one was taken at one of the side streams heading up there, and this is a place you normally don't even take your boots off, hopping across with the help of a rock and a tree trunk

                        http://didnt.doit.wisc.edu/outdoor/gallery/JMT2010/20100719/slides/DSC_1470.jpg

                        this is what Bear Creek looked like on that day, July 19, 2010
                        http://didnt.doit.wisc.edu/outdoor/gallery/JMT2010/20100719/slides/DSC_1468.jpg

                        and the relatively harmless looking crossing
                        http://didnt.doit.wisc.edu/outdoor/gallery/JMT2010/20100719/slides/DSC_1471.jpg

                        it was deeper than Evolution, and the water moved faster.

                        One thing I learned that day - water levels don't always drop overnight to be lower the next morning. That day we purposely camped short of the crossing, hoping the water would drop some inches overnight with the cool down overnight. That's the myth at least. Well, by 7am the water was actually 2 inches higher than the night before. D'oh!


                        My point is that the Ranger in McClure should have signs out indicating where the safest crossing can be found (southbound it is a fair distance to the east of the trail crossing, maybe a quarter-mile along the south side of the river).

                        Last two summers, there was a little note on a tree to point out the easier crossing upstream, easily missed. However, the high water levels in recent years have helped develop a real use trail that can be seen along the south shore. That alone seems to point out to some hikers that you can keep hiking up for a better spot to cross.

                      • ned@mountaineducation.org
                        Peter, I love the way you put things ( horseshit-enhanced...)! Just wanted to add a bit: For early season snow travel, you do not need crampons and maybe not
                        Message 11 of 16 , Feb 24, 2011
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                          Peter, I love the way you put things ("horseshit-enhanced...)!
                           
                          Just wanted to add a bit:
                           
                          For early season snow travel, you do not need crampons and maybe not even traction aids like the Katoola microspikes http://www.kahtoola.com/microspikes.php (which we very much shy from for use on those typical crusty, sloped-ascent mornings in the Sierra), especially if you have good leather hiking boots with the classic Vibram soles.
                           
                          The early Sierra is just as Peter said, beautiful beyond imagine with the water everywhere, little flowers just poking up, snow, rock, and blue sky in contrasts, and that clean air! To do the JMT "early" does not require a technical course in snow travel, but your trip would be safer after taking one of Mountain Education's "Basic" Snow Skills Training Courses. We do offer as of this year an Intermediate-level Course that will last 10 days and apply what was learned on the Basic into a daily-moving, typical backpacker type format to truly prepare summer hikers for Springtime (trips will be in May) and snow hiking challenges.
                           
                          To agree with Peter, creek crossings are dangerous. Look for a better place to cross than at the trail, leave your hiking boots on (to protect your feet), change your socks on the other side, use a third or fourth leg (your hiking poles or a long stick) for balance control, use the STOP method to evaluate the creek when you first get there, upstream may be smaller, narrower, or smoother,  and have rock-hops or log crossings. We teach this, too. If there is enough interest in Springtime High Sierra hiking along the JMT, we will offer such training trips (10-day versions or the full month-long TM - Whitney). Email us if you are interested.
                           
                           

                          "Just remember, Be Careful out there!"
                           
                          Ned Tibbits, Director
                          Mountain Education
                          1106A Ski Run Blvd
                          South Lake Tahoe, Ca. 96150
                              P: 888-996-8333
                              F: 530-541-1456
                              C: 530-721-1551
                              http://www.mountaineducation.org
                        • hmdsierra
                          When my Son and I did the trail in Aug of 82 we had plenty of high water. However, we rarely had to get wet. In fact Evolution Ck was the only wade. The
                          Message 12 of 16 , Feb 24, 2011
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                            When my Son and I did the trail in Aug of 82 we had plenty of high water. However, we rarely had to get wet. In fact Evolution Ck was the only wade. The rest of the time we looked up and down and could find logs or rocks to get us across. The most luck we had was Bear Ck. Two trees had fallen on the island below the crossing, one from each side so we had a bridge. The following year in July, with Marie Lk stil frozen we had to wade and it was cold.

                            --- In johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com, Ed Rodriguez <ed_rodriguez52@...> wrote:
                            >
                            > Last year we started on July 6 SOBO and the creek crossing that gave us the most
                            > problem was down from Silver pass as you climb down and cross the Silver Pass
                            > Creek (where the water fall is at) the creek crossing after that (North Fork
                            > Mono Creek?) gave us the most problem in the thou out the JMT. There was allot
                            > of white water and the current was very strong for us. We heard so much about
                            > Bear Creek before we cross it and ounce we did cross it was not as bad as
                            > everyone picture it. I be leave the key is a person knowledge and skills
                            > crossing the creek that you will face. As you on your journey just ask people
                            > that you come across how the creek crossing that you are approaching. This year
                            > because am going solo am going deal with the crossing a little diffidently am
                            > planning to take my time and go up and down stream to find the best way to
                            > cross. Good Luck
                            >
                            >
                            >
                            > ________________________________
                            > From: connorpjackson <connorpauljackson@...>
                            > To: johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com
                            > Sent: Thu, February 24, 2011 12:26:03 PM
                            > Subject: Re: [John Muir Trail] Season start date
                            >
                            >
                            > Great, thanks for all of your help. Because Whitney permits are due by March
                            > 15, it'll really be a guessing game for how the snowfall in June/July is based
                            > on the May and June temperatures... is it safe to assume that it will be an
                            > especially deep snowfall with all of the rain we have already received this
                            > season? My concern is not with the snow, but rather, in dealing with the river
                            > crossings, which may be a more dangerous game than I want to bargain with.
                            >
                            > --- In johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com, <ned@> wrote:
                            > >
                            > > Alright, Roleigh, I knew my ears were ringing for a reason!
                            > >
                            > > Connor--there is so much to say about early season thru hiking, whether on the
                            > >PCT or JMT. The Sierra is spectacular for all the snow, water everywhere, and
                            > >little flowers just poking out in the marshes and muck all over. As long as the
                            > >snow is consolidated, it is avalanche-safe and exhilarating to be in!
                            > >
                            > > At our You Tube video of the trip last May and June
                            > >http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=po7gWQzrrGw you will see exactly what it was
                            > >like, especially for our boots!
                            > >
                            > > As we say at Mountain Education, "It doesn't matter whether you're walking on 6
                            > >inches or 6 feet of snow, the techniques for dealing with it are the same." So,
                            > >leave early and give yourself more time in which to soak up the High Sierra!
                            > >
                            > >
                            > >
                            > > "Just remember, Be Careful out there!"
                            > >
                            > > Ned Tibbits, Director
                            > > Mountain Education
                            > > 1106A Ski Run Blvd
                            > > South Lake Tahoe, Ca. 96150
                            > > P: 888-996-8333
                            > > F: 530-541-1456
                            > > C: 530-721-1551
                            > > http://www.mountaineducation.org
                            > >
                            >
                          • Peter Burke
                            ... 1982 was a different period in this planet s climate history. That is when external frame humanoids still roamed the Sierras and /Ursus americanus/ would
                            Message 13 of 16 , Feb 25, 2011
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                              On 2/24/2011 7:26 PM, hmdsierra wrote:
                              When my Son and I did the trail in Aug of 82 we had plenty of high water. 
                              

                              1982 was a different period in this planet's climate history. That is when external frame humanoids still roamed the Sierras and Ursus americanus would prey on granola bars and Spagetti-ohs in habitats now called "camp sites."  Global temperatures were cooler and winters lasted longer.

                              Now the only way you get the big summer snows is when the warmer air masses that do carry more water on average actually do hit the Sierra hard and deposit enough snow that will resist early melting.
                               
                            • hmdsierra
                              I used a Kelty that I got in 1967. In fact it is the lony pack I ver ever had. I haven t made a trip since 2000 but the Kelty made it too. I ve had a couple
                              Message 14 of 16 , Feb 25, 2011
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                                I used a Kelty that I got in 1967. In fact it is the lony pack I'ver ever had. I haven't made a trip since 2000 but the Kelty made it too. I've had a couple of comments about how antiquated it is one around '81 and again in '91.
                                The point is that '82 was a wet year with plenty of late Spring storms. Many PCT'ers were bypassing the High Sierra and planning on coming back after they finished PCT. We started the 1so of August and had snow on every pass except Island Pass and Trail Crest. Getting up Donahue involved cross country travel as the north side was snow from the top down to the small lake. We had a snowcone at the lake before starting up. Despite this we were, with a little looking, able to find dry crossings on all but Evolution Ck, and that we went up stream and crossed less than waist deep. My Son was 10 years old and it was fine for him. We were just lucky on Bear Ck to have a pair of bridges. At the S Fork Kings we watched a guy prepare to wade the crossing while less than 50 yards upstream we crossed on logs or rocks without getting damp and were on our war to Lake Marjorie.

                                --- In johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com, Peter Burke <pburke@...> wrote:
                                >
                                > On 2/24/2011 7:26 PM, hmdsierra wrote:
                                > > When my Son and I did the trail in Aug of 82 we had plenty of high water.
                                >
                                > 1982 was a different period in this planet's climate history. That is
                                > when external frame humanoids still roamed the Sierras and /Ursus
                                > americanus/ would prey on granola bars and Spagetti-ohs in habitats now
                                > called "camp sites." Global temperatures were cooler and winters lasted
                                > longer.
                                >
                                > Now the only way you get the big summer snows is when the warmer air
                                > masses that do carry more water on average actually do hit the Sierra
                                > hard and deposit enough snow that will resist early melting.
                                >
                              • Kim Fishburn
                                Anyone know of a good website for animal tracks?
                                Message 15 of 16 , Mar 2, 2011
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                                  Anyone know of a good website for animal tracks?
                                • John Ladd
                                  On Wed, Mar 2, 2011 at 7:09 AM, Kim Fishburn wrote: Anyone know of a good website for animal tracks? What I did to make my collection
                                  Message 16 of 16 , Mar 6, 2011
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                                    On Wed, Mar 2, 2011 at 7:09 AM, Kim Fishburn <outhiking_55@...> wrote:
                                      Anyone know of a good website for animal tracks?

                                    What I did to make my collection (which I then print on a single sheet)

                                    Go to Google Images

                                    http://www.google.com/imghp?hl=en&tab=ii

                                    Enter "tracks" in the search box.

                                    On the left side of the screen, chose "Black and white"

                                    Or get fancy and put this in the search box

                                    tracks "black bear" OR marmot OR pika ...

                                    using whatever animals you are interested in

                                    Complete YOS species list at

                                    http://www.nps.gov/yose/naturescience/mammal-species-list.htm

                                    Or, for one-stop shopping of some relevant species, though not particularly well-adapted to the JMT, see this site

                                    http://www.bear-tracker.com/mammals.html

                                    or

                                    http://www.bear-tracker.com/guide.html

                                    If you want to be super-helpful about this, see this form to list any Yosemite sightings and mail it in at the end of your trip

                                    http://www.nps.gov/yose/naturescience/upload/YOSE_wildfrm1and2_one%20page.%202008%20rev.pdf

                                    From your friendly research librarian

                                    John Curran Ladd
                                    1616 Castro Street
                                    San Francisco, CA  94114-3707
                                    415-648-9279


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