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Re: [John Muir Trail] best way to heat water?

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  • Dan McGuire
    Hey, My two cents, which is probably only worth half of that follows: White gas (ie whisperlite or some such) overkill for the trail. Heavy. Loud. Not needed
    Message 1 of 7 , Apr 16, 2006
      Hey,

      My two cents, which is probably only worth half of that follows:

      White gas (ie whisperlite or some such) overkill for the trail. Heavy. Loud. Not needed for the meals you're cooking.
      Esbit - stinky, can be very hard to light, especially in a bit of a breeze, once they get going they go like gangbusters, can leave a nasty residue, impossible to accidentally spill. Easy to toss in a resupply box, though probably illegal to ship. Nice to have a couple as a back up, but I stopped using as a cooking source due to issues noted above.
      Alcohol (cat can stove, pepsi can stove, etc) - easy and simple. Fuel is available in Red's Meadow and in VVR. Simple, lightweight, quiet and odor free. My personal favorite.

      Hope that helps a bit,

      Scooter

      ----- Original Message ----
      From: bondcliff48 <sam.clint@...>
      To: johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com
      Sent: Sunday, April 16, 2006 3:09:30 PM
      Subject: [John Muir Trail] best way to heat water?

      I'm going to be doing the JMT in late Aug and would like some comments
      on the type of stove to bring. The choices are white gas, alcohol,
      and solid fuel stoves. I plan on doing mostly dehydrated meals, so I
      plan on heating water for the dinner meal only. I'm leaning toward
      the Esbit type but would like to hear from other about the pros and
      cons.

      Thanks.





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    • tubirrb
      Each fuel types has its good and bad points. Personally, I went from white gas to gas cannisters to Esbit. I ve used only Esbit stoves for the past 5 years.
      Message 2 of 7 , Apr 16, 2006
        Each fuel types has its good and bad points. Personally, I went from
        white gas to gas cannisters to Esbit. I've used only Esbit stoves
        for the past 5 years.

        Solid fuels like Esbit have one big advantage (for me) on the trail -
        you can not spill them, thereby eliminating loss and/or a rapidly
        spreading fire (or fire hazard). Knock over your liquid fuel and
        it's GONE while you still have days to go. Pressurized cylinders can
        and do leak, usually because you forgot to completely close the
        stove valve. Alcohol bothers me because the flame is invisible when
        it burns. All other fuels produce a visible flame so I don't
        accidentally pick up a burning stove.

        Esbit tablets - at 1/2 ounce each - are so light that I can carry a
        3 week supply if I want. If you leave them sealed, they slip neatly
        (and unnoticed) into your resupply boxes. No chance of spontaneous
        combustion. They require an open flame to ignite. Safest of all
        fuels to ship and possibly the least likely to cause a problem even
        if discovered in the package (most folks won't even know what they
        are if you take them out of the red box).

        With solid fuels, you always know precisely how much you have left,
        both in your pack and under your stove. Liquids require me to open
        the bottle (and risk spilling it. Pressurized gas cylinders are a
        pure guess based on past experience (how many times can I boil a
        given amount of water before the thing is empty, and did I mark each
        use on the side or did I miss one?). Then there is the packaging
        issue - you have to carry all this out with you and that means bulk
        and weight.

        Bottom line - unless I'm going out in cold weather where I really
        need the BTUs, I'll take my Esbit. For snow camping and the cold,
        I'll take white gas.


        Wandering Bob
      • paul ahonen
        Hi I have a Whisperlite, Esbit, and an alcohol stove. I also like to carry dehydrated meals on long hikes where all I have to do is boil water for it and have
        Message 3 of 7 , Apr 16, 2006
          Hi
          I have a Whisperlite, Esbit, and an alcohol stove. I also like to carry dehydrated meals on long hikes where all I have to do is boil water for it and have enough for a cup of tea. My favorite by far for long hikes is the Vargo titanium alchole stove. It burns alcohol and just in case you can flip it over and burn solid fuel tabs.
          I have in a 3/4 liter pot the stove, a 4oz cup (just for measuring), a package of fuel tabs, a wash rag and a bottle of soap. The last 2 items are to keep everything from moving around. I put the pot in a stuff sack with 2- 8 oz bottles of alcohol fuel I wrap my wind screen around one of the bottles, and a plastic fork and spoon. all this fits into one nice small size stuff sack.
          The stove boiled 3 cups of water in about 7 min.

          However if you want to boil alot of water fast my whisperlight boiled 6 cups of water in about 5 min

          Check out the Vargo stove don't let it's size and weight fool you I think it is great.
          I am going to hike the JMT hopfully in 2007 and the Vargo stove is the one I am going to take.

          Whichever you choose good luck and have fun on the hike I am jealous I can't go this year I am getting married

          Happy Trails Paul


          Dan McGuire <dwmcguire@...> wrote:
          Hey,

          My two cents, which is probably only worth half of that follows:

          White gas (ie whisperlite or some such) overkill for the trail. Heavy. Loud. Not needed for the meals you're cooking.
          Esbit - stinky, can be very hard to light, especially in a bit of a breeze, once they get going they go like gangbusters, can leave a nasty residue, impossible to accidentally spill. Easy to toss in a resupply box, though probably illegal to ship. Nice to have a couple as a back up, but I stopped using as a cooking source due to issues noted above.
          Alcohol (cat can stove, pepsi can stove, etc) - easy and simple. Fuel is available in Red's Meadow and in VVR. Simple, lightweight, quiet and odor free. My personal favorite.

          Hope that helps a bit,

          Scooter

          ----- Original Message ----
          From: bondcliff48 <sam.clint@...>
          To: johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com
          Sent: Sunday, April 16, 2006 3:09:30 PM
          Subject: [John Muir Trail] best way to heat water?

          I'm going to be doing the JMT in late Aug and would like some comments
          on the type of stove to bring. The choices are white gas, alcohol,
          and solid fuel stoves. I plan on doing mostly dehydrated meals, so I
          plan on heating water for the dinner meal only. I'm leaning toward
          the Esbit type but would like to hear from other about the pros and
          cons.

          Thanks.





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          To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
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          Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms of Service.






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        • Frank Martin
          ... I dehydrate all my onw food for hiking. One thing that I usually do is start the rehydration process in advance. I take my dinner portion and add water
          Message 4 of 7 , Apr 17, 2006
            --- In johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com, "bondcliff48" <sam.clint@...> wrote:
            >
            > I'm going to be doing the JMT in late Aug and would like some comments
            > on the type of stove to bring. The choices are white gas, alcohol,
            > and solid fuel stoves. I plan on doing mostly dehydrated meals, so I
            > plan on heating water for the dinner meal only. I'm leaning toward
            > the Esbit type but would like to hear from other about the pros and
            > cons.
            >
            > Thanks.


            I dehydrate all my onw food for hiking. One thing that I usually do
            is start the rehydration process in advance. I take my dinner portion
            and add water and double bag it and hike that way with it for several
            hours before dinner.

            In your situation you are doing only one boil a day for dinner. In
            2004 I used alcohol stove and it did work well for cooking but I did
            tea and breakfast also and just found that (personally) it was a lot
            of fiddling around when I was doing it in the dark when I had just
            woke up. In 2004 I switched to a Jetboil and although there was some
            additional weight it just worked perfect for my food and cooking
            habits. I just got everything done quicker and was on the trail just
            before first light. I did the entire JMT 13 days on one 250g
            cannister and that was four boils/day.

            However if I was going to do what you are doing I would think that the
            Esbit would be perfect.


            best of luck,

            frank
          • Carol
            One thing to consider is that by late August most National Forest and National Park areas in the Sierra go into fire restrictions. Esbit or sterno can or
            Message 5 of 7 , Apr 17, 2006
              One thing to consider is that by late August most National Forest and
              National Park areas in the Sierra go into fire restrictions. Esbit or
              sterno can or alcohol or zip stoves are often illegal during fire
              restrictions and only gas (canister or white gas) stoves with an on/off
              knob are allowed.


              --- In johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com, "bondcliff48" <sam.clint@...>
              wrote:
              >
              > I'm going to be doing the JMT in late Aug and would like some
              comments
              > on the type of stove to bring. The choices are white gas, alcohol,
              > and solid fuel stoves. I plan on doing mostly dehydrated meals, so I
              > plan on heating water for the dinner meal only. I'm leaning toward
              > the Esbit type but would like to hear from other about the pros and
              > cons.
              >
              > Thanks.
              >
            • Bob
              For the last several years I ve used Esbit fuel tabs. They are legal to ship, you have an exact idea of how much fuel to bring, and at 1/2 an ounce per boil
              Message 6 of 7 , Apr 20, 2006
                For the last several years I've used Esbit fuel tabs. They are
                legal to ship, you have an exact idea of how much fuel to bring, and
                at 1/2 an ounce per boil are difficult to beat. Ranger Carol's post
                is curious. I would think Esbit tabs present much less danger of
                starting a forest fire than alcohol (most of these stoves don't have
                on/off knobs either), but forest and park service folks may have
                lumped fuel tabs in with wood burning stoves without adequately
                considering the differences. The main pain with Esbit tabs is the
                residue left on your pot. It does come off easily with water and a
                scouring pad. - BobR

                --- In johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com, "bondcliff48" <sam.clint@...>
                wrote:
                >
                > I'm going to be doing the JMT in late Aug and would like some
                comments
                > on the type of stove to bring. The choices are white gas,
                alcohol,
                > and solid fuel stoves. I plan on doing mostly dehydrated meals,
                so
                I
                > plan on heating water for the dinner meal only. I'm leaning
                toward
                > the Esbit type but would like to hear from other about the pros
                and
                > cons.
                >
                > Thanks.
                >
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