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JMT Shelter

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  • o0distorted0o
    What type of shelter, if any, do most people use on the trail? I was thinking of bringing a 4.5lb tent... then I realized that I could cut that weight nearly
    Message 1 of 22 , Jan 4, 2011
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      What type of shelter, if any, do most people use on the trail?

      I was thinking of bringing a 4.5lb tent... then I realized that I could cut that weight nearly in half by getting a blue tarp and a outdoor research bug bivy from REI.

      So what do you use?

      Thanks!
      CK
    • Peter Burke
      ... depends on time of year and number of hikers early summer - bug proof tent mid to late summer - tarp shelter possible, but I still bring the tent: it s
      Message 2 of 22 , Jan 4, 2011
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        On 1/4/2011 4:52 PM, o0distorted0o wrote:
        > What type of shelter, if any, do most people use on the trail?
        >
        > I was thinking of bringing a 4.5lb tent... then I realized that I could cut that weight nearly in half by getting a blue tarp and a outdoor research bug bivy from REI.
        >
        > So what do you use?
        >

        depends on time of year and number of hikers

        early summer - bug proof tent

        mid to late summer - tarp shelter possible, but I still bring the tent:
        it's your home for weeks so having a nice place at night counts more
        than weight for me

        winter - bomb proof 4 season tent
      • Kim Fishburn
        In half? How about 1/4 with some combination s. Great shelters available from these sites. Just remember, these require a little more care but people here are
        Message 3 of 22 , Jan 4, 2011
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          In half? How about 1/4 with some combination's. Great shelters available from these sites. Just remember, these require a little more care but people here are really happy with them. They also don't have a warranty.

          http://www.mountainlaureldesigns.com/
          http://gossamergear.com/
          http://www.owareusa.com/
          http://www.sixmoondesigns.com/
          http://www.zpacks.com/
          http://www.bigskyinternational.com/
          http://www.bozemanmountainworks.com/
          http://www.tarptent.com/index.html



          From: o0distorted0o <o0distorted0o@...>
          To: johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com
          Sent: Tue, January 4, 2011 4:52:33 PM
          Subject: [John Muir Trail] JMT Shelter

           

          What type of shelter, if any, do most people use on the trail?

          I was thinking of bringing a 4.5lb tent... then I realized that I could cut that weight nearly in half by getting a blue tarp and a outdoor research bug bivy from REI.

          So what do you use?

          Thanks!
          CK

        • Barbara Karagosian
          Weeel, I have a Big Agnes Fly Creek UL for 1 person, wt 2lbs3oz, double walled tent with front opening and vestibule. I like the look of the Lightheart tents;
          Message 4 of 22 , Jan 4, 2011
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            Weeel, I have a Big Agnes Fly Creek UL for 1 person, wt 2lbs3oz, double walled tent with front opening and vestibule. I like the look of the Lightheart tents; these need 2 hiking poles for support. Many like the Henry Shires tarptents but I prefer double wall after last years JMT rain and hail downpour. Never believe it if someone says the Sierras are dry in summer!

            Last yr my daughter and I used a Big Agnes Copper Spur 2, which was awesome.  There's a Copper Spur for 1 as well, but it's heavier than the Fly Creek. 

            Some good sales on right now too. 

             Barbara

            On Jan 4, 2011, at 2:52 PM, "o0distorted0o" <o0distorted0o@...> wrote:

             

            What type of shelter, if any, do most people use on the trail?

            I was thinking of bringing a 4.5lb tent... then I realized that I could cut that weight nearly in half by getting a blue tarp and a outdoor research bug bivy from REI.

            So what do you use?

            Thanks!
            CK

          • Herb Stroh
            I use a Six Moons Wild Oasis tarp (about 13 ounces) and a Ti goat bivy with bug netting (6 ounces). Small, light, east to set up and take down. The Oasis has
            Message 5 of 22 , Jan 4, 2011
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              I use a Six Moons Wild Oasis tarp (about 13 ounces) and a Ti goat bivy with bug netting (6 ounces). Small, light, east to set up and take down. The Oasis has no floor, but netting from the tarp to the ground. That and the netting on the bivy handles even heavy mossies. On mild nights I just sleep out in the bivy without the tarp.

               

              Herb

               


              From: johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com [mailto:johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of o0distorted0o
              Sent: Tuesday, January 04, 2011 2:53 PM
              To: johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com
              Subject: [John Muir Trail] JMT Shelter

               

               

              What type of shelter, if any, do most people use on the trail?

              I was thinking of bringing a 4.5lb tent... then I realized that I could cut that weight nearly in half by getting a blue tarp and a outdoor research bug bivy from REI.

              So what do you use?

              Thanks!
              CK

            • robert shattuck
              What type of shelter, if any, do most people use on the trail? Do you want to suffer, survive or stretch out and enjoy a bug-free and weather-resistant night
              Message 6 of 22 , Jan 4, 2011
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                "What type of shelter, if any, do most people use on the trail?" 

                Do you want to suffer, survive or stretch out and enjoy a bug-free and weather-resistant night (several, in fact) . . . 

                I have done 'em all and I am now very happy to carry a 3.5 REI  2-man tent. Nothing like setting up  and climbing in and then being able to drag the rest of your gear in. If I wanted to splurge and spend another $100-200 bucks, I could buy a lighter tent, but assuming it's free-standing, I am only going to cut another pound or maybe two. 

                You can of course go the ultra-light route and buy a henry shires or any one of a good many ultra-lights––but my preference is to get into camp and not spend much time setting up a non free-standing tent . . . playing with the guy lines and pounding in stakes, or just having to find decent soil––often camp spots are just a good amount of sand over rock––or a tree. 

                All this being said, I admit to being lazy and tired after a long day of walking and just like the luxury that a bear canister is, I am happy to carry the weight and convenience, rather than spending precious time ( I suck at tossing rocks into trees) bagging or pitching some feather-weight tent that will no doubt fail due to my lack of attention. 

                I can set my tent up in about three minutes. BUT AGAIN, there are people who've got the UL tent thing down and do just fine. 

                Early in the season you'll be real happy you're not sweating it out in a bivy sack while a zillion hungry bugs are plastered to your tiny window. About mid-august you can usually count on the bug count going way down, but the chill factor picking up. 

                As noted by others though, you're going to be sleeping out for many nights. I did the one-man-almost-bivy-sack small tent thing one summer and it was no fun. No room to do anything and then the weather hit and the bag stuck to the frozen tent and . . . don't go there unless you're an absolute glutton or just trimming every point of every ounce . . . this one weighs 3.5, but this one weighs 3.4 and has a whistle . . . 

                I've also done the no-tent thing and again, if you're out for speed and every ounce counts, then maybe you want to suffer a few nights getting ravaged by bugs and weather––hardcore. 

                And then there are those with totally contrary experiences and opinions . . . 

                bob
                http://www.summitpost.org/plans/view_activity.php?post_id=6480






              • Linda Reitz
                Love my Big Agnes seed house for 1. 2.5 lbs. I have the 2 person tent which is a little more comfortabel but the xtra 2 lbs is not worth it. Linda
                Message 7 of 22 , Jan 5, 2011
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                  Love my Big Agnes seed house for 1. 2.5 lbs. I have the 2 person tent which is a little more comfortabel but the xtra 2 lbs is not worth it.
                  Linda


                  From: Peter Burke <pburke@...>
                  To: johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com
                  Sent: Tue, January 4, 2011 3:19:41 PM
                  Subject: Re: [John Muir Trail] JMT Shelter

                   

                  On 1/4/2011 4:52 PM, o0distorted0o wrote:
                  > What type of shelter, if any, do most people use on the trail?
                  >
                  > I was thinking of bringing a 4.5lb tent... then I realized that I could cut that weight nearly in half by getting a blue tarp and a outdoor research bug bivy from REI.
                  >
                  > So what do you use?
                  >

                  depends on time of year and number of hikers

                  early summer - bug proof tent

                  mid to late summer - tarp shelter possible, but I still bring the tent:
                  it's your home for weeks so having a nice place at night counts more
                  than weight for me

                  winter - bomb proof 4 season tent


                • John
                  As usual, lots of good and varied info. As Bob I think alluded to, it is really a matter of comfort decisions both on the trail and at camp. If you plan on
                  Message 8 of 22 , Jan 5, 2011
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                    As usual, lots of good and varied info. As Bob I think alluded to, it is really a matter of comfort decisions both on the trail and at camp.
                    If you plan on "blasting" through in less than two weeks, then you will most likely be spending more time on the trail and less time at camp. It this case your camp time may be limited to sleep thereby eliminating any need for camp comforts (other than what you need to sleep).
                    Having hiked the JMT (and many other trips) with just a no pole bivi sack, I highly recommend getting a good forecast. If it calls for thunder showers either reconsider or plan on camping low and finding shelter.

                    If you plan on a longer trip (i.e. more camp time), you may wish to go with some camp comforts including a nice bug proof, rain proof tent. Sure is nice for sitting out afternoon rains and evening bugs.

                    JD
                    Walk the Sky: Following the John Muir Trail
                    www.johndittli.com


                    --- In johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com, "o0distorted0o" <o0distorted0o@...> wrote:
                    >
                    > What type of shelter, if any, do most people use on the trail?
                    >
                    > I was thinking of bringing a 4.5lb tent... then I realized that I could cut that weight nearly in half by getting a blue tarp and a outdoor research bug bivy from REI.
                    >
                    > So what do you use?
                    >
                    > Thanks!
                    > CK
                    >
                  • John Ladd
                    I like a hooped bivy, but many people would find it claustrobhobic and you need to bring something else to protect your gear from night rains. The bivy will
                    Message 9 of 22 , Jan 5, 2011
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                      I like a hooped bivy, but many people would find it claustrobhobic and you need to bring something else to protect your gear from night rains.  The bivy will protect me and my boots from rain, but not much else, so I put my clothes in a waterproof sack on rainy nights.  I experimented with a non-hooped GoreTex bivy, but it had too much condensation.  The hoop and a more breathable fabric solved the condensation problem, at least if I follow the other steps that reduce condensation (site selection, orientation relative to wind, leaving the vents open when possible, avoiding bringing wet stuff into the bivy, etc.)

                      Mine is the Black Diamond Lightsabre, since discontinued, but similar in design to the current BD Tripod bivy at 2 lb 10 oz (my bivy with a heavier grade fabric) or Spotlight at 1 lb 2 oz. (same fabric as mine but modified design that probably has more condensation issues than my Lightsabre.)

                      While BD site no longer shows the Lightsabre, some might still be available online.

                      For the new bivies, See

                      http://www.blackdiamondequipment.com/en-us/shop/mountain/shelters/sortby/relevance/sortdir/asc/

                      Pic of a Lightsabre in difficult conditions:

                      440.jpg

                      (That's not me - I take a tent for snow conditions after trying a bivy once in the snow)

                      John Curran Ladd
                      1616 Castro Street
                      San Francisco, CA  94114-3707
                      415-648-9279


                      On Tue, Jan 4, 2011 at 2:52 PM, o0distorted0o <o0distorted0o@...> wrote:
                       

                      What type of shelter, if any, do most people use on the trail?

                      I was thinking of bringing a 4.5lb tent... then I realized that I could cut that weight nearly in half by getting a blue tarp and a outdoor research bug bivy from REI.

                      So what do you use?

                      Thanks!
                      CK


                    • Herb Stroh
                      JD s post makes a good point. Your shelter depends on your hiking style and experience. A trip anticipating short hiking days with long camp afternoons and
                      Message 10 of 22 , Jan 5, 2011
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                        JD’s post makes a good point. Your shelter depends on your hiking style and experience. A trip anticipating short hiking days with long camp afternoons and base camps may justify bigger/heavier shelters. If you are planning longer hiking days then go as light as safety and comfort will allow. But it does take some experience to know what “safety and comfort” mean to you.

                         

                        Tarps are not as convenient or plush as double-walled tents, but should not be sold short on the issue of rain protection. I used the Wild Oasis on my Wonderland hike where there was plenty of rain, and it worked well. But my hiking style is to hike most of the day with breaks to eat or enjoy the sights. I do not spend much time in camp or inside my shelter, so find this equipment choice to be a good place to save weight.

                         

                        I have also used an Outdoor Research bivy instead of the tarp. It is hard to beat the simplicity of bivy set-up: toss it on the ground, throw in your pad and bag and you are done. While I have weathered some storms in it, I agree with John L that if real weather is expected I would go with something that provides more sheltered living space.

                         

                        Herb

                         


                        From: johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com [mailto:johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of John
                        Sent: Wednesday, January 05, 2011 8:59 AM
                        To: johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com
                        Subject: [John Muir Trail] Re: JMT Shelter

                         

                         

                        As usual, lots of good and varied info. As Bob I think alluded to, it is really a matter of comfort decisions both on the trail and at camp.
                        If you plan on "blasting" through in less than two weeks, then you will most likely be spending more time on the trail and less time at camp. It this case your camp time may be limited to sleep thereby eliminating any need for camp comforts (other than what you need to sleep).
                        Having hiked the JMT (and many other trips) with just a no pole bivi sack, I highly recommend getting a good forecast. If it calls for thunder showers either reconsider or plan on camping low and finding shelter.

                        If you plan on a longer trip (i.e. more camp time), you may wish to go with some camp comforts including a nice bug proof, rain proof tent. Sure is nice for sitting out afternoon rains and evening bugs.

                        JD
                        Walk the Sky: Following the John Muir Trail
                        www.johndittli.com

                      • ed_rodriguez52@yahoo.com
                        Well said Herb, this year am planning to use my Outdoor Research bivy also. This will be my first time I use a bivy for a thru hike, am not planning to spend
                        Message 11 of 22 , Jan 5, 2011
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                          Well said Herb, this year am planning to use my Outdoor Research bivy also. This will be my first time I use a bivy for a thru hike, am not planning to spend that much time in my tent. Its all about your style and what comfort best suite you as a backpacker. It was really nice to be able to set up in a tent take care of your gear, wright in your journal. I know I would have to adjust my style when I craw into my bivy but there is something to say just be able to just roll out your sack and bed down for the night. am at a point how where 1st am looking at the weight vs the cost an example The One by Gossamer Gear and the Henry Shire's tarptent Sublite. There is about a 3oz difference between them but the cost is quite different. After I spend 25 days in my bivy I see where am at. The 2nd is the cost of the gear am looking at. Last, is the comfort like every one said is a big key to what one take with them in the back country.

                          Sent on the Sprint® Now Network from my BlackBerry®


                          From: Herb Stroh <hstroh@...>
                          Sender: johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com
                          Date: Wed, 5 Jan 2011 10:32:25 -0800
                          To: 'johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com'<johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com>
                          ReplyTo: johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com
                          Subject: RE: [John Muir Trail] Re: JMT Shelter

                           

                          JD’s post makes a good point. Your shelter depends on your hiking style and experience. A trip anticipating short hiking days with long camp afternoons and base camps may justify bigger/heavier shelters. If you are planning longer hiking days then go as light as safety and comfort will allow. But it does take some experience to know what “safety and comfort” mean to you.

                           

                          Tarps are not as convenient or plush as double-walled tents, but should not be sold short on the issue of rain protection. I used the Wild Oasis on my Wonderland hike where there was plenty of rain, and it worked well. But my hiking style is to hike most of the day with breaks to eat or enjoy the sights. I do not spend much time in camp or inside my shelter, so find this equipment choice to be a good place to save weight.

                           

                          I have also used an Outdoor Research bivy instead of the tarp. It is hard to beat the simplicity of bivy set-up: toss it on the ground, throw in your pad and bag and you are done. While I have weathered some storms in it, I agree with John L that if real weather is expected I would go with something that provides more sheltered living space.

                           

                          Herb

                           


                          From: johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com [mailto:johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of John
                          Sent: Wednesday, January 05, 2011 8:59 AM
                          To: johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com
                          Subject: [John Muir Trail] Re: JMT Shelter

                           

                           

                          As usual, lots of good and varied info. As Bob I think alluded to, it is really a matter of comfort decisions both on the trail and at camp.
                          If you plan on "blasting" through in less than two weeks, then you will most likely be spending more time on the trail and less time at camp. It this case your camp time may be limited to sleep thereby eliminating any need for camp comforts (other than what you need to sleep).
                          Having hiked the JMT (and many other trips) with just a no pole bivi sack, I highly recommend getting a good forecast. If it calls for thunder showers either reconsider or plan on camping low and finding shelter.

                          If you plan on a longer trip (i.e. more camp time), you may wish to go with some camp comforts including a nice bug proof, rain proof tent. Sure is nice for sitting out afternoon rains and evening bugs.

                          JD
                          Walk the Sky: Following the John Muir Trail
                          www.johndittli.com

                        • Amanda L Silvestri
                          I use a Six Moons Design Gatewood Cape, 11 ounces with optional bug net for only a few Ounces more and a trevex(sp) ground cloth. It has protected me well in
                          Message 12 of 22 , Jan 5, 2011
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                            I use a Six Moons Design Gatewood Cape, 11 ounces with optional bug net for only a few Ounces more and a trevex(sp) ground cloth. It has protected me well in wind, snow, rain and hail. It also keeps my pack weight low.

                            Amanda
                          • Ed Rodriguez
                            Say Amanda in the back of my mind I was thinking about what you have. It would diffidently cut on my pack weight I have a rain cover for my pack I can leave
                            Message 13 of 22 , Jan 5, 2011
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                              Say Amanda in the back of my mind I was thinking about what you have. It would diffidently cut on my pack weight I have a rain cover for my pack I can leave that. Now I look at I just look at the Six Moons Design and saw the net tent. How does the net tent fit over your cape? Thanks for sharing this.  Ed


                              From: Amanda L Silvestri <aslive@...>
                              To: johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com
                              Sent: Wed, January 5, 2011 6:17:34 PM
                              Subject: [John Muir Trail] JMT Shelter

                               

                              I use a Six Moons Design Gatewood Cape, 11 ounces with optional bug net for only a few Ounces more and a trevex(sp) ground cloth. It has protected me well in wind, snow, rain and hail. It also keeps my pack weight low.

                              Amanda


                            • Kim Fishburn
                              Minimalgear has a review of it on youtube. http://www.youtube.com/user/minimalgear#p/u/2/IxpQgM1rTz8 ________________________________ From: Ed Rodriguez
                              Message 14 of 22 , Jan 5, 2011
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                                Minimalgear has a review of it on youtube.

                                http://www.youtube.com/user/minimalgear#p/u/2/IxpQgM1rTz8



                                From: Ed Rodriguez <ed_rodriguez52@...>
                                To: johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com
                                Sent: Wed, January 5, 2011 10:30:46 PM
                                Subject: Re: [John Muir Trail] JMT Shelter

                                 

                                Say Amanda in the back of my mind I was thinking about what you have. It would diffidently cut on my pack weight I have a rain cover for my pack I can leave that. Now I look at I just look at the Six Moons Design and saw the net tent. How does the net tent fit over your cape? Thanks for sharing this.  Ed


                                From: Amanda L Silvestri <aslive@...>
                                To: johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com
                                Sent: Wed, January 5, 2011 6:17:34 PM
                                Subject: [John Muir Trail] JMT Shelter

                                 

                                I use a Six Moons Design Gatewood Cape, 11 ounces with optional bug net for only a few Ounces more and a trevex(sp) ground cloth. It has protected me well in wind, snow, rain and hail. It also keeps my pack weight low.

                                Amanda


                              • Ed Rodriguez
                                Wow Thank You soooo much for this Kim. Now I need to rethink what am taking on my next trip. For those of you who use this how durable is the cape? I have to
                                Message 15 of 22 , Jan 5, 2011
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                                  Wow Thank You soooo much for this Kim. Now I need to rethink what am taking on my next trip. For those of you who use this how durable is the cape? I have to say I think am sold on this. I see some down falls to this like when it rain water going under your cape. Guess this is one of those trade off we have to think about in your gear.


                                  From: Kim Fishburn <outhiking_55@...>
                                  To: johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com
                                  Sent: Wed, January 5, 2011 8:38:01 PM
                                  Subject: Re: [John Muir Trail] JMT Shelter

                                   

                                  Minimalgear has a review of it on youtube.

                                  http://www.youtube.com/user/minimalgear#p/u/2/IxpQgM1rTz8



                                  From: Ed Rodriguez <ed_rodriguez52@...>
                                  To: johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com
                                  Sent: Wed, January 5, 2011 10:30:46 PM
                                  Subject: Re: [John Muir Trail] JMT Shelter

                                   

                                  Say Amanda in the back of my mind I was thinking about what you have. It would diffidently cut on my pack weight I have a rain cover for my pack I can leave that. Now I look at I just look at the Six Moons Design and saw the net tent. How does the net tent fit over your cape? Thanks for sharing this.  Ed


                                  From: Amanda L Silvestri <aslive@...>
                                  To: johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com
                                  Sent: Wed, January 5, 2011 6:17:34 PM
                                  Subject: [John Muir Trail] JMT Shelter

                                   

                                  I use a Six Moons Design Gatewood Cape, 11 ounces with optional bug net for only a few Ounces more and a trevex(sp) ground cloth. It has protected me well in wind, snow, rain and hail. It also keeps my pack weight low.

                                  Amanda



                                • Roleigh Martin
                                  Here are some reviews of the cape: http://www.desertdogjournal.com/2010/10/gear-review-six-moon-designs-gatewood-cape/
                                  Message 16 of 22 , Jan 5, 2011
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                                    Here are some reviews of the cape:

                                    http://www.desertdogjournal.com/2010/10/gear-review-six-moon-designs-gatewood-cape/
                                    http://www.backpackinglight.com/cgi-bin/backpackinglight/six_moon_designs_gatewood_cape_review.html

                                    Many get the net tent for it too

                                    http://www.sixmoondesigns.com/nettents.html?page=shop.product_details&category_id=9&flypage=flypage_smd.tpl&product_id=40
                                    http://www.backpackinglight.com/cgi-bin/backpackinglight/six_moon_designs_serenity.html


                                    On Wed, Jan 5, 2011 at 10:56 PM, Ed Rodriguez <ed_rodriguez52@...> wrote:


                                    Wow Thank You soooo much for this Kim. Now I need to rethink what am taking on my next trip. For those of you who use this how durable is the cape? I have to say I think am sold on this. I see some down falls to this like when it rain water going under your cape. Guess this is one of those trade off we have to think about in your gear.


                                  • Ed Rodriguez
                                    Thanks Roleigh this was very helpful. Now am leaning more of going this way have to think of a way to keep my sleeping bag dry when it rain at night.
                                    Message 17 of 22 , Jan 5, 2011
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                                      Thanks Roleigh this was very helpful. Now am leaning more of going this way have to think of a way to keep my sleeping bag dry when it rain at night. 


                                      From: Roleigh Martin <roleigh@...>
                                      To: johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com
                                      Sent: Wed, January 5, 2011 9:34:33 PM
                                      Subject: Re: [John Muir Trail] JMT Shelter

                                       

                                      Here are some reviews of the cape:

                                      http://www.desertdogjournal.com/2010/10/gear-review-six-moon-designs-gatewood-cape/
                                      http://www.backpackinglight.com/cgi-bin/backpackinglight/six_moon_designs_gatewood_cape_review.html

                                      Many get the net tent for it too

                                      http://www.sixmoondesigns.com/nettents.html?page=shop.product_details&category_id=9&flypage=flypage_smd.tpl&product_id=40
                                      http://www.backpackinglight.com/cgi-bin/backpackinglight/six_moon_designs_serenity.html


                                      On Wed, Jan 5, 2011 at 10:56 PM, Ed Rodriguez <ed_rodriguez52@...> wrote:


                                      Wow Thank You soooo much for this Kim. Now I need to rethink what am taking on my next trip. For those of you who use this how durable is the cape? I have to say I think am sold on this. I see some down falls to this like when it rain water going under your cape. Guess this is one of those trade off we have to think about in your gear.



                                    • Don Amundson
                                      It s that time of the year again. Discussion of shelters now, backpacks and sleeping bags soon with clothing, food and first aid kits to follow. I love this
                                      Message 18 of 22 , Jan 5, 2011
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                                        It's that time of the year again.  Discussion of shelters now, backpacks and sleeping bags soon with clothing, food and first aid kits to follow. I love this stuff since it always forces me to compare, rethink and possibly make some changes in my gear. Besides I hate backpacking in the snow so I'm stuck at home for awhile. 
                                        For what it's worth--my current shelter of choice is a SMD Wild Oasis (it seems that others like it also).  It is the same size and shape as the Gatewood Cape, without the poncho capability but does have a screen skirt for bug protection. It is light at 13oz. There is plenty of room at 35 sq. ft. for me and all my gear. It sets up in minutes using one pole. I've used it in lightning storms, heavy rain, hail and extreme winds and it has protected me from the elements through it all.  The only thing that keeps me from changing is money. There is probably a cuben fiber product in my future.  For now I am completely comfortable with what I have.
                                        My previous favorite was a Tarptent Rainbow which was also a great shelter but had a weight penalty at 32 oz. At my age I'm trying to extend my backpacking life by lowering my pack weight.  In 2009 on a JMT thru hike I did OK but found myself struggling on some of the passes.  Last spring I did a 180 mile hike on the OHT with about 8lbs. less and really felt the difference.  This year on a JMT section hike, having dropped a few more pack pounds I was feeling pretty frisky.  Leaving MTR with 5 days of food and a supply of water I was carrying 25lbs.
                                        Everybody seems to have different priorities regarding their shelter. There is no right or wrong way. One persons idea of comfort or utility can be totally different for another as is obvious from the varied responses. My recommendation to you CK is that you test drive what ever shelter system you plan to use.  Go out on some done in a day trips.  See if you like what you have and if not try something else until your confident that your choice will work for an extended trip. When you finalize your choice let the rest of us know how it worked for you.  Around Jan 2012 we'll revisit this topic in earnest.



                                        From: o0distorted0o@...
                                        Date: Tue, 4 Jan 2011 22:52:33 +0000
                                        Subject: [John Muir Trail] JMT Shelter

                                         
                                        What type of shelter, if any, do most people use on the trail?

                                        I was thinking of bringing a 4.5lb tent... then I realized that I could cut that weight nearly in half by getting a blue tarp and a outdoor research bug bivy from REI.

                                        So what do you use?

                                        Thanks!
                                        CK


                                      • Amanda L Silvestri
                                        John The net tent fits inside the Gatewood Cape. The netting has a small plastic clip that connects to the top of the grommet that goes around the top of
                                        Message 19 of 22 , Jan 6, 2011
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                                          John

                                          The net "tent" fits inside the Gatewood Cape. The netting has a small plastic clip that connects to the top of the grommet that goes around the top of your center pole (trekking pole) that then holds up the netting. There are two snaps on the inside of the cape and on the outside of the netting that help prevent the netting from drooping too much, and there are tent peg loops to spread it out and hold it in place. it has a zipper door and a bathtub floor. It is just long enough for a full length sleeping bag and a few extra items like head lamp and perhaps a travel alarm. I can lie in it and read comfortably.

                                          It is very restrictive though and does not fill the entire space inside the cape, so most of your equipment will remain outside the netting but can still be sheltered inside the cape. The space behind you however is generally lost. This is not a large problem unless you are storing items there to keep them out of the rain or snow. A zippered doorway on both sides would be helpful. Of course, it may be necessary to unzip the netting from time-to-time, just a bit, to grab you water, or snack or other items that you have placed outside of the netting.

                                          If you can put up with this small inconvenience, it is a very good system. I have been toying with getting some more netting and having something made that would allow me to use the back of my shelter. I don't really sew, so that may cost me a bit. I don't think it would be too much extra weight. They have another model that has the netting sewn around the edges of the shelter and this seems to eliminate this problem. You may want to consider this option. You can see it on their WEB Site.

                                          Six Moons Designs always comes to the PCT Kick Off each year. If you can make it down there, they will have all of their shelters set up and you will be able to crawl in and out of them and talk with the designer. They are also very good about replying to e-male inquiries.

                                          I hope this information is helpful to you.

                                          Amanda
                                        • Amanda L Silvestri
                                          Ed In my experience, and I have been using the gatewood Cape for about three years now, rain is not that much of a problem. I use a ground cloth made out of
                                          Message 20 of 22 , Jan 6, 2011
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                                            Ed

                                            In my experience, and I have been using the gatewood Cape for about three years now, rain is not that much of a problem. I use a ground cloth made out of tryvex, the waterproof building material. I gather up just a few rocks and then raise up the sides of my floor, place the rocks on the outside of the raised edegs of my floor and I have a "dike". Needless to saqy, this works best on relitively flat ground.

                                            Amanda
                                          • Drewsome
                                            After hiking many week long trails around the Northwest, my buddy and I decided to try the JMT. So in 2008 we completed the trail southbound. For me, my usual
                                            Message 21 of 22 , Jan 6, 2011
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                                              After hiking many week long trails around the Northwest, my buddy and I decided to try the JMT.  So in 2008 we completed the trail southbound.  For me, my usual pack weight at the time was approx. 40#s, and so I decided I had better review my choices. I slimmed down many items for the trip, one being my choice of tents.  I ended up going with a Six Moons Design Lunar Solo and have loved it ever since.


                                              Here is a link to my website that has tons of hiking related info, and pictures from our trip.



                                              --- In johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com, "John" <shop@...> wrote:
                                              >
                                              > As usual, lots of good and varied info. As Bob I think alluded to, it is really a matter of comfort decisions both on the trail and at camp.
                                              > If you plan on "blasting" through in less than two weeks, then you will most likely be spending more time on the trail and less time at camp. It this case your camp time may be limited to sleep thereby eliminating any need for camp comforts (other than what you need to sleep).
                                              > Having hiked the JMT (and many other trips) with just a no pole bivi sack, I highly recommend getting a good forecast. If it calls for thunder showers either reconsider or plan on camping low and finding shelter.
                                              >
                                              > If you plan on a longer trip (i.e. more camp time), you may wish to go with some camp comforts including a nice bug proof, rain proof tent. Sure is nice for sitting out afternoon rains and evening bugs.
                                              >
                                              > JD
                                              > Walk the Sky: Following the John Muir Trail
                                              > www.johndittli.com
                                              >
                                              >
                                              > --- In johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com, "o0distorted0o" o0distorted0o@ wrote:
                                              > >
                                              > > What type of shelter, if any, do most people use on the trail?
                                              > >
                                              > > I was thinking of bringing a 4.5lb tent... then I realized that I could cut that weight nearly in half by getting a blue tarp and a outdoor research bug bivy from REI.
                                              > >
                                              > > So what do you use?
                                              > >
                                              > > Thanks!
                                              > > CK
                                              > >
                                              >
                                            • Ed Rodriguez
                                              Thanks Amanda, well like I said before you guys really got me thinking about this. For me with the cape I could leave my rain jacket at home plus my rain cover
                                              Message 22 of 22 , Jan 6, 2011
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                                                Thanks Amanda, well like I said before you guys really got me thinking about this. For me with the cape I could leave my rain jacket at home plus my rain cover for my backpack. Right now what everything comes down two is I have X amount of money for the JMT this year and how is the best way for me to spend it.There is allot for me to think about, thanks every one for your thoughts on this. I happen to be leave knowledge is power and the more information and people thoughts I have the better am able to chose the right gear for my style of hiking . I have learn in my later life that I don't know everything and I do need to turn to people for help.  


                                                From: Amanda L Silvestri <aslive@...>
                                                To: johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com
                                                Sent: Thu, January 6, 2011 5:29:17 AM
                                                Subject: [John Muir Trail] JMT Shelter

                                                 

                                                Ed

                                                In my experience, and I have been using the gatewood Cape for about three years now, rain is not that much of a problem. I use a ground cloth made out of tryvex, the waterproof building material. I gather up just a few rocks and then raise up the sides of my floor, place the rocks on the outside of the raised edegs of my floor and I have a "dike". Needless to saqy, this works best on relitively flat ground.

                                                Amanda


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