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Re: [John Muir Trail] Snow in the past [5 Attachments]

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  • Roleigh Martin
    Absolutely astonishing. I hope things are fine by July 21, 2011.
    Message 1 of 15 , Jan 2, 2011
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      Absolutely astonishing.  I hope things are fine by July 21, 2011.

      On Sun, Jan 2, 2011 at 10:35 PM, Kim Fishburn <outhiking_55@...> wrote:
      [Attachment(s) from Kim Fishburn included below]

      A while back I'd mentioned a few times when the snow melted really late in the season. I dug into my old pictures and found the ones with the snow. The first 4 pictures are ones I took about 1983 on the northwest border of Yosmite. There was a couple place where the snow was over 10 feet deep in the trees but for the most part it was about 3 to 5 feet deep in the trees. This was taken over the 4th of July weekend and they opened the road through Tuolumne Meadows just in time for the July 4th weekend.

      ...
    • Kim Fishburn
      I know there has been a lot of snow so far, but the forecast is for things to be much drier for the remainder of the year. ________________________________
      Message 2 of 15 , Jan 2, 2011
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        I know there has been a lot of snow so far, but the forecast is for things to be much drier for the remainder of the year.



        From: Roleigh Martin <roleigh@...>
        To: johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com
        Sent: Sun, January 2, 2011 10:45:17 PM
        Subject: Re: [John Muir Trail] Snow in the past

         

        Absolutely astonishing.  I hope things are fine by July 21, 2011.

        On Sun, Jan 2, 2011 at 10:35 PM, Kim Fishburn <outhiking_55@...> wrote:
        [Attachment(s) from Kim Fishburn included below]

        A while back I'd mentioned a few times when the snow melted really late in the season. I dug into my old pictures and found the ones with the snow. The first 4 pictures are ones I took about 1983 on the northwest border of Yosmite. There was a couple place where the snow was over 10 feet deep in the trees but for the most part it was about 3 to 5 feet deep in the trees. This was taken over the 4th of July weekend and they opened the road through Tuolumne Meadows just in time for the July 4th weekend.

        ...
      • paul.locasio
        Best method I have found to check snowpack is the CDEC site... find a location that gives daily info via satellite. Info I got from FS and NP rangers was flat
        Message 3 of 15 , Jan 3, 2011
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          Best method I have found to check snowpack is the CDEC site... find a location that gives daily info via satellite. Info I got from FS and NP rangers was flat out wrong. Over the past two summers I've been backpacking in the Eastern Sierras in early June where rangers claim there was too much snow and have kept roads closed into clear trailheads. http://cdec.water.ca.gov/cgi-progs/nearbymap?staid=RSH


          --- In johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com, Kim Fishburn <outhiking_55@...> wrote:
          >
          > I know there has been a lot of snow so far, but the forecast is for things to be
          > much drier for the remainder of the year.
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          > ________________________________
          > From: Roleigh Martin <roleigh@...>
          > To: johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com
          > Sent: Sun, January 2, 2011 10:45:17 PM
          > Subject: Re: [John Muir Trail] Snow in the past
          >
          >
          > Absolutely astonishing. I hope things are fine by July 21, 2011.
          >
          >
          > On Sun, Jan 2, 2011 at 10:35 PM, Kim Fishburn <outhiking_55@...> wrote:
          >
          > [Attachment(s) from Kim Fishburn included below]
          > >
          > >
          > >A while back I'd mentioned a few times when the snow melted really late in the
          > >season. I dug into my old pictures and found the ones with the snow. The first 4
          > >pictures are ones I took about 1983 on the northwest border of Yosmite. There
          > >was a couple place where the snow was over 10 feet deep in the trees but for the
          > >most part it was about 3 to 5 feet deep in the trees. This was taken over the
          > >4th of July weekend and they opened the road through Tuolumne Meadows just in
          > >time for the July 4th weekend.
          > >
          > >
          > >...
          >
        • Kim Fishburn
          I think it was John that mentioned carrying a whistle the other day. You can buy a replacement buckle for the sternum strap with the built in whistle here for
          Message 4 of 15 , Jan 13, 2011
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            I think it was John that mentioned carrying a whistle the other day. You can buy a replacement buckle for the sternum strap with the built in whistle here for 75 cents. They also have kits for making tarps, backpacks etc.

            http://www.questoutfitters.com/plastic.htm
          • Peter Burke
            ... funny thing - I bought some of these at REI to come back home only to realize all my packs already had them, just not in orange (Osprey and Gregory packs).
            Message 5 of 15 , Jan 13, 2011
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              On 1/13/2011 12:44 PM, Kim Fishburn wrote:
              I think it was John that mentioned carrying a whistle the other day. You can buy a replacement buckle for the sternum strap with the built in whistle here for 75 cents. They also have kits for making tarps, backpacks etc.

              http://www.questoutfitters.com/plastic.htm

              funny thing - I bought some of these at REI to come back home only to realize all my packs already had them, just not in orange (Osprey and Gregory packs). I never had noticed the odd shape of those buckles :-)




            • Barbara Karagosian
              I think neck is possibly safer than pack, since you and your neck are never parted- and if they are, it s likely too late for a whistle! Same for a Pgoton
              Message 6 of 15 , Jan 13, 2011
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                I think neck is possibly safer than pack, since you and your neck are never parted- and if they are, it's likely too late for a whistle!  Same for a Pgoton type flashlite too. 

                 Barbara

                On Jan 13, 2011, at 10:55 AM, Peter Burke <pburke@...> wrote:

                 

                On 1/13/2011 12:44 PM, Kim Fishburn wrote:

                I think it was John that mentioned carrying a whistle the other day. You can buy a replacement buckle for the sternum strap with the built in whistle here for 75 cents. They also have kits for making tarps, backpacks etc.

                http://www.questoutfitters.com/plastic.htm

                funny thing - I bought some of these at REI to come back home only to realize all my packs already had them, just not in orange (Osprey and Gregory packs). I never had noticed the odd shape of those buckles :-)




              • ed_rodriguez52@yahoo.com
                Personally I have my whistle clip on to my person I bought a camel back clip (the one s that clip on the water holes) on at REI. Sent on the Sprint® Now
                Message 7 of 15 , Jan 13, 2011
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                  Personally I have my whistle clip on to my person I bought a camel back clip (the one's that clip on the water holes) on at REI.

                  Sent on the Sprint® Now Network from my BlackBerry®


                  From: Barbara Karagosian <barbara@...>
                  Sender: johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com
                  Date: Thu, 13 Jan 2011 11:15:40 -0800
                  To: johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com<johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com>
                  ReplyTo: johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com
                  Subject: Re: [John Muir Trail] whistle

                   

                  I think neck is possibly safer than pack, since you and your neck are never parted- and if they are, it's likely too late for a whistle!  Same for a Pgoton type flashlite too. 

                   Barbara

                  On Jan 13, 2011, at 10:55 AM, Peter Burke <pburke@...> wrote:

                   

                  On 1/13/2011 12:44 PM, Kim Fishburn wrote:

                  I think it was John that mentioned carrying a whistle the other day. You can buy a replacement buckle for the sternum strap with the built in whistle here for 75 cents. They also have kits for making tarps, backpacks etc.

                  http://www.questoutfitters.com/plastic.htm

                  funny thing - I bought some of these at REI to come back home only to realize all my packs already had them, just not in orange (Osprey and Gregory packs). I never had noticed the odd shape of those buckles :-)




                • Karpani
                  I m with you here, Barbara . . . I hang mine on a thin piece of elastic, fairly close to the notch in my neck so if the whistle should get caught on anything,
                  Message 8 of 15 , Jan 13, 2011
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                    I'm with you here, Barbara . . . I hang mine on a thin piece of elastic, fairly close to the notch in my neck so if the whistle should get caught on anything, I don't strangle myself!:-)  It's very comfortable . . . hardly know it's there.
                    Karpani

                    --- On Thu, 1/13/11, Barbara Karagosian <barbara@...> wrote:

                    From: Barbara Karagosian <barbara@...>
                    Subject: Re: [John Muir Trail] whistle
                    To: "johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com" <johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com>
                    Date: Thursday, January 13, 2011, 11:15 AM

                     

                    I think neck is possibly safer than pack, since you and your neck are never parted- and if they are, it's likely too late for a whistle!  Same for a Pgoton type flashlite too. 

                     Barbara

                    On Jan 13, 2011, at 10:55 AM, Peter Burke <pburke@...> wrote:

                     

                    On 1/13/2011 12:44 PM, Kim Fishburn wrote:

                    I think it was John that mentioned carrying a whistle the other day. You can buy a replacement buckle for the sternum strap with the built in whistle here for 75 cents. They also have kits for making tarps, backpacks etc.

                    http://www.questoutfitters.com/plastic.htm

                    funny thing - I bought some of these at REI to come back home only to realize all my packs already had them, just not in orange (Osprey and Gregory packs). I never had noticed the odd shape of those buckles :-)




                  • Peter Burke
                    I was looking for some videos about Mountain Hardwear tents, and this is what I found... Many who have or will do the JMT have also been to White Mountain
                    Message 9 of 15 , Jan 13, 2011
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                      I was looking for some videos about Mountain Hardwear tents, and this
                      is what I found...

                      Many who have or will do the JMT have also been to White Mountain Peak,
                      to see the Bristlecone pines, to summit an easy 14,000er, acclimate,
                      have a grand view at the Sierras. This video covers a lot of the history
                      of the research station on that mountain, which is why we have a road up
                      to 11,000 feet and can get to the summit quickly

                      this video is about 59 minutes long, not 2:50 mins as the google page
                      indicates

                      http://video.google.com/videoplay?docid=2047786485328838547#docid=-6637271921111677914

                      "The University of California's White Mountain Research Station provides
                      science unprecedented access to unique environments, environments where
                      life exists at the edge of extremes. This award- winning documentary
                      weaves a story of how this unique access is yielding an understanding of
                      change, from physiology to climate, from the oldest known living
                      organism, to a short-lived beetle, and what this understanding means for
                      all."

                      there's a fuzzy flash version as well -
                      http://www.uctv.tv/search-details.aspx?showID=6420
                    • Don Amundson
                      You re not alone Peter. A few years ago I was intrigued by my hiking partners sternum strap whistle only to realize I had one also. As I ve lowered my pack
                      Message 10 of 15 , Jan 13, 2011
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                        You're not alone Peter.  A few years ago I was intrigued by my hiking partners sternum strap whistle only to realize I had one also.  As I've lowered my pack weight I no longer use a sternum strap so I've had to take another approach, whistle wise.



                        To: johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com
                        From: pburke@...
                        Date: Thu, 13 Jan 2011 12:55:45 -0600
                        Subject: Re: [John Muir Trail] whistle

                         
                        On 1/13/2011 12:44 PM, Kim Fishburn wrote:
                        I think it was John that mentioned carrying a whistle the other day. You can buy a replacement buckle for the sternum strap with the built in whistle here for 75 cents. They also have kits for making tarps, backpacks etc.

                        http://www.questoutfitters.com/plastic.htm

                        funny thing - I bought some of these at REI to come back home only to realize all my packs already had them, just not in orange (Osprey and Gregory packs). I never had noticed the odd shape of those buckles :-)





                      • Karpani
                        Wow!  Thanks, Peter!  This movie is really incredible.  I ve been up there among the Bristlecones a couple of times, photographing and just basically
                        Message 11 of 15 , Feb 11, 2011
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                          Wow!  Thanks, Peter!  This movie is really incredible.  I've been up there among the Bristlecones a couple of times, photographing and just basically enjoying their amazing existence.  This movie was a wonderful expansion of those experiences.  Thanks again for sharing . . . it makes a wonderful side-trip from the JMT, and a full on destination all its own:-)
                          Karpani
                          --- On Thu, 1/13/11, Peter Burke <pburke@...> wrote:

                          From: Peter Burke <pburke@...>
                          Subject: [John Muir Trail] slightly off topic - White Mountains movie
                          To: johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com
                          Date: Thursday, January 13, 2011, 1:54 PM

                           

                          I was looking for some videos about Mountain Hardwear tents, and this
                          is what I found...

                          Many who have or will do the JMT have also been to White Mountain Peak,
                          to see the Bristlecone pines, to summit an easy 14,000er, acclimate,
                          have a grand view at the Sierras. This video covers a lot of the history
                          of the research station on that mountain, which is why we have a road up
                          to 11,000 feet and can get to the summit quickly

                          this video is about 59 minutes long, not 2:50 mins as the google page
                          indicates

                          http://video.google.com/videoplay?docid=2047786485328838547#docid=-6637271921111677914

                          "The University of California's White Mountain Research Station provides
                          science unprecedented access to unique environments, environments where
                          life exists at the edge of extremes. This award- winning documentary
                          weaves a story of how this unique access is yielding an understanding of
                          change, from physiology to climate, from the oldest known living
                          organism, to a short-lived beetle, and what this understanding means for
                          all."

                          there's a fuzzy flash version as well -
                          http://www.uctv.tv/search-details.aspx?showID=6420

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