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snowshoes

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  • ned@mountaineducation.org
    Seems to me that, new for this year (or next?), will be the addition of tails and better bindings and heel lifts, so see if this is true. We used the 25-inch
    Message 1 of 1 , Nov 20, 2010
      Seems to me that, new for this year (or next?), will be the addition of tails and better bindings and heel lifts, so see if this is true.
       
      We used the 25-inch versions on the Spring trip, but that was on typical spring consolidated snow. For powder snow, the 25s should be plenty as long as the user is of average build and pack weight. If I had the opportunity to buy one size for all-winter use, the 25s would be it.
       
      The main reasons why we like the Lightning Ascents so much has to do with
      - the way the decking attaches to the frame rather than wrap around it (less abrasion on the decking over the frame by ice and crusty snow and subsequent snowshoe failure--happened to me after only 100 miles on the JMT)
      - the heel lifts
      - good binding design, and most importantly
      - multiple metal rails beneath the foot for ice traction and traverse (side slope) hold. If snowshoeing in powder or loose spring slush, toe-down descents can be a bit of a ride, but this is true of any snowshoe.
       
       

      "Just remember, Be Careful out there!"
       
      Ned Tibbits, Director
      Mountain Education
      1106A Ski Run Blvd
      South Lake Tahoe, Ca. 96150
          P: 888-996-8333
          F: 530-541-1456
          C: 530-721-1551
          http://www.mountaineducation.org
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