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Garmin Rinos?

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  • manfred_kopisch
    Ned, I m interested in your experience with the Rinos. Did you use them with the reachargable battery packs they come with? Those last roughly 25 hours. So I
    Message 1 of 9 , Nov 4, 2010
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      Ned,

      I'm interested in your experience with the Rinos. Did you use them with the reachargable battery packs they come with? Those last roughly 25 hours. So I would wonder how you recharged them on the trail. They can unfortunately not be reacharged via USB. Or did you get the AA battery cover with four AA batteries? That way you could recharge AA batteries on the trail. The disadvantage would be that the radio transmits with only 0.5 W when using AA batteries compared to 5 W with the battery pack.

      We have in our family three Garmin Rino 530 HCx and use them frequently to let our younger kids go into the woods geocaching "on a long leash". They can talk to us when they need to and we can see their position on our display when we didn't hear from them for a while.

      While the Rinos add weight to the pack, I could imagine bringing them next year on the JMT if the people who right now say they want to come along really do so. We might hike at different speeds and the faster hikers could hike ahead and start fishing for dinner, while the slower hikers go at their own speed without pressure. With the Garmins everyone could stay in contact and see how far away from each other they are.

      Thanks,

      Manfred

      --- In johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com, <ned@...> wrote:
      >
      > Roleigh,
      >
      > This past Spring we used the Garmin Rinos as both GPS and two-way radios to keep us all together and informed of route changes ahead for those in the back of the pack. Worked great and never had a problem with obstacles, though we were never on opposite sides of a ridge.
      >
      > For longer reliable communications, we carried an Iridium Satellite phone which allowed us to call the Inyo Sheriff and request two separate helicopter evacs from along the trail.
      >
      > Considering using a hand-held Ham for the next trip.
      >
      >
      >
      > "Just remember, Be Careful out there!"
      >
      > Ned Tibbits, Director
      > Mountain Education
      > 1106A Ski Run Blvd
      > South Lake Tahoe, Ca. 96150
      > P: 888-996-8333
      > F: 530-541-1456
      > C: 530-721-1551
      > http://www.mountaineducation.org
    • John
      Yikes! Flagging tape! There is no need for this awful stuff in the backcountry even if it is biodegradable . It is unsightly and illegal to leave (unless
      Message 2 of 9 , Nov 5, 2010
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        Yikes! Flagging tape! There is no need for this awful stuff in the backcountry even if it is "biodegradable". It is unsightly and illegal to leave (unless being used for administrative purposes by the managing agency).

        If every group left flagging at trail junctions the sign posts would look like Maypoles!

        The only reason for ever leaving notes is in emergencies. When traveling in groups it is the leaders responsibility to assure everyone knows where the're going, if they don't they need to be with somebody that does.

        This means waiting at trail junctions/camp departures if need be, this is one of the requirements of group travel.

        JD
        Walk the Sky: Following the John Muir Trail
        www.johndittli.com


        --- In johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com, Roleigh Martin <roleigh@...> wrote:
        >
        > Excellent idea, John.
        >
        > Nancy, most of the neon flags you see are put on or by the trail by work
        > crews. I talked to some work crew leaders this summer and it's how they
        > flag what areas of the trail need working.
        >
        > Sure, some of the neon flags get left behind like you bemoan. In the 5-6
        > years we've used the technique, only once did a neon flag not get picked up
        > by the trailing hiker. John's idea is excellent.
        >
        > You can buy biodegradeable neon flagging tape which I recommend plus, going
        > one more step, if you have some preprinted mailing address labels, such as
        > "please destroy or pack out if found after _________". When something only
        > weighs 1/20th of an ounce, it isn't that much of a burden for someone to
        > pick up and pack until a fire can be made.
        >
        > The purpose of neon flags typically is to let the trailing hiker know where
        > the lead hiker turned on a confusing junction or hiked tangent-wise to the
        > trail for a camp site when the camp site is not easily seen from the trail.
        > It's easy for a group to get broken up if not used. Or for someone to take
        > a wrong turn.
        >
        > But I bet what you're seeing is work crew neon flags. I saw more of them
        > for that reason on the trail than hiker use.
        >
        > Roleigh
        >
        > On Thu, Nov 4, 2010 at 8:47 PM, John Ladd <johnladd@...> wrote:
        >
        > >
        > >
        > > I leave messages on trails but always put a "please destroy by" date on
        > > them. something like:
        > >
        > > Message for Joe on July 5, 2010. Please destroy if found after July 10.
        > >
        > > I think that pretty well takes care of the problem. I agree that leaving
        > > notes without "destroy by" dates is a bad idea.
        > >
        > > John Curran Ladd
        > > 1616 Castro Street
        > > San Francisco, CA 94114-3707
        > > 415-648-9279
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > > On Thu, Nov 4, 2010 at 5:54 PM, snkworth <snkworth@...> wrote:
        > >
        > >>
        > >>
        > >> With all due respect regarding the recent mention of leaving neon flagging
        > >> with messages on the trail. We came upon this multiple times on our JMT hike
        > >> this past summer. At first we thought it was something 'official' that we
        > >> needed to heed and later considered it annoying litter and a distraction
        > >> along the trail.
        > >>
        > >> How can you be certain that the "following" person sees the flagging and
        > >> removes it? And what about everyone else that could, perhaps, be annoyed by
        > >> the messaging. Also, it certainly goes against the "leave no trace"
        > >> philosophy.
        > >>
        > >> If there is something that important that must be communicated, could not
        > >> the lead person wait for the following person for said message?
        > >>
        > >> Thank you for your consideration to this issue. And I'm very pleased to
        > >> learn that you are considering radios for your necessary communications.
        > >>
        > >> Nancy from Mt. Shasta
        > >>
        > >
        > >
        > >
        >
      • John Ladd
        An alternate to Neon flagging is to pre-print some florescent labels with something like Trail note from John Ladd for _______________. Please destroy after
        Message 3 of 9 , Nov 5, 2010
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          An alternate to Neon flagging is to pre-print some florescent labels with something like "Trail note from John Ladd for _______________. Please destroy after Aug __ 2011".  When you need to leave a trail note, tear off a sheet of Rite in the Rain paper, attach the label and write your note (I tend to use a pencil for reliability).  Put it next to the trail with a flat rock to secure it (but not obscuring the label).  I've been using this method for a while, and I don't recall an instance when my intended recipient didn't see it and pick it up.  The color tends to catch your eye.

          florescent lables.gifRite in the Rain Pad.gif

          The labels are probably pretty biodegradale.  The Rite in the Rain paper admittedly less so.

          I also leave information for other hikers generally, trying to supply useful information that won't appear on a map or datapoint list.  Things like:

          Off-PCT lake one mile South of this junction was swimmable temp August 2 and had fish.

          Log 200 feet south of trail is an easy stream crossing.

          Turn right here for easiest ford to Blaney Hot Springs. Once you cross, angle to your right over small ridge.

          Next water source to the South is at least six miles. Source shown in Databook one mile So from here was dry on Aug 3.

          Even: Don't miss the meteor shower peaking Aug 11.  Highest concentration in SE and peaking at 11 pm

          Of course, notes like the next-to-last one are most often useful to people headed in the opposite direction as your route.  SoBo hikers can leave notes helping NoBo hikers.  If you want to pass information to SoBo people, you could ask the next NoBo hiker you see to carry your note North and leave it at a place where it will help the SoBo people.

          John Curran Ladd
          1616 Castro Street
          San Francisco, CA  94114-3707
          415-648-9279


          On Thu, Nov 4, 2010 at 9:24 PM, Roleigh Martin <roleigh@...> wrote:
           

          Excellent idea, John. 

          Nancy, most of the neon flags you see are put on or by the trail by work crews.  I talked to some work crew leaders this summer and it's how they flag what areas of the trail need working.

          Sure, some of the neon flags get left behind like you bemoan.  In the 5-6 years we've used the technique, only once did a neon flag not get picked up by the trailing hiker.  John's idea is excellent. 


        • Roleigh Martin
          John, I agree the tapes should not be left behind by the trailing hiker. I agree they should only be used in emergency situations (but my understanding of the
          Message 4 of 9 , Nov 5, 2010
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            John, I agree the tapes should not be left behind by the trailing hiker.  I agree they should only be used in emergency situations (but my understanding of the word "emergency" is to communicate information that keeps the group together.  A group that gets split up by either taking a wrong direction or going past other members camped off the side but not visible, to me, that group creates an unwarranted safety hazard.  For if that group intends to reassemble, it's hard to do without communicating.
             
            I still think there is little need to make a lot of fuss about this.  In my own experience of 11 years hiking each summer in the High Sierra, only once, have we been unable to pick up a left-behind flag.
             
            Your idea that the flag-putter should stay there and communicate behind is not always a safe idea.  In our groups, the slow hikers will hit the trail about 90 minutes ahead of the fast hikers, and the fast hikers will pass the slow hikers later on.  If the message about a confusing junction is left behind in those first 90 minutes and the slow hiker stays behind to communicate the message, then that slow hiker will not be able to make the day's goal, putting the group at risk. 
             
            To minimize the problem one neon flag per ten year poses, the idea of a "destroy by date" and using "biodegradeable neon flagging tape" helps reduce the problem even moreso.
             
            On Fri, Nov 5, 2010 at 10:42 AM, John <shop@...> wrote:
             

            Yikes! Flagging tape! There is no need for this awful stuff in the backcountry even if it is "biodegradable". It is unsightly and illegal to leave (unless being used for administrative purposes by the managing agency).

            If every group left flagging at trail junctions the sign posts would look like Maypoles!

            The only reason for ever leaving notes is in emergencies. When traveling in groups it is the leaders responsibility to assure everyone knows where the're going, if they don't they need to be with somebody that does.

            This means waiting at trail junctions/camp departures if need be, this is one of the requirements of group travel.

            JD
            Walk the Sky: Following the John Muir Trail
            www.johndittli.com


             
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