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Re: [John Muir Trail] Frogs

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  • Kim Fishburn
    in 89 I stopped next to a pond near Virginia Lake and there were thousands of tadpoles in it. There was barely enough room for them, and nothing else.
    Message 1 of 11 , Oct 3, 2010
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      in 89 I stopped next to a pond near Virginia Lake and there were thousands of tadpoles in it. There was barely enough room for them, and nothing else.



      From: Amanda L Silvestri <aslive@...>
      To: johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com
      Sent: Sun, October 3, 2010 9:33:19 PM
      Subject: [John Muir Trail] Frogs

       

      This past July, while descending from Silver Pass, I was serenaded by a chorus
      of frogs as I passed an unnamed lake just north east of Silver Pass Lake at
      about 10, 400 feet. There must have hundreds of them.  The trail was too far
      from the lake for me to see the frogs, but they were very loud.  Can I safely
      assume that these were the Yellow Legged Frogs?  Are there other kinds of frogs
      up there?

      Amanda

    • John
      Amanda As I understand it (per Roland), MYF make an inaudible call , that can only be heard by holding a device to the water (or by other MY frogs). You were
      Message 2 of 11 , Oct 3, 2010
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        Amanda

        As I understand it (per Roland), MYF make an inaudible "call", that can only be heard by holding a device to the water (or by other MY frogs). You were probably hearing Pacific? Tree Frogs. The third common "frog" is the Yosemite Toad.

        JD
        Walk the Sky: Following the John Muir Trail
        www.johndittli.com


        --- In johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com, Amanda L Silvestri <aslive@...> wrote:
        >
        > This past July, while descending from Silver Pass, I was serenaded by a chorus
        > of frogs as I passed an unnamed lake just north east of Silver Pass Lake at
        > about 10, 400 feet. There must have hundreds of them.  The trail was too far
        > from the lake for me to see the frogs, but they were very loud.  Can I safely
        > assume that these were the Yellow Legged Frogs?  Are there other kinds of frogs
        > up there?
        >
        > Amanda
        >
      • jnwiley
        Toiling to Save a Threatened Frog article appeared in yesterday s New York Times! SEQUOIA AND KINGS CANYON NATIONAL PARKS, Calif. — From the summit of
        Message 3 of 11 , Oct 6, 2010
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          "Toiling to Save a Threatened Frog" article appeared in yesterday's New York Times!

          SEQUOIA AND KINGS CANYON NATIONAL PARKS, Calif. — From the summit of Bishop Pass in the Sierra Nevada, elevation 11,972 feet, all you can see are miles of granite peaks against the sky. There is no traffic and no pollution. The natural world seems pure and unspoiled.

          But appearances are deceiving. Over the last decade, disaster has struck in the form of chytridiomycosis, or chytrid, a deadly fungal disease that has driven at least 200 of the world's 6,700 amphibian species to extinction. One third of the world's frogs, toads and salamanders are threatened. Forty percent are declining. Chytrid's arrival has laid waste to the indigenous Sierra Nevada yellow-legged frog, Rana sierrae.

          http://www.nytimes.com/2010/10/05/science/05frog.html

          Great article, except this is a stretch:
          "When he was in graduate school, he would often leave Berkeley after work, drive to a 10,000-foot-elevation trailhead, hike 16 miles to a research site carrying 80 pounds of equipment and set up camp before calling it a day."

          More on his website:
          http://web.me.com/vancevredenburg/Vances_site/News.html

          - Jim
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