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32368Re: [John Muir Trail] Fire restrictions and permits required for stoves on the JMT

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  • Roleigh Martin
    Jun 29, 2013
    Thanks for the precise information, Ralph!  Does all of what you describe (other than the fuel) come with the kit?  Mine is on the way via REI/UPS.

    Also, you mention a cozy/holder -- does that make this redundant and not needed?  We'll only be using the stove to boil water to put into our meals in boiling-water safe plastic bags (see attached, my favorite), and then letting them steep for for 10 minutes in a cozy like this (unless it is redundant to what comes with the product):


    The two attachments show (a) the solar heating cooking bag specs I have and (b) the clear water cooking bag specs.  This year, I'm going with (a) because I have so many of these bags (I had to buy a minimum of 1000 bags and if we run out of fuel, we can just heat with the sun, that way we won't have to bring excess fuel.  I'm counting on Jetboil being efficient enough we can get by with one canister for two people for 8 days.

    -------------------------------------------------
    Visit my Google Profile (lots of very interesting research links)
    _



    On Sat, Jun 29, 2013 at 4:05 PM, straw_marmot <no_reply@yahoogroups.com> wrote:
     

    I have the Jetboil Sol Ti. Efficient and well made piece of kit, I love it.

    Real weight is exactly 9.0 oz. This is the stove, the Ti cup with integrated flux ring and neoprene insulating cozy/holder, and the lid. You do want the lid, that's the extra little bit of weight. You don't need the stabilizer, it's plenty stable.

    Add 7.1 oz for the filled weight of the smallest fuel canister, containing 3.5oz (100g) of fuel. Canisters are a totally standard item, you will find them everywhere. Fuel efficiency is incredible. I'd say the quoted figure is conservative, if anything. Compared to most other stoves, factor in a significant weight saving in fuel. And bear in mind the importance of this if boiling is a backup water purification method - you get the necessary 1 minute rolling boil with far less fuel in this system, boiling enough water to drink for a couple of days is a practical backup method.

    Because the heat transfer is so efficient, you can only safely boil water in the cup. Even something like soup is dangerous. Experiment at your own risk - that flux ring WILL reach thousands of degrees and melt very fast if there isn't water in the cup to convect the heat away fast enough. But you can still cook most things by just letting them sit in boiled water in the insulated cup for a bit longer than you might otherwise simmer. More fuel efficient way to do things this way in any case.

    Highly recommended by me too.



    --- In johnmuirtrail@yahoogroups.com, Roleigh Martin <roleigh@...> wrote:
    >
    > Please see the attached extra information I was able to gather. It is a
    > collection of email inquiries and responses. What is not shown are the
    > email addresses of all the authorities I reached out to, so only who
    > responded is shown.
    >
    > In it you'll see John Ladd's take, I am presuming his interpretation is
    > correct. For this year I'm not taking an alcohol stove consequently.
    > Actually if I was hiking solo I'd go stoveless again like I did last year,
    > just getting by with a solar heating water bag warm-up cooking solution.
    > But this year a lady friend of mine is doing the hike with us and I don't
    > want to immediately hate the experience going stoveless. Going stoveless
    > takes a special type of gut and very few thru hikers have acquired that gut.
    >
    > Consequently I went with the "highly recommended" Jetboil Sol Ti Cooking
    > System which weighs 8.5 oz. I presume that does not include the weight of
    > the fuel.
    >
    > http://shop.jetboil.com/index.php/sol-cooking-ti.html
    >
    > It says "* System weight does not include pot support, fuel stabilizer and
    > measuring cup." I'm not sure if the pot support and fuel stabilizer are
    > shown in the picture or are needed on the trek.
    >
    > Is Jetboil's claim that Water Boiled 12 Liters per 100g Jetpower canister
    >
    > the case in practice?
    >
    > Care to comment on this stove?
    >
    > Were you able to get the 100g fuel (or equivalent brand but same size) at
    > each of the supply stops (Yosemite Valley (start), TM, RM, MTR)?
    >
    > -------------------------------------------------
    > Visit my Google Profile (lots of very interesting research
    > links)<https://plus.google.com/104440166440169700478/about>
    > _

    >
    >
    >
    > On Sat, Jun 29, 2013 at 2:28 PM, Roleigh Martin <roleigh@...> wrote:
    >
    > > I saw that posting via the same link given at the JMT Facebook page. I've
    > > been reaching out to individuals more in the know than me to get expanded
    > > information on it. I will be posting it this weekend.
    > >
    > > I am particularly concerned about the use of alcohol stoves being legit
    > > under this tightened rule.
    > >
    > >
    > > -------------------------------------------------
    > > Visit my Google Profile (lots of very interesting research links)<https://plus.google.com/104440166440169700478/about>
    > > _
    > >
    > >
    > >
    > > On Sat, Jun 29, 2013 at 2:26 PM, dr.suuz_2013 <sbadvm@...> wrote:
    > >
    > >> **

    > >>
    > >>
    > >> Information about the campfire ban on the PCT south of Yosemite is posted
    > >> on the PCT Association's website:
    > >> http://www.pcta.org/2013/campfires-banned-on-southern-pct-12941/ .
    > >>
    > >> They state that, "Controlled flame devices such as portable stoves
    > >> fueled by petroleum or LPG products are allowed by permit." Does anyone
    > >> know what type of permit is required and where to obtain it? Does each
    > >> member of a hiking group using a stove need to have a separate permit?
    > >>
    > >>
    > >>
    > >
    > >
    >


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