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Re: Gravity's Rainbow (was: No Subject)

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  • Mal McCormack
    ... Now, to my mind that gets a bit more nearer the mark, but there s still an unsatisfying sensation of incompleteness. ... Hmm. I once asked Barth very
    Message 1 of 11 , Jan 20, 2001
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      --- In johnbarth@egroups.com, scott wilkerson <kalyx00@y...> wrote:
      >
      >There exists a vast speculative literature on Pynchon's identity.
      >Indeed, in the 70s and 80, certain groups propagated the idea that
      >"he" was no person at all, but a colloquium of Ameican novelists,
      >including Barth.

      Now, to my mind that gets a bit more nearer the mark, but there's
      still an unsatisfying sensation of incompleteness.

      > As for Barth, he has his own sweet mystery in the rumor that he was
      >once a CIA operative. Critic Don Noble once approached Barth on
      >this question and while Barth was comically elusive and turned in a
      >great disquisition on Sabbatical and Tidewater, he did not finally
      >answer question, that is, he neither confirmed nor denied.

      Hmm. I once asked Barth very directly if he was Luke Rhinehart,
      author of "The Diceman" (1971). I didn't get a straight answer to
      that one, either.
    • Kris Majer
      ... he was no person at all, but a colloquium of Ameican novelists, including Barth. What s this about Pynchon being a group of writers? Sounds crazy enough
      Message 2 of 11 , Jan 21, 2001
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        > Indeed, in the 70s and 80, certain groups propagated the idea that
        "he" was no person at all, but a colloquium of Ameican novelists,
        including Barth.

        What's this about Pynchon being a group of writers? Sounds crazy
        enough to actually be true. Any sources (articles, etc. - preferably
        available from the net) on the subject? Much as I read and heard of
        Pynchon, that one piece of information never surfaced, and it is
        quite stimulating. Reminds me of Philip K. Dick and what he said
        about Stanisław Lem, Poland's best sci-fi writer - that LEM is an
        acronym for a secret subversive organisation, not a person. The
        difference being, of course, that Lem (if it is him, and not some
        Billy Shears-like deadringer or simply someone else) is available for
        viewing anytime, active and eagerly answering questions concerning
        his art. Perhaps too eagerly, even. But that's no matter.

        Anyway, interesting stuff. So long, amigos.
      • Mal McCormack
        Stanilaw Lem, yes. Solaris is a great story. The movie wasn t bad either.
        Message 3 of 11 , Jan 23, 2001
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          Stanilaw Lem, yes.
          "Solaris" is a great story. The movie wasn't bad either.
        • Mal McCormack
          ... *Stanislaw* Forgive my typo, Kris. It s late at night . . .
          Message 4 of 11 , Jan 23, 2001
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            --- In johnbarth@egroups.com, "Mal McCormack" <annemac@a...> wrote:
            >
            > Stanilaw Lem, yes.
            > "Solaris" is a great story. The movie wasn't bad either.

            *Stanislaw*
            Forgive my typo, Kris. It's late at night . . .
          • Kris Majer
            ... The book is good indeed, though I have to say that the original Polish version suffers a lot from stylistic trouble. What I m about to reveal here is that
            Message 5 of 11 , Jan 23, 2001
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              > "Solaris" is a great story. The movie wasn't bad either.

              The book is good indeed, though I have to say that the original
              Polish version suffers a lot from stylistic trouble. What I'm about
              to reveal here is that Lem is perhaps not the greatest stylist - I
              don't know how that comes across in translation (I am obsessed with
              translation, by the way - hoping it will eventually be my primary
              occupation). Anyhow, he has some great ideas and good stories to tell
              and that's a lot already. Haven't seen the picture, but since it's
              Tarkowski, I can imagine it being exceptional. As far as I know, Lem
              disowned the film altogether or something like that - didn't like it,
              that's for sure. Which doesn't prevent the film from being good,
              obviously (ditto Forman's "Cuckoo's Nest"). As for typo, didn't see
              it the first time anyway.

              Barth-note: working on a translation of "Click" again. Started it
              about half a year ago, so when I got back to it, it needed a whole
              lot of polishing and rephrasing. The dictionary bit is the hardest
              part, I mean the dictionary bit in the story, when the idea of
              hypertexted words is explained. Another problem (one of literally
              hundreds!) is whether the title should be a noun (the sound of
              clicking) or an imperative ("Click!"): unfortunately the two cannot
              blend into one in Polish. I will have to choose either: so far I've
              been more or less defending the imperative, as the words on screen
              encourage/invite the characters to click on them.

              Wonder what I'll do with it when/if it's finished. Can't print it
              anywhere, except a few copies for my friends (who have been waiting
              patiently and can't enjoy the original due to language barriers), for
              obvious reasons. Do you think obtaining the copyright would be a very
              difficult business?

              Well, I'd better finish it first. Hopefully, in a few weeks' time, in
              between Giles. Ah! The agony of waiting.

              K.
            • Mark Brawner
              ... occupation). I recently corresponded with a translator, Doug Robinson (University of Mississippi), who is also a Barth enthusiast. He did a study of
              Message 6 of 11 , Jan 23, 2001
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                >(I am obsessed with translation, by the way - hoping it will eventually be
                >my primary
                occupation).

                I recently corresponded with a translator, Doug Robinson (University of
                Mississippi), who is also a Barth enthusiast. He did a study of "Giles
                Goat-Boy," and Barth figures in his book "American Apocalypses". Take a
                look at his site; you may want to talk shop.

                http://members.tripod.com/douglas.robinson/index.htm

                -Mark
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