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Re: "Two Meditations"

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  • william.street42
    I think that Lake Erie is not so much about pollution, but about knowlege coming only after the disaster. In other words, we commit the an action with good
    Message 1 of 3 , Sep 16, 2008
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      I think that "Lake Erie" is not so much about pollution, but about
      knowlege coming only after the disaster. In other words, we commit the
      an action with good intentions,only realizing afterward that it has
      disastrous consequnces. Oedipus has been one of Barth's central
      emblems for this idea: Oedipus thought he was doing something good in
      seeking to find out who he was, only to learn that knowledge of who he
      was had horrifying consequences for him. "Lake Erie" moves in a few
      sentences from polluted Lake Erie to Oedipus.

      When it comes to pollution, you might look up what happened in
      Cleveland where the Cuyahoga River meets Lake Erie in the late
      sixties. I think the piece's frist sentence references that.

      Bill Street



      --- In johnbarth@yahoogroups.com, "nicola_leporini"
      <nicola_leporini@...> wrote:
      >
      > Hello to everybody.
      >
      > I've read somewhere that the short-story "Two Meditations" from Lost
      > in the Funhouse is basically about the repetition of situations (while
      > "Glossolalia" is about the repetition of styles and of a metric
      pattern).
      >
      > The first fragment is about Chaos Theory, or "the straw that broke the
      > camel's back".
      > But what about the second one? I've read that it is about "the belief
      > that pollution leads to knowledge"... But what does it mean?
      >
      > Thank you very much
      > N.
      >
    • Nicola Leporini
      Thank you very much Bill, Now it is very clear! N. ... From: william.street42 Subject: [johnbarth] Re: Two Meditations To:
      Message 2 of 3 , Sep 17, 2008
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        Thank you very much Bill,
        Now it is very clear!
        N.

        --- On Tue, 16/9/08, william.street42 <william.street@...> wrote:
        From: william.street42 <william.street@...>
        Subject: [johnbarth] Re: "Two Meditations"
        To: johnbarth@yahoogroups.com
        Date: Tuesday, 16 September, 2008, 4:18 PM

        I think that "Lake Erie" is not so much about pollution, but about
        knowlege coming only after the disaster. In other words, we commit the
        an action with good intentions,only realizing afterward that it has
        disastrous consequnces. Oedipus has been one of Barth's central
        emblems for this idea: Oedipus thought he was doing something good in
        seeking to find out who he was, only to learn that knowledge of who he
        was had horrifying consequences for him. "Lake Erie" moves in a few
        sentences from polluted Lake Erie to Oedipus.

        When it comes to pollution, you might look up what happened in
        Cleveland where the Cuyahoga River meets Lake Erie in the late
        sixties. I think the piece's frist sentence references that.

        Bill Street

        --- In johnbarth@yahoogrou ps.com, "nicola_leporini"
        <nicola_leporini@ ...> wrote:
        >
        > Hello to everybody.
        >
        > I've read somewhere that the short-story "Two Meditations" from Lost
        > in the Funhouse is basically about the repetition of situations (while
        > "Glossolalia" is about the repetition of styles and of a metric
        pattern).
        >
        > The first fragment is about Chaos Theory, or "the straw that broke the
        > camel's back".
        > But what about the second one? I've read that it is about "the belief
        > that pollution leads to knowledge".. . But what does it mean?
        >
        > Thank you very much
        > N.
        >


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