Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

wait for response

Expand Messages
  • Elena Tarnarutskaya
    Hi I m a new person in your group. I ve started research on Chimera and I think the book is really outstanding. I m over 40, I live in Russia and teach
    Message 1 of 23 , Jan 23, 2007
    • 0 Attachment
      Hi
      I'm a new person in your group. I've started research on "Chimera" and I think the book is really outstanding. I'm over 40, I live in Russia and teach English to law students. If you, I mean some of you, or one of you could write why you're here in this group, what you 're doing and we could share our ideas, it would be great - and I'd be grateful!
      Elena 


      It's here! Your new message!
      Get new email alerts with the free Yahoo! Toolbar.
    • Mark Brawner
      ... Welcome Elena. I started this group some years ago just out of a love for the man s books and the desire to talk about them. We used to be much more
      Message 2 of 23 , Jan 23, 2007
      • 0 Attachment
        On 1/23/07, Elena Tarnarutskaya <etarnarutskaya@...> wrote:
        > Hi
        > I'm a new person in your group. I've started research on "Chimera" and I think the book is really outstanding. I'm over 40, I live in Russia and teach English to law students. If you, I mean some of you, or one of you could write why you're here in this group, what you 're doing and we could share our ideas, it would be great - and I'd be grateful!

        Welcome Elena. I started this group some years ago just out of a love
        for the man's books and the desire to talk about them. We used to be
        much more active. We've had groups readings before (of 'LETTERS' and
        'The Tidewater Tales,' for example, which now strikes me in hindsight
        as pleasingly ambitious) and periods with a lot of general chitchat
        about books, both Barth-written and otherwise. We're now rather
        dormant, not to say moribund. Could spring alive at any moment.

        So is Chimera your firth Barth book?

        Regards,
        Mark
      • Mark Brawner
        ... I seem to have developed a lithp...
        Message 3 of 23 , Jan 23, 2007
        • 0 Attachment
          On 1/23/07, Mark Brawner <mark.brawner@...> wrote:
          > So is Chimera your firth Barth book?

          I seem to have developed a lithp...
        • M. Sedaghat Payam
          Hi Elena I am from Iran and I teach literature at the University. I have recently translated Chimera s first story, Dunyazadiad, into Persian and it will be
          Message 4 of 23 , Jan 23, 2007
          • 0 Attachment
            Hi Elena
            I am from Iran and I teach literature at the University. I have recently translated Chimera's first story, Dunyazadiad, into Persian and it will be published soon. It is one Barth's finest works. However at the moment my favourite is Giles Goat-boy. As Mark already stated we are all here to talk about Barth and here I take this opportunity to thank Mark for his group. In general Yahoo Groups were much more active a few years ago and now almost all of them are experiencing a period of inactivity.
            Anyway what novella did you like more in Chimera and what are your other favorite writers?

            Regards
            Mehdy

            Elena Tarnarutskaya <etarnarutskaya@...> wrote:
            Hi
            I'm a new person in your group. I've started research on "Chimera" and I think the book is really outstanding. I'm over 40, I live in Russia and teach English to law students. If you, I mean some of you, or one of you could write why you're here in this group, what you 're doing and we could share our ideas, it would be great - and I'd be grateful!
            Elena 

            It's here! Your new message!
            Get new email alerts with the free Yahoo! Toolbar.


            Bored stiff? Loosen up...
            Download and play hundreds of games for free on Yahoo! Games.

          • Mal McCormack
            ... on Chimera and I think the book is really outstanding. I m over 40, I live in Russia and teach English to law students. If you, I mean some of you, or
            Message 5 of 23 , Jan 24, 2007
            • 0 Attachment
              --- In johnbarth@yahoogroups.com, Elena Tarnarutskaya
              <etarnarutskaya@...> wrote:
              >
              > Hi
              > I'm a new person in your group. I've started research
              on "Chimera" and I think the book is really outstanding. I'm over
              40, I live in Russia and teach English to law students. If you, I
              mean some of you, or one of you could write why you're here in this
              group, what you 're doing and we could share our ideas, it would be
              great - and I'd be grateful!
              > Elena


              Welcome, Elena.

              Well, I've been an diehard Barth fan for about 40 years. (I
              discovered Pynchon somewhat later and he also vies for my literary
              affections, it's a close call.)

              It must have been about 1968 when, bored with Wilbur Smith and the
              like, I picked up "The Sot-Weed Factor". It was paperback, not
              really cheap, but the cover design attracted me and the first
              sentence totally hooked me. Moreover, the story was BIG!!

              Been hooked ever since, though some of his work I wouldn't read more
              than once (well, twice at a push). I like the biggies much more
              than the novellas, but that's just a personal idiosyncrasy. For my
              money, "LETTERS" is the pinnacle (though seriously challenged by
              Pynchon's "Mason & Dixon).

              Mark and I met through a previous Barth group and he started this
              one when that one became more or less moribund. We're all friends
              here, no flame wars to date, not like some other groups I could
              think of...

              I'm fascinated that Barth is now being translated in so many
              languages. I'd really love to know how he's appreciated (or not) in
              these different cultures. But then, I suspect that deep down people
              are pretty much the same all the world over.

              Mal.
            • M. Sedaghat Payam
              Mal McCormack wrote: I m fascinated that Barth is now being translated in so many languages. I d really love to know how he s appreciated
              Message 6 of 23 , Jan 24, 2007
              • 0 Attachment


                Mal McCormack <malmc_y@...> wrote: 
                I'm fascinated that Barth is now being translated in so many
                languages. I'd really love to know how he's appreciated (or not) in
                these different cultures. But then, I suspect that deep down people
                are pretty much the same all the world over.
                 
                 
                I am very interested to know what will be the feedback of Iranian audience toward Barth. I have actually included Lost in Funhouse and Life-story in addition to Dunyazadiad in the collection which will be published in a couple of month. It is the first time that anything by Barth is going to be published in Iran and I hope later other translators publish his bulky novels such as Giles and Sot-weed.


                It's here! Your new message!
                Get new email alerts with the free Yahoo! Toolbar.
              • agrimorfee
                It takes a friendly call across the water to make a blip in this forum! I got into Barth by pure chance, browsing in the library where I found Tidewater Tales.
                Message 7 of 23 , Jan 26, 2007
                • 0 Attachment
                  It takes a friendly call across the water to make a blip in this
                  forum! I got into Barth by pure chance, browsing in the library where
                  I found Tidewater Tales. I'm a sucker for irregular chapter headings
                  and wacky typefonts in a novel...:)

                  I've followed him ever since, but have been mostly half-hearted to
                  disenchanted with his work since the 1990s. Favorite work? LETTERS.

                  I would be very intrigued with the Iranian response to Somebody The
                  Sailor later on, too.
                • M. Sedaghat Payam
                  Unfortunately I have not read the novels that Barth has written in the 80 s and 90 s. LETTERS is in my waiting list for reading. But after your comment, I am
                  Message 8 of 23 , Jan 27, 2007
                  • 0 Attachment
                    Unfortunately I have not read the novels that Barth has written in the 80's and 90's. LETTERS is in my waiting list for reading.
                    But after your comment, I am very much interested to know what is particular about Somebody the Sailor. It has a very interesting title.


                    agrimorfee <agrimorfee@...> wrote:
                    It takes a friendly call across the water to make a blip in this
                    forum! I got into Barth by pure chance, browsing in the library where
                    I found Tidewater Tales. I'm a sucker for irregular chapter headings
                    and wacky typefonts in a novel...:)

                    I've followed him ever since, but have been mostly half-hearted to
                    disenchanted with his work since the 1990s. Favorite work? LETTERS.

                    I would be very intrigued with the Iranian response to Somebody The
                    Sailor later on, too.



                    Now that's room service! Choose from over 150,000 hotels
                    in 45,000 destinations on Yahoo! Travel
                    to find your fit.

                  • etarnarutskaya
                    Dear Barth people, I never thought you d answer so promptly and kindheartedly! Thanks a lot for your replies! I ve got a very old and faulty computer and it s
                    Message 9 of 23 , Jan 28, 2007
                    • 0 Attachment
                      Dear Barth people, I never thought you'd answer so promptly and
                      kindheartedly! Thanks a lot for your replies! I've got a very old and
                      faulty computer and it's once in 20 attempts that I can get to yahoo -
                      that's why I'm late to write.

                      I like all three stories in "Chimera". Of course, The Duniasadiade's
                      the nicest at first sight. The second one makes an impression of
                      smth solemn and immovable, reminds of its stars and stone pictures.
                      But the biggest last part with Bellerofon is the strangest. Yes,
                      paradoxical and quite interesting to explore and it also fastens the
                      book making allusions to first parts and even to other Barth's books.

                      Of those, I've read only "The End of the Road", it didn't strike me
                      as something new. But I'm reading "Lost in the Funhouse" now, and
                      it's really interesting so far! What do you think, what fastens
                      thaWhat do you think, what fastens that book, there are so many, so
                      different tales? Which are your favourites? I found here in the
                      Internet that some are studied even in American schools. All in all,
                      how is J B looked at – as a classic or avant guarde? Is it read by
                      the young?

                      By the way, I have to read Barth in translation: unfortunately, it's
                      next to impossible to get English versions here (I live rather far
                      from Moscow, in Samara that lies on the Volga river). Apart from
                      those three books, others aren't available even in Russian, they may
                      not seem profitable to publish. But yes, Mark, people who like
                      literature from all cultures are certainly more alike than different!
                      Still Pinchon's Lot 49, also in Russian sounds too gothic for me.

                      Where do you live? What do you do? I learnt only that Sedaghat lives
                      in Iran. Sedaghat, does "Chimera" lose its aroma through translation?
                      I teach English to university students and adults here in Samara.

                      Elena
                    • M. Sedaghat Payam
                      Dear Elena Thank for you mail, it is good to see there is some activity in this group after a rather long period. First of all as I have already said I didn t
                      Message 10 of 23 , Jan 28, 2007
                      • 0 Attachment
                        Dear Elena
                        Thank for you mail, it is good to see there is some activity in this group after a rather long period.
                        First of all as I have already said I didn't translate Perseid and Bellerphoniad, although I liked the latter very much. But Dunyazadiad sounds damn cool in Persian because it uses names such as Shahrzad, Shahriyar etc. which are quite common in Iran nowadays. On the other hand 1001 nights which has Iranian origins is well-known here as I suppose in the rest of the world. In addition to that novella, I have translated Lost in Funhouse (which is a real nightmare for translators) and Life-Story. The only problem which I may encounter is the censorship of the parts which are considered indecent by Ministry of Islamic Guidance and Culture and I hope the novel passes with one or two minor scratches from the razor of censorship. But it is still too early to worry about that.

                        I have just approached chapter 6 of The End of the Road and so far it has become better and better chapter by chapter. I have learnt many things from that about writing a story so far.
                        I teach English Literature to B.A. students in Parand which is a small city near Tehran. Moreover Sedaghat is a part of my second name and my first name is Mehdy. Whatever. Call me Ishamael (if you will)

                        Regards
                        Mehdy
                        etarnarutskaya <etarnarutskaya@...> wrote:
                        Dear Barth people, I never thought you'd answer so promptly and
                        kindheartedly! Thanks a lot for your replies! I've got a very old and
                        faulty computer and it's once in 20 attempts that I can get to yahoo -
                        that's why I'm late to write.

                        I like all three stories in "Chimera". Of course, The Duniasadiade' s
                        the nicest at first sight. The second one makes an impression of
                        smth solemn and immovable, reminds of its stars and stone pictures.
                        But the biggest last part with Bellerofon is the strangest. Yes,
                        paradoxical and quite interesting to explore and it also fastens the
                        book making allusions to first parts and even to other Barth's books.

                        Of those, I've read only "The End of the Road", it didn't strike me
                        as something new. But I'm reading "Lost in the Funhouse" now, and
                        it's really interesting so far! What do you think, what fastens
                        thaWhat do you think, what fastens that book, there are so many, so
                        different tales? Which are your favourites? I found here in the
                        Internet that some are studied even in American schools. All in all,
                        how is J B looked at – as a classic or avant guarde? Is it read by
                        the young?

                        By the way, I have to read Barth in translation: unfortunately, it's
                        next to impossible to get English versions here (I live rather far
                        from Moscow, in Samara that lies on the Volga river). Apart from
                        those three books, others aren't available even in Russian, they may
                        not seem profitable to publish. But yes, Mark, people who like
                        literature from all cultures are certainly more alike than different!
                        Still Pinchon's Lot 49, also in Russian sounds too gothic for me.

                        Where do you live? What do you do? I learnt only that Sedaghat lives
                        in Iran. Sedaghat, does "Chimera" lose its aroma through translation?
                        I teach English to university students and adults here in Samara.

                        Elena




                        Everyone is raving about the all-new Yahoo! Mail beta.

                      • James McKeogh
                        Lost in the funhouse is one of my favorite barth titles. Night Sea Journey and Ambrose His Mark were exceptionally fun to read and discuss in English class at
                        Message 11 of 23 , Jan 28, 2007
                        • 0 Attachment
                          Lost in the funhouse is one of my favorite barth
                          titles. Night Sea Journey and Ambrose His Mark were
                          exceptionally fun to read and discuss in English class
                          at Penn State (JB actually taught there many years
                          ago). I was working on a thesis that Ambrose's
                          grandfather was actually his father, anyone else
                          agree?


                          james



                          ____________________________________________________________________________________
                          Have a burning question?
                          Go to www.Answers.yahoo.com and get answers from real people who know.
                        • M. Sedaghat Payam
                          Ambrose s Grandpa as his father? Well I have to read Ambrose His Mark Again. James McKeogh wrote: Lost
                          Message 12 of 23 , Jan 29, 2007
                          • 0 Attachment
                            Ambrose's Grandpa as his father? Well I have to read Ambrose His Mark Again.

                            James McKeogh <jhmckeogh@...> wrote:
                            Lost in the funhouse is one of my favorite barth
                            titles. Night Sea Journey and Ambrose His Mark were
                            exceptionally fun to read and discuss in English class
                            at Penn State (JB actually taught there many years
                            ago). I was working on a thesis that Ambrose's
                            grandfather was actually his father, anyone else
                            agree?

                            james

                            ____________ _________ _________ _________ _________ _________ _
                            Have a burning question?
                            Go to www.Answers. yahoo.com and get answers from real people who know.


                            Finding fabulous fares is fun.
                            Let Yahoo! FareChase search your favorite travel sites to find flight and hotel bargains.

                          • James McKeogh
                            its been a while since i ve read it, but keep in mind the bees belong to grandpa, and, like night see journey, only one gets through to sting mom (on the
                            Message 13 of 23 , Jan 29, 2007
                            • 0 Attachment
                              its been a while since i've read it, but keep in mind
                              the bees belong to grandpa, and, like night see
                              journey, only one gets through to sting mom (on the
                              breast). other parellels to the bees and the sperm
                              permeate. also, i believe there may be double meaning
                              to the elder berries (or flowers) that grandpa rubs
                              all over the bee hive. elder berries may be the fruit
                              of an older gent. He's also highlighted as not being
                              bashful around the nakedness of the nursing daughter
                              in law. i'll re-read it and note a couple more
                              instances.


                              james

                              --- "M. Sedaghat Payam" <woolf_543@...> wrote:

                              > Ambrose's Grandpa as his father? Well I have to read
                              > Ambrose His Mark Again.
                              >
                              > James McKeogh <jhmckeogh@...> wrote:
                              > Lost in the funhouse is one
                              > of my favorite barth
                              > titles. Night Sea Journey and Ambrose His Mark
                              > were
                              > exceptionally fun to read and discuss in English
                              > class
                              > at Penn State (JB actually taught there many years
                              > ago). I was working on a thesis that Ambrose's
                              > grandfather was actually his father, anyone else
                              > agree?
                              >
                              > james
                              >
                              >
                              >
                              __________________________________________________________
                              > Have a burning question?
                              > Go to www.Answers.yahoo.com and get answers from
                              > real people who know.
                              >
                              >
                              >
                              >
                              >
                              > ---------------------------------
                              > Finding fabulous fares is fun.
                              > Let Yahoo! FareChase search your favorite travel
                              > sites to find flight and hotel bargains.




                              ____________________________________________________________________________________
                              Now that's room service! Choose from over 150,000 hotels
                              in 45,000 destinations on Yahoo! Travel to find your fit.
                              http://farechase.yahoo.com/promo-generic-14795097
                            • agrimorfee
                              ... JB at one point in Tidewater Tales postulates a notion that one s father is actually their grandfather--if one also buys the notion that a father s sperm
                              Message 14 of 23 , Jan 29, 2007
                              • 0 Attachment
                                --- In johnbarth@yahoogroups.com, James McKeogh <jhmckeogh@...> wrote:
                                >
                                > Lost in the funhouse is one of my favorite barth
                                > titles. Night Sea Journey and Ambrose His Mark were
                                > exceptionally fun to read and discuss in English class
                                > at Penn State (JB actually taught there many years
                                > ago). I was working on a thesis that Ambrose's
                                > grandfather was actually his father, anyone else
                                > agree?
                                >
                                >

                                JB at one point in Tidewater Tales postulates a notion that one's
                                father is actually their grandfather--if one also buys the notion that
                                a father's sperm is the actual "father" of a child (as an ovum would
                                be the "mother").
                              • Elena Tarnarutskaya
                                I m going back to Lost in the Funhouse that s full od dubble and triple meanings. Does it seem possible for you to look at it as a novel, with the beginning
                                Message 15 of 23 , Feb 24, 2007
                                • 0 Attachment
                                   
                                  I'm going back to Lost in the Funhouse that's full od dubble and triple meanings.
                                  Does it seem possible for you to look at it as a novel,
                                  with the beginning set in US 50-s + novel self-reflection,
                                  and part 2 where the self-reflection is turned to its mythological proto-narration?
                                  Elena

                                  James McKeogh <jhmckeogh@...> wrote:
                                  its been a while since i've read it, but keep in mind
                                  the bees belong to grandpa, and, like night see
                                  journey, only one gets through to sting mom (on the
                                  breast). other parellels to the bees and the sperm
                                  permeate. also, i believe there may be double meaning
                                  to the elder berries (or flowers) that grandpa rubs
                                  all over the bee hive. elder berries may be the fruit
                                  of an older gent. He's also highlighted as not being
                                  bashful around the nakedness of the nursing daughter
                                  in law. i'll re-read it and note a couple more
                                  instances.

                                  james

                                  --- "M. Sedaghat Payam" <woolf_543@yahoo. com> wrote:

                                  > Ambrose's Grandpa as his father? Well I have to read
                                  > Ambrose His Mark Again.
                                  >
                                  > James McKeogh <jhmckeogh@yahoo. com> wrote:
                                  > Lost in the funhouse is one
                                  > of my favorite barth
                                  > titles. Night Sea Journey and Ambrose His Mark
                                  > were
                                  > exceptionally fun to read and discuss in English
                                  > class
                                  > at Penn State (JB actually taught there many years
                                  > ago). I was working on a thesis that Ambrose's
                                  > grandfather was actually his father, anyone else
                                  > agree?
                                  >
                                  > james
                                  >
                                  >
                                  >
                                  ____________ _________ _________ _________ _________ _________ _
                                  > Have a burning question?
                                  > Go to www.Answers. yahoo.com and get answers from
                                  > real people who know.
                                  >
                                  >
                                  >
                                  >
                                  >
                                  > ------------ --------- --------- ---
                                  > Finding fabulous fares is fun.
                                  > Let Yahoo! FareChase search your favorite travel
                                  > sites to find flight and hotel bargains.

                                  ____________ _________ _________ _________ _________ _________ _
                                  Now that's room service! Choose from over 150,000 hotels
                                  in 45,000 destinations on Yahoo! Travel to find your fit.
                                  http://farechase. yahoo.com/ promo-generic- 14795097


                                  Don't get soaked. Take a quick peak at the forecast
                                  with theYahoo! Search weather shortcut.

                                • Mark Brawner
                                  ... I d hesitate to call it a novel, although I do try to perceive (with limited success or insight, I must admit) Barth s declared intention that it be
                                  Message 16 of 23 , Feb 24, 2007
                                  • 0 Attachment
                                    Elena wrote:

                                    > I'm going back to Lost in the Funhouse that's full od dubble and triple meanings.
                                    > Does it seem possible for you to look at it as a novel,
                                    > with the beginning set in US 50-s + novel self-reflection,
                                    > and part 2 where the self-reflection is turned to its mythological proto-narration?Elena

                                    I'd hesitate to call it a novel, although I do try to perceive (with
                                    limited success or insight, I must admit) Barth's declared intention
                                    that it be received as a quote "*book* of short stories: a sequence or
                                    series rather than a mere assortment . . . strung together on a few
                                    echoed and developed themes" circling/twisting back on itself like a
                                    Mobius strip. (This from the front matter to the Anchor Literary
                                    Library version)

                                    And your perception of two thematic and/or stylistic halves seems
                                    reasonable enough (with the caveat that I haven't read the thing in a
                                    few years). Though I'd be interested to hear more about what you mean
                                    by "mythological proto-narration."
                                  • agrimorfee
                                    ... triple meanings. ... mythological proto-narration? ... Are you referring to just Lost In the Funhouse and Ambrose His Mark ? I tend to think that both
                                    Message 17 of 23 , Feb 27, 2007
                                    • 0 Attachment
                                      --- In johnbarth@yahoogroups.com, Elena Tarnarutskaya
                                      <etarnarutskaya@...> wrote:
                                      >
                                      >
                                      > I'm going back to Lost in the Funhouse that's full od dubble and
                                      triple meanings.
                                      > Does it seem possible for you to look at it as a novel,
                                      > with the beginning set in US 50-s + novel self-reflection,
                                      > and part 2 where the self-reflection is turned to its
                                      mythological proto-narration?
                                      > Elena


                                      Are you referring to just "Lost In the Funhouse" and "Ambrose His
                                      Mark"?

                                      I tend to think that both stories were the seeds of a an
                                      autobiographical novel that Barth abandoned...in the later novel
                                      LETTERS, we meet Ambrose again but as a middle-aged, failed author.
                                      Ambrose refers to those 2 stories as chapters that "he" wrote but
                                      gave to John Barth, and we get to read further chapters in
                                      the "novel" that "he" never finished.
                                    • Elena Tarnarutskaya
                                      I d hesitate to call it a novel, although I do try to perceive (with limited success or insight, I must admit) Barth s declared intention that it be received
                                      Message 18 of 23 , Mar 4, 2007
                                      • 0 Attachment

                                        I'd hesitate to call it a novel, although I do try to perceive (with
                                        limited success or insight, I must admit) Barth's declared intention
                                        that it be received as a quote "*book* of short stories: a sequence or
                                        series rather than a mere assortment . . . strung together on a few
                                        echoed and developed themes" circling/twisting back on itself like a
                                        Mobius strip. (This from the front matter to the Anchor Literary
                                        Library version)

                                        And your perception of two thematic and/or stylistic halves seems
                                        reasonable enough (with the caveat that I haven't read the thing in a
                                        few years). Though I'd be interested to hear more about what you mean
                                        by "mythological proto-narration. "


                                        Expecting? Get great news right away with email Auto-Check.
                                        Try the Yahoo! Mail Beta.

                                      • etarnarutskaya
                                        ... and ... there are about 10 stories more. But the seeds of the autobiografical novel are very talented. Thank you for telling me that they were used in
                                        Message 19 of 23 , Mar 4, 2007
                                        • 0 Attachment
                                          --- In johnbarth@yahoogroups.com, "agrimorfee" <agrimorfee@...>
                                          wrote:
                                          >
                                          > --- In johnbarth@yahoogroups.com, Elena Tarnarutskaya
                                          > <etarnarutskaya@> wrote:
                                          > >
                                          > >
                                          > > I'm going back to Lost in the Funhouse that's full od dubble
                                          and
                                          > triple meanings.
                                          > > Does it seem possible for you to look at it as a novel,
                                          > > with the beginning set in US 50-s + novel self-reflection,
                                          > > and part 2 where the self-reflection is turned to its
                                          > mythological proto-narration?
                                          > > Elena
                                          >
                                          >
                                          > Are you referring to just "Lost In the Funhouse" and "Ambrose His
                                          > Mark"?
                                          > I was referring to the whole book "Lost in the Funhouse" where
                                          there are about 10 stories more. But the seeds of the
                                          autobiografical novel are very talented. Thank you for telling me
                                          that they were used in LETTERS. By the way,how do you look at the
                                          cases when characters or episodes roam from one book to others?
                                          > I tend to think that both stories were the seeds of a an
                                          > autobiographical novel that Barth abandoned...in the later novel
                                          > LETTERS, we meet Ambrose again but as a middle-aged, failed
                                          author.
                                          > Ambrose refers to those 2 stories as chapters that "he" wrote but
                                          > gave to John Barth, and we get to read further chapters in
                                          > the "novel" that "he" never finished.
                                          >
                                        • Elena Tarnarutskaya
                                          (Sorry for sending empty messages, I must have pushed wrong buttons, hoping this one is being sent) I see mythological proto-narration as narrative patterns
                                          Message 20 of 23 , Mar 7, 2007
                                          • 0 Attachment
                                            (Sorry for sending empty messages, I must have pushed wrong buttons, hoping this one is being sent)
                                            I see mythological proto-narration as narrative patterns stored in folklore and myth.
                                            Thank you for the observation of the abandoned autobiographical novel! I didn't know thar Ambrose appears in a later novel.
                                             
                                            Judging by this and other instances when Barth's favourite characters roam throughout his books, they might seem one gygantic novel - out of how many?(that's a joke -or maybe not...)





                                            Be a PS3 game guru.
                                            Get your game face on with the latest PS3 news and previews at Yahoo! Games.

                                          • agrimorfee
                                            ... wrote: By the way,how do you look at the ... I usually enjoy these situations. Stephen King, for example, has had a habit of
                                            Message 21 of 23 , Mar 9, 2007
                                            • 0 Attachment
                                              --- In johnbarth@yahoogroups.com, "etarnarutskaya"
                                              <etarnarutskaya@...> wrote:
                                              By the way,how do you look at the
                                              > cases when characters or episodes roam from one book to others?

                                              I usually enjoy these situations. Stephen King, for example, has had a
                                              habit of referencing characters and situations from one novel(or
                                              story) into others. His novels and stories that take place in "Castle
                                              Rock, Maine" are typical of this.
                                            • Elena Tarnarutskaya
                                              Dear Mehdy How do you like The End of the Road so far? What do you think of the doctor who treats the protagonist with myths? What have you learnt from the
                                              Message 22 of 23 , Mar 10, 2007
                                              • 0 Attachment
                                                Dear Mehdy
                                                How do you like "The End of the Road" so far? What do you think of the doctor who treats the protagonist with myths? What have you learnt from the book about writing stories? Do Iranian students like J B?
                                                In Russia his books, although evalluated mostly in academic environment aren't popular with general public. But some advanced students interested in modern inellectual writing, read them.
                                                Best regards
                                                Elena
                                                LLooking forward to IIn Russia


                                                Never miss an email again!
                                                Yahoo! Toolbar
                                                alerts you the instant new Mail arrives. Check it out.
                                              • M. Sedaghat Payam
                                                Dear Elena As a matter of fact there has not been a translation of John Barth in Persian yet, and my collection of Barth s stories of Barth will be the first
                                                Message 23 of 23 , Mar 10, 2007
                                                • 0 Attachment
                                                  Dear Elena
                                                  As a matter of fact there has not been a translation of John Barth in Persian yet, and my collection of Barth's stories of Barth will be the first of its kind. I am hopeful that Dunyazadiad finds a huge amount of readers. Here in Iran people buy the books either because of their writers or because of their translators. I am not a famous translator because it is my second book and few people actually know Barth. Thus I have to wait and see what will be the readers' reaction by September in which the translation will be published.
                                                  Personally I like Barth's works a lot and that novel taught me a lot about writing a good story I always wondered how can you narrate the story without the dialogue or direct narration and this novel gave me a good idea of how to come up with a good mixture of both rather than trying to come up with a third way. The idea of mythotherapy and all the other methods of therapy was so original and considering the fact that he wrote it when he was 24, I appreciate him a lot more.The doctor and his peculiar hospital were so bizarre and I still can not say what I think about them. What is your idea concerning the hospital and the doctor?

                                                  Reagrds
                                                  Mehdy

                                                   
                                                  Elena Tarnarutskaya <etarnarutskaya@...> wrote:
                                                  Dear Mehdy
                                                  How do you like "The End of the Road" so far? What do you think of the doctor who treats the protagonist with myths? What have you learnt from the book about writing stories? Do Iranian students like J B?
                                                  In Russia his books, although evalluated mostly in academic environment aren't popular with general public. But some advanced students interested in modern inellectual writing, read them.
                                                  Best regards
                                                  Elena
                                                  LLooking forward to IIn Russia

                                                  Never miss an email again!
                                                  Yahoo! Toolbar
                                                  alerts you the instant new Mail arrives. Check it out.


                                                  Food fight? Enjoy some healthy debate
                                                  in the Yahoo! Answers Food & Drink Q&A.

                                                Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.