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3 roads in the mail & a Barth ref

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  • Krzysztof Majer
    Hey there! Three Roads is on its way to me, courtesy of the German branch of the veritable Amazon (I m living in Flensburg, Germany until August). Hopefully
    Message 1 of 3 , Jun 4, 2006
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      Hey there!

      "Three Roads" is on its way to me, courtesy of the German branch of
      the veritable Amazon (I'm living in Flensburg, Germany until August).
      Hopefully it goes down better than "Nights", which I couldn't
      (repeatedly) get into. But intend to try again, maybe this summer. As
      for "Three Roads", it seems short enough to make a quick reading
      in-between all the PhD stuff, of which - frankly - I'm sick to the
      stomach.

      Meanwhile, I'm stumped with a Barth reference, so where else do I turn
      for help if not to you? Somewhere in the Friday Book, the Man talks
      about how we misguidedly assume that the realistic mode of fiction is
      the "novel proper", just because it's so dominant in (especially
      popular) 20th century fiction, whereas, of course, Rabelais,
      Cervantes, Sterne, Fielding, etc etc. Now Milan Kundera talks about it
      too, entertainingly, as the alternative road that fiction renounced,
      in a volume of essays (The Art of the Novel?); but I'm pretty sure I
      first read it in the Friday pieces. Alas, I don't have the book here,
      and the Flensburg library doesn't have it either. Does anyone
      remember, or, failing that, could have a peep? I've got a footnote for
      an article ready, but would need the page number. It's just a minor
      thing, an aside - but still, fun to insert Barth somewhere.

      Hope you all are well!

      K
    • Mark Brawner
      Hey Kris, Good to hear from you. This bit from from The Literature of Exhaustion (page 72 in The Friday Book) may be on the mark: http://tinyurl.com/gw2yr
      Message 2 of 3 , Jun 5, 2006
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        Hey Kris,

        Good to hear from you. This bit from from The Literature of
        Exhaustion (page 72 in The Friday Book) may be on the mark:

        http://tinyurl.com/gw2yr [amazon]

        Regards,
        Mark

        On 6/4/06, Krzysztof Majer <kmajer@...> wrote:
        >I'm stumped with a Barth reference, so where else do I turn
        > for help if not to you? Somewhere in the Friday Book, the Man talks
        > about how we misguidedly assume that the realistic mode of fiction is
        > the "novel proper", just because it's so dominant in (especially
        > popular) 20th century fiction, whereas, of course, Rabelais,
        > Cervantes, Sterne, Fielding, etc etc. Now Milan Kundera talks about it
        > too, entertainingly, as the alternative road that fiction renounced,
        > in a volume of essays (The Art of the Novel?); but I'm pretty sure I
        > first read it in the Friday pieces. Alas, I don't have the book here,
        > and the Flensburg library doesn't have it either. Does anyone
        > remember, or, failing that, could have a peep? I've got a footnote for
        > an article ready, but would need the page number. It's just a minor
        > thing, an aside - but still, fun to insert Barth somewhere.
        >
        > Hope you all are well!
        >
        > K
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        >
        > Yahoo! Groups Links
        >
        >
        >
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        >
        >
        >
      • Krzysztof Majer
        Thanks Mark! It s not exactly the bit I wanted, but it makes a similar point, so it will do for a reference - I refashioned the footnote slightly. 3 Roads
        Message 3 of 3 , Jun 10, 2006
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          Thanks Mark! It's not exactly the bit I wanted, but it makes a similar
          point, so it will do for a reference - I refashioned the footnote slightly.

          3 Roads still haven't arrived.

          K
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