Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

[John_Lit] Gospels for All Christians

Expand Messages
  • Stan Harstine
    I have a question to put to the list regarding the above and the work produced by Richard Bauckham et al (1998), The Gospels for all Christians . Reviews
    Message 1 of 2 , Jun 2, 1999
    • 0 Attachment
      I have a question to put to the list regarding the above and the work
      produced by Richard Bauckham et al (1998), "The Gospels for all
      Christians". Reviews have been slow coming out, and the possible
      implications have not yet been touched on. What are the thoughts of
      listmembers on the book's impact on Johannine studies - esp. theories of
      composition. (I'm also sorry it wasn't out in time for comment in Prof.
      Moloney's commentary.)

      Nigel

      Nigel and Rebecca Hanscamp
      Trinity Methodist Theological College
      Auckland Consortium of Theological Education, New Zealand
      Email: nar.hanscamp@...
      ====

      The main tenet of Bauckham's work is that the assumption that the
      gospels were written for a small community is simply that, an
      assumption. There has been no real argument for the "localization" of
      the gospel audience. This opinion was also put forth by Charles H.
      Talbert in Reading John, 63, who distinguishes the Pauline letter
      written to a town from the gospels, written as foundation documents.
      Talbert questions whether it is possible to use the gospels to determine
      specific problems of the "community."

      The implications of Bauckham's series of essays are profound. One I'd
      like to put forth in relation to John is that the audience of the gospel
      was not an isolated, i.e. separatist, community as it is often held.
      Rather, the audience of the gospel was familiar with other texts and
      traditions in Judaism, emerging Christianity, and Hellenism. Because
      Bauckham, Burridge et. al. question the basic presuppositions of Gospel
      audience, the book's arguments must be acknowledged and accounted for in
      future discussions of the matter.

      Stan Harstine
      Baylor University
      Waco, Texas

      http://www.bigfoot.com/~Stan_Harstine


      ------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subscribe: send e-mail briefly describing your academic background & research interests to johannine_literature-subscribe@egroups.com
      Unsubscribe: e-mail johannine_literature-unsubscribe@egroups.com
      Contact list managers: e-mail johannine_literature-owner@egroups.com
    • Steve Moyise
      If a Revelation specialist from England can comment, it seems to me that Bauckham has shown the methodical weaknesses in contructing a Markan or Matthaean
      Message 2 of 2 , Jun 2, 1999
      • 0 Attachment
        If a Revelation specialist from England can comment, it seems to me that
        Bauckham has shown the methodical weaknesses in contructing a Markan or
        Matthaean community, but this hardly applies to John, where we do have the
        epistles to work with. We may dispute how large an area we are talking
        about, but some sort of 'history' can be written of whoever was involved in
        producing them.
        I also find his suggestion that John was written to tell people familiar
        with Mark what happened 'before John was imprisoned' an unlikely
        explanation of John 1-4. Instead of the 'messianic secret', this would
        appear to require 'messianic amnesia'.

        Steve Moyise
        England

        ------------------------------------------------------------------------
        Subscribe: send e-mail briefly describing your academic background & research interests to johannine_literature-subscribe@egroups.com
        Unsubscribe: e-mail johannine_literature-unsubscribe@egroups.com
        Contact list managers: e-mail johannine_literature-owner@egroups.com
      Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.