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RE: [John_Lit] Staley's Changing Woman and Postcolonialism

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  • Staley, Jeffrey
    Didn t know Jeff Staley was listening in. I have been out of town for a few weeks, and am just getting back to look at my email. The question is whether
    Message 1 of 4 , Aug 7, 2000
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      Didn't know Jeff Staley was listening in.

      I have been out of town for a few weeks, and am just getting back to look at
      my email.

      The question is whether postcolonialism is a historical anomaly of
      postmodernism or whether the NT is a postcolonial text itself and so demands
      a postcolonial interpretation.

      I think it would be anachronistic to say that the NT is a postcolonial text.
      However, I do believe it can be used in ways amenable to postcolonial
      interests.

      Jeff, could you let me know your e'mail address.

      My home email address is: staleyjl@... I'd like to talk to you further
      about Johannine issues and your dissertation topic.

      Jeff
    • Staley, Jeffrey
      Jeff, I just finished reading your fine and thoughtful article Changing Woman: Postcolonial Reflections on Acts 16:6-40 . Before the Johannine delete this
      Message 2 of 4 , Aug 7, 2000
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        Jeff, I just finished reading your fine and thoughtful
        article "Changing Woman: Postcolonial Reflections on
        Acts 16:6-40".

        Before the Johannine delete this message, you should know that the starting
        point for my analysis of Acts 16:6-40 was Musa Dube's Semeia 76 article
        entitled "Reading for Decolonization (john 4:1-42)


        I don't have access to a library these days, but I
        recall reading of a story of one of Mani's followers
        (or was it Mani himself?) having a vision of being
        stopped from entering India by a goddess-like figure
        until he had proven his worthiness by the greatness of
        his wisdom.

        This is an interesting parallel! Wish I had it when I wrote the essay.
        Anyone know the exact "Mani" reference Jeffery is referring to?

        Or does it? If we wanted to deconstruct the
        imperialistic hermeneutic of Paul's mission to
        Macedonia,

        Jeffery, please send your Acts response to my home email (staleyj@...).
        We'll talk about it "Offline" so to speak.

        So ... how do we apply a postcolonialist analysis to
        John? Who else is doing this, and what do they say?

        A group of us are exploring this in a volume of collected essays on
        postcolonialism and John for Sheffield Academic Press. It is envigorating,
        exciting work, but will take some time to come to any consensus. By and
        large, we do not start from any historicist assumption that the NT "is"
        "postcolonial."
      • Horace Jeffery Hodges
        Dear Jeff Staley, ... I have asked and received an answer from my friend Samuel Lieu and am posting it on the Johannine listserve as well in case anybody else
        Message 3 of 4 , Aug 11, 2000
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          Dear Jeff Staley,

          About my citation:

          > I don't have access to a library these days, but I
          > recall reading of a story of one of Mani's followers
          > (or was it Mani himself?) having a vision of being
          > stopped from entering India by a goddess-like figure
          > until he had proven his worthiness by the greatness
          > of
          > his wisdom.
          >
          > This is an interesting parallel! Wish I had it when
          > I wrote the essay.
          > Anyone know the exact "Mani" reference Jeffery is
          > referring to?

          I have asked and received an answer from my friend
          Samuel Lieu and am posting it on the Johannine
          listserve as well in case anybody else is interested:

          �������������������������������������������������������

          Dear Jeffery,
          The story is about Mar Ammo at the gates of Kushan. It
          comes from the famous Manichaean manuscript M2 and is
          in Middle Persian. It can be found in translation in
          Klimkeit, Gnosis on the Silk Road, p. 204.
          Yours,
          Sam

          �������������������������������������������������������

          As you see, it was a follower of Mani rather than Mani
          himself.

          Hope that this helps,

          Jeffery Hodges

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