Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

[John_Lit] Re: John 1:29

Expand Messages
  • N & RJ Hanscamp
    James Brownson wrote * These contextual clues lead me to read the verse in a revelatory sense. The Lamb of God ushers in the new passover from death to life,
    Message 1 of 5 , May 27, 1999
    • 0 Attachment
      James Brownson wrote
      >* These contextual clues lead me to read the verse in a revelatory sense.
      >The Lamb of God ushers in the new passover from death to life, from
      darkness
      >to light, from bondage to freedom. Sin (note it is singular, focusing on
      >power rather than transgression) is removed by the light that shines in the
      >darkness and opens up the path to freedom.

      This would agree with the section in 1.32-34 where two other things are
      revealed
      1. The existence of a baptism by the Spirit, and 2. the presence of Jesus
      as the one who will baptise EN PNEUMATI HAGIO i.e. Jesus as Geitsttäufe
      See Felix Porsch "Pneuma und Wort" p.19)

      >* Hence for John, sin is not a debt that must be paid, but a condition of
      >blindness or bondage from which one must be freed, through the revelation
      of
      >Christ.

      i.e. passive - being freed? Yes, but ....
      I'm not so sure about this one. IMHO, while blindness is a feature of the
      gospel, the way *sin* is treated in e.g. 5.14 & 8.11 indicates that there is
      an active component to the way humans are to deal with sin (MHKETI
      hAMARTANE - do not sin anymore), as well as the active "taking way" which is
      done by the AMNOS TOU QEOU

      >* Of course, John has several allusions to the language of sacrifice, such
      >as 11:50. And there is a strong motif in John of Jesus' death as an
      >expression of love for his own. Yet even here, the fourth gospel usually
      >highlights these elements as an example to be imitated, rather than a gift
      >of forgiveness to be received. Its primary function seems to be ethical,
      >rather than soteriological.

      Both. The ethical "doing" and the "being done to".

      I would value your response to this.



      Nigel


      Nigel and Rebecca Hanscamp
      Trinity Methodist Theological College
      Auckland Consortium of Theological Education, New Zealand
      Email: nar.hanscamp@...



      ------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subscribe: send e-mail briefly describing your academic background & research interests to johannine_literature-subscribe@egroups.com
      Unsubscribe: e-mail johannine_literature-unsubscribe@egroups.com
      Contact list managers: e-mail johannine_literature-owner@egroups.com
    Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.