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Re: [John_Lit] John 21

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  • Fabbri Marco
    Jack, your suggestion that John 21 was the lost ending of Mark is intriguing. However, I would need to understand better what happened before and what happened
    Message 1 of 20 , Nov 27, 2006
      Jack,

      your suggestion that John 21 was the lost ending of Mark is intriguing.

      However, I would need to understand better what happened before and what
      happened after. What is your general picture?

      Is it something like:

      1) Mark 1-16,8 + John 21 written as one Gospel
      2) John 1-20 written as another indipendent Gospel
      3) John 21 moved from the end of Mark to the end of John, after John 20,31
      4) Mark 16,9-20 added after Mark 16,8 to replace the missing ending.

      Is this you idea? Or should anything be corrected?

      Marco V Fabbri


      On 11/24/06, Jack Kilmon <jkilmon@...> wrote:
      >
      >
      > ----- Original Message -----
      > From: "Arlene Sheldon" <wellofbethlehem@...<wellofbethlehem%40yahoo.com>
      > >
      > To: <johannine_literature@yahoogroups.com<johannine_literature%40yahoogroups.com>
      > >
      > Sent: Monday, November 20, 2006 11:47 PM
      > Subject: Re: [John_Lit] John 21
      >
      > > Jack,
      > >
      > > Regarding John 21, I have discovered a few interesting points. First,
      > > there are several similarities between John 21 and the book of Jonah.
      > > Jonah allows himself to be cast into the sea, and Peter casts himself
      > into
      > > the sea. Jonah is swallowed by a fish, but Peter catches fish and then
      > > eats some fish. The people of Ninevah don't know the difference between
      > > their right hand and their left hand, so Jonah has to tell them. The
      > > disciples don't know to fish on the right side of the boat, so Jesus has
      >
      > > to tell them. The King of Ninevah takes his robe off, but Peter puts his
      >
      > > clothes on. There is a discussion of whether Jonah should die, and
      > whether
      > > the people of Ninevah should live, and there is a discussion of how
      > Peter
      > > will die, and whether John should live.
      > >
      > > Second, there is a link between John 21 and Ezekiel 47:9,10, which says
      > > an abundance of fish is caused by an abundance of water flowing into the
      >
      > > sea, and the abundance of fish in John 21 occurs when Jesus, the giver
      > of
      > > living water, is standing on the shore.
      > >
      > > Third, Jesus' cooking and serving breakfast seems to be linked to the
      > > 23rd Psalm. When Jesus fed the multitudes, the people ate and were
      > > satisfied, so they didn't "want." Jesus had them recline where there was
      >
      > > "much grass," like sheep in a pasture. He went to the other side of the
      > > lake, and the people followed him, so he led them beside the still
      > water.
      > > Eventually, it's time to prepare the table of Psalm 23. Peter is
      > alienated
      > > from Jesus because he denied him. They are "enemies," who need to be
      > > reconciled. Jesus prepares the breakfast and invites Peter, who is very
      > > reluctant to say that he loves Jesus. These apparent allusions to the
      > 23rd
      > > Psalm seem to establish that Jesus is the good shepherd who gives his
      > life
      > > for the sheep.
      > >
      > > Fourth, the most interesting link, and the one that seems to tie
      > > everything else together, is the link between John 21 and Acts 2. Of the
      >
      > > six disciples who remain in the boat after Peter jumps out, two of them
      > > were named explicitly, two were named indirectly, as "ones of Zebedee,"
      > > and two are anonymous. As Peter wraps up his sermon on the day of
      > > Pentecost in Acts 2, he says "the promise" is for three groups of people
      >
      > > 1) you, 2) your children 3) all who are afar off. Note the similarity
      > > between these three groups of people and the three types of people on
      > the
      > > boat in John 21 - people you address directly, children of people you
      > > address directly, and people who are more distant, or unknown or
      > > anonymous. The six disciples in the boat seem to be representative of
      > the
      > > people Peter will address his remarks to on the day of Pentecost.
      > >
      > > Lastly, there is a relationship between Jesus the good shepherd, who
      > > gives his life for the sheep, and Jesus the giver of living water. This
      > > relationship is found in 1 Chron 11:15-19. David's three men risk their
      > > own lives to get David a drink of water from the well of bethlehem.
      > David
      > > values the water as the blood of the men who obtained it for him. Like
      > the
      > > men who obtained the water for David, Jesus sacrifices his own life to
      > pay
      > > the cost of providing the living water of the Holy Spirit to those who
      > > believe and receive.
      > >
      > > I wouldn't be too quick to say that John 21 was added on to the Gospel
      > of
      > > John, because the Gospel of John doesn't seem to be complete without it.
      > >
      > > Arlene Sheldon
      >
      > Very good observations. It is my opinion, however, that Ch 21 was
      > originally the ending of Mark and appended tyo John in an attempt to
      > reconcile Petrine-antiPetrine hostilities between the two.
      >
      > Jack
      >
      > Jack Kilmon
      > San Marcos, Texas
      >
      >
      >



      --
      _______________________________________
      Prof. Marco V. Fabbri
      Dipartimento di Sacra Scrittura
      Pontificia Università della Santa Croce
      Piazza S. Apollinare 49
      I-00186 Roma
      Italy

      e-mail: mv.fabbri@...
      fax: ++39-06-68164400


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