Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.
 

Re: [John_Lit] Prologue As Midrash Part I

Expand Messages
  • SemioticSymphony@aol.com
    In a message dated 11/22/2005 10:53:02 A.M. Eastern Standard Time, pastor_t@pacbell.net writes: In other words, the theory I am advancing is that the Prolog
    Message 1 of 1 , Nov 22, 2005
      In a message dated 11/22/2005 10:53:02 A.M. Eastern Standard Time,
      pastor_t@... writes:

      In other words, the theory I am advancing is that the
      Prolog (and possibly the entire Gospel) is the product
      of a didactic method (midrash) used by a Rabbinic
      school which was striving to interpret the meaning of
      the Jesus tradition, using the language of the Torah.



      Tom:

      No one seriously disputes the midrashic elements of the NT; some have
      asserted that all the NT texts are midrashim on the Hebrew Scriptures. As Mark
      Matson has noted, the definition of "midrash" tends to expand and contract,
      depending on its context. Though I much prefer the concept of "intertextuality" to
      midrash, Mark recognizes the jargonish problems presented by both terms.

      If "midrash" is restricted to its conventional senses of 'inquiry' and
      'interpretation' then certainly the Prologue bears a midrashic relationship to
      Genesis 1. Though the Qumran texts use "midrash" to refer to 'instruction' I
      would be shy about emphasizing the "didactic" thrust of the term.

      Best regards,
      Joe C.

      Joseph Calandrino



      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.