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Re: [John_Lit] Jn 2.29 "rejoices in joy"

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  • Q Bee
    ... Most of the translations say rejoices greatly . Mother Elaine+ Tacoma, WA
    Message 1 of 5 , Feb 1, 2005
      On Jan 31, 2005, at 7:56 AM, Andrew T. Dolan wrote:
      >
      > Can anyone tell me the literary term for an expression such
      > as "rejoices in joy" (Jn 3.29)? I think it might be the same as for
      > an expression such as "light the light."
      >
      Most of the translations say 'rejoices greatly'.

      Mother Elaine+

      Tacoma, WA
    • Timothy P. Jenney
      ... Andy, I think my language profs referred to it as periphrastic phrasing [which it is], but it think the more precise term is polyptoton (see
      Message 2 of 5 , Feb 1, 2005
        > Can anyone tell me the literary term for an expression such
        > as "rejoices in joy" (Jn 3.29)? I think it might be the same as for
        > an expression such as "light the light."

        Andy,

        I think my language profs referred to it as periphrastic phrasing [which it
        is], but it think the more precise term is polyptoton (see
        http://www.nipissingu.ca/faculty/williams/figofspe.htm#Figures%20of%20Repeti
        tion%20(words).

        The figure is very common in Hebrew, where it is used to provide emphasis.
        This probably influenced its use in the Greek of 4G.

        Timothy P. Jenney
        Adj. Prof., Asbury Theological Seminary-Orlando



        > From: "Andrew T. Dolan" <rev921scholar@...>
        > Reply-To: johannine_literature@yahoogroups.com
        > Date: Mon, 31 Jan 2005 15:56:18 -0000
        > To: johannine_literature@yahoogroups.com
        > Subject: [John_Lit] Jn 2.29 "rejoices in joy"
        >
        >
        >

        >
        > Many thanks.
        >
        > Andy
        >
        > Andrew T. Dolan
        > Graduate Biblical Studies Faculty
        > Core Adjunct Professor of Religion
        > Adjunct Professor of Latin
        > La Salle University
        > 1900 W. Olney Avenue
        > Philadelphia, PA 19141
        > http://www.lasalle.edu/~dolan/links.htm
        > dolan@...
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        > pharmaka@...
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      • Beata Urbanek
        J 3,29: CHARA CHAIREI is associative dative (dativus modi which in this case is also dativus internus). It is used in the NT as a imitation of the Hebrew
        Message 3 of 5 , Feb 1, 2005
          J 3,29: CHARA CHAIREI is associative dative (dativus modi which in this case
          is also dativus internus). It is used in the NT as a imitation of the Hebrew
          infinitive absolute (Gen 2,17: mot tamut - you shall die by death). The
          construction is used for emphasis.

          Is this what you were asking?
          Beata

          Beata Urbanek
          PhD student
          Institute of Biblical Studies
          Catholic University of Lublin

          ----- Original Message -----
          From: "Andrew T. Dolan" <rev921scholar@...>
          To: <johannine_literature@yahoogroups.com>
          Sent: Monday, January 31, 2005 4:56 PM
          Subject: [John_Lit] Jn 2.29 "rejoices in joy"


          >
          >
          > Can anyone tell me the literary term for an expression such
          > as "rejoices in joy" (Jn 3.29)? I think it might be the same as for
          > an expression such as "light the light."
          >
          > Many thanks.
          >
          > Andy
          >
        • Beata Urbanek
          P.S. My previous explanation was a grammatical one. Literary it is etymologica figura (schema etymologicum). It is also paranomasia (affinity in
          Message 4 of 5 , Feb 1, 2005
            P.S. My previous explanation was a grammatical one. Literary it is
            etymologica figura (schema etymologicum). It is also paranomasia (affinity
            in pronunciation).

            Beata Urbanek
            Salle University
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