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Re: [John_Lit] re: John 19:11b

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  • SemioticSymphony@aol.com
    In a message dated 3/8/2004 8:10:56 PM Eastern Standard Time, tmcos@rogers.com writes: However, both the article and participle PARADOUS are singular and not
    Message 1 of 1 , Mar 9 6:53 AM
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      In a message dated 3/8/2004 8:10:56 PM Eastern Standard Time,
      tmcos@... writes:
      However, both the article and participle PARADOUS are singular and not
      plural. Is there any examples in the Greek New Testament where a singular
      substantive can refer to a group or a plural number of people?
      Tony:

      As I have noted earlier, *ho paradous* could possibly refer to God as a
      member of the "group of a plural number of people (see Rm. 8:32, where the subject
      of *paredoken* is God)," but the problem of sin makes the reference
      impossible. The term in 19:11 is deliberately ambiguous, and refers to all those
      complicit in the betrayal.

      The concept of *paradidomi* is, most neutrally stated, one of transference.
      The connotations are determined by context: while the term most often appears
      in contexts of betrayal, or handing over, it can also appear in more benign
      contexts, such as transferring, entrusting, yielding. It is interesting
      nonetheless that 19:11 is one of the few NT loci where *paradidomi* is used as a
      substantive (see *ho paradidous* in Mk.14:42;44 and Mt 26:46;48).

      Joe C.


      Joseph Calandrino, FAAFP
      Assistant Professor of Medicine
      University Hospital School of Medicine
      SUNY Stony Brook
      Stony Brook, NY


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