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Re: [John_Lit] Mary; the BD=Lazarus?

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  • jgbardis
    ... immediately ... 19:26, to ... Jesus? In her book A Separate God; The Origins and Teachings of Gnosticism (1984), Page 514, Simone Petrement suggests that
    Message 1 of 48 , Nov 14, 2003
      --- In johannine_literature@yahoogroups.com, "fmmccoy"
      <FMMCCOY@e...> wrote:


      > In this case, the mysterious and unnamed Beloved Disciple in the
      immediately
      > following 19:26 is most likely to be the just martyred James, the
      > brother of Jesus. Indeed, is not this BD explicitly said, in
      19:26, to
      > be a son of the mother of Jesus and, hence, to be a brother of
      Jesus?

      In her book "A Separate God; The Origins and Teachings of
      Gnosticism" (1984), Page 514, Simone Petrement suggests that the
      beloved disciple might be Lazarus. The beloved disciple, she argues,
      appears only after the resurrection of Lazarus. It is said and
      repeated that Christ loved Lazarus; and that is said of no other
      disciple. It would be very natural to think that someone raised from
      the dead would die no more.

      A further reason might be that his sister Mary, at least, would
      apparently fit right in in Jesus' family.

      John Bardis
      Atlanta, Ga.
    • geomelick@AOL.com
      Frank: F. C. Grant saw no problem in a combination of figurative and literal meanings in 1 Peter 5:13. In his article on Mark in the Encyclopedia Americana he
      Message 48 of 48 , Dec 4, 2003
        Frank:

        F. C. Grant saw no problem in a combination of figurative and literal
        meanings in 1 Peter 5:13. In his article on Mark in the Encyclopedia Americana he
        wrote: "Further, the intimate reference in 1 Peter, joining Mark's greeting
        with Peter's and those of the church in 'Babylon' (Rome?), would be more natural
        if the relationship was physical as well as spiritual." According to Swete,
        huios does not involve a spiritual relationship which in the Pauline Epistles
        is expressed by teknon.

        I have argued previously that Mark was forbidden by Jesus to accompany Peter
        during the Galilean ministry. This did not preclude him from being a disciple
        of John the Baptist. (Mathetes means learner or pupil.) J. E. Bruns wrote
        two articles about the confusion between John and John Mark. In one he quotes
        a document which claims Mark was with the servants at Cana. According to Mark
        6:31, the trip which ended in the feeding of the five thousand was supposed
        to be for a rest and there was no reason to make Mark stay home. Mark could
        have been present when his grandmother was healed, in the fishing boat, and with
        Peter when he went to Jerusalem for the Passover.

        Mark's limited contact with Jesus explains why we have just these relatively
        few stories about Jesus. There were many other things which Jesus did. Could
        John 21:24f be Mark's ending to his notes?

        George Melick, Drexel University (Retired)
        9 Attleboro Court
        Red Bank, NJ 07701
        http://georgemelick.tripod.com
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