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architriklinos once more

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  • Yuri Kuchinsky
    Greetings, friends, Some time ago, I expressed my doubt that the word architriklinos (Jn 2:8) was a very common Greek word, and was even used before its use in
    Message 1 of 1 , Jun 26 3:19 PM
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      Greetings, friends,

      Some time ago, I expressed my doubt that the word architriklinos (Jn 2:8)
      was a very common Greek word, and was even used before its use in the
      Fourth Gospel. In reply, Jeffrey Gibson objected that this word is in fact
      found in Heliodorus _Aethiopica_ 7.27.7, the citation that I previously
      missed.

      At the time, I failed to follow up this reference. But, more recently,
      I've looked into this author, and found out that he in fact wrote well
      after the time when the Fourth Gospel was written. As I understand it,
      nowadays scholars generally date Heliodorus to third or fourth century CE.
      And some even think that he was a Christian bishop in Thessaly!

      http://www.rarebooks.nd.edu/exhibits/durand/epic/heliodorus.html

      So it seems like we are still lacking any use of architriklinos in Greek
      before Jn was written.

      In my view, as I've already argued on this list, the original version of
      Jn 2:1-11 did not yet feature the figure of an architriklinos. I suggest
      that this term was introduced by a later editor, in the process of a major
      re-editing of the whole story. In the original text, rather than
      architriklinos, the story most likely featured "the master of the house",
      a figure with a significantly higher social standing. This is what the
      Diatessaronic texts indicate.

      A triclinium is generally believed to be a small dining area, with space
      perhaps for 6 people. So one wonders if the term archi-triklinos could be
      such a useful and meaningful term, even on the surface of it. At best, the
      job of being in charge of a triclinium should have been reserved for a
      rather lowly servant or slave. But this is not how this gentleman is
      portrayed in Jn.

      Also I've now looked up this word in the Thesaurus Linguae Latinae, but I
      didn't see it cited any time before the Fourth Gospel was written.

      So is there any indication at all that this word was common before Jn was
      written? What am I missing?

      My complete and updated analysis of this whole passage can be found here,

      4 versions of TURNING WATER INTO WINE
      http://www.styx.org/yuku/pepys/4vdt.htm

      Best wishes,

      Yuri.

      Yuri Kuchinsky -=O=- http://www.trends.ca/~yuku

      The goal proposed by Cynic philosophy is apathy, which is
      equivalent to becoming God -=O=- Julian
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