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[John_Lit] Re: Passover Themes in John 6

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  • ejdanna@trapdoor.aracnet.net
    ... I found it in William Lane s commentary on the Gospel of Mark [Eerdmans (Grand Rapids, 1974)] p.505, where he cites N. Glatzer ed., _The Passover
    Message 1 of 3 , Aug 27, 1999
      On Fri, 27 Aug 1999, odell mcguire wrote:

      > Elizabeth wrote:
      >
      > >I recently discovered that during the Passover meal the following words
      > were spoken over the unleavened bread: "This is the bread of affliction
      > which our fathers ate in the land of Egypt. Let everyone who hungers eat;
      > let everyone who is needy come and eat the Passover meal."<
      >
      > Do you have a reference for this piece of ritual?
      >
      I found it in William Lane's commentary on the Gospel of Mark [Eerdmans
      (Grand Rapids, 1974)] p.505, where he cites N. Glatzer ed., _The Passover
      Haggadah_, (New York, 1953) p. 20.

      Elizabeth Danna
    • David Rensberger
      Elizabeth, Just a word of caution on the Passover ritual. Immediately following the words Let everyone who hungers eat; let everyone who is needy come and
      Message 2 of 3 , Aug 27, 1999
        Elizabeth,

        Just a word of caution on the Passover ritual. Immediately following
        the words "Let everyone who hungers eat; let everyone who is needy come
        and eat the Passover meal," it says, "This year here; next year in the
        land of Israel. This year slaves; next year free people." This
        obviously expresses the hope of Jews in the Diaspora, and probably after
        the destruction of the Temple. It's always hard to know what in
        rabbinic texts really comes from as early as the first century, and what
        is much later. Given this context, it seems unlikely to me, or at least
        not proven without further evidence, that the words about coming and
        eating would have been in use at the time the Fourth Gospel was written,
        let alone at the time of Jesus.

        David
        --
        David Rensberger, Professor of New Testament
        Interdenominational Theological Center
        700 Martin Luther King, Jr. Drive, SW
        Atlanta, Georgia 30314-4143 USA
        Phone: 404-527-7749; fax: 404-527-0901; e-mail: drensberger@...
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