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RE: RE: RE: [John_Lit] Gerald Prince: The "Narratee" and John

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  • Staley, Jeffrey
    Gary writes: Booth and Chatman are strictly concerned with locutionary issues, if I can stretch Speech-Act theory in a metaphorical manner to speak of their
    Message 1 of 2 , Nov 29, 2001
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      Gary writes:

      Booth and Chatman are strictly concerned with locutionary issues, if I
      can stretch Speech-Act theory in a metaphorical manner to speak of their
      differences.

      Jeff Staley writes: Yes, I think you are on the right track here--though I
      think Booth's implied reader reaches over into illocutionary issues more so
      than Chatman's.

      The fact of the matter
      is, that
      the whole issue of the 'implied reader' is loaded with narratological
      debates on
      what happens while we read.

      Yeah, in my "Reading with a PAssion" I discard the term for "encoded
      reader," then discard that term for a critical autobiographical reader
      (myself).

      I am reminded of a moment of honesty by Stanley Fish in his book, Is There a
      Text in this Class?, when he asks; Who is the implied reader? And he
      answers, "Why, it is me!" Perhaps, he
      should have named it, "Is There A Fish in this Text"! Booth's implied
      reader is rhetorical concerns dressed up in narratological garb. Iser's
      implied reader is phenomenological concerns dressed up in narratological
      garb. Chatman's implied reader is Booth's, Genettes' and Prince's concerns
      dressed up in narratological garb.

      Nicely put, Gary.

      Competency is always, therefore, a hard thing to define
      and must remain open. It requires humility and honesty by the interpreter.

      Good point.

      So, how do these issues relate back to the Johannine reader's? How
      fictional or autobiographical do they end up to be?

      Jeff Staley
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