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[John_Lit] Re: Women in the Fourth Gospel

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  • Jeffrey L. Staley
    ... Another recent book that has not been mentioned yet is: Adeline Fehribach, The Women in the Life of the Bridegroom: A feminist historical-literary analysis
    Message 1 of 8 , Jul 24, 1999
      Kevin Quast wrote:

      > Hello everyone,
      >
      > my "assigned" topic is "women as witnesses in the Gospel of John." Any suggestions on how to approach this and where to go?
      >

      Another recent book that has not been mentioned yet is: Adeline Fehribach, The Women in the Life of the Bridegroom: A feminist
      historical-literary analysis of the female characters in the Fourth Gospel (Liturgical Press, 1998). This seems to be a lightly revised
      (1994/95?) doctoral dissertation done under the supervision of Mary Ann Tolbert, at Vanderbilt (?). In my book Reading with a Passion:
      Rhetoric, Autobiography and the American West in the Gospel of John (Continuum, 1995) I devote a chapter to a feminist reading of the
      "Lazarus story" (p. 54-84). For a slightly different take on the Samaritan woman, see Musa Dube's essay in a recent Semeia volume (I
      think it is the one on postcolonial interpretations of the Bible) I'll have to check out the exact reference, but I think it is in that
      Semeia volume.

      Jeff Staley
    • CStarWrk@aol.com
      This guy is important... He tends to lean a little further to the liberal side by suggesting that the reader s response is more important than the original
      Message 2 of 8 , Aug 1 5:29 PM
        This guy is important...

        He tends to lean a little further to the "liberal" side by suggesting that
        the reader's response is more important than the original author's intent.
        (I am uncomfortable with assertion).

        The above statement (thought I believe is true) is misleading.

        Staley's concern is about how the author is shaping the reader's impression
        through how the author/editor relates the story (and particularly how the
        author/editor relates the story through the implied narrator of the story).

        The other thing is the reality is that the reader's perception of that the
        passage is about is more important FOR THAT READER that what the author
        intended 2000+ years before.

        -C
      • N & RJ Hanscamp
        I m a little confused as to what was intended here. It seems to be referring to some message I did not get. Nigel (PS Could ya sign ya name -not initial
        Message 3 of 8 , Aug 1 5:56 PM
          I'm a little confused as to what was intended here. It seems to be
          referring to some message I did not get.

          Nigel

          (PS Could ya sign ya name -not initial -please)

          Nigel and Rebecca Hanscamp
          Trinity Methodist Theological College
          Auckland Consortium of Theological Education, New Zealand
          Email: nar.hanscamp@...


          >This guy is important...
          >
          >He tends to lean a little further to the "liberal" side by suggesting that
          >the reader's response is more important than the original author's intent.
          >(I am uncomfortable with assertion).
          >
          >The above statement (thought I believe is true) is misleading.
          >
          >Staley's concern is about how the author is shaping the reader's impression
          >through how the author/editor relates the story (and particularly how the
          >author/editor relates the story through the implied narrator of the story).
          >
          >The other thing is the reality is that the reader's perception of that the
          >passage is about is more important FOR THAT READER that what the author
          >intended 2000+ years before.
          >
          >-C
          >
          >------------------------------------------------------------------------
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          >
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        • Paul Anderson
          On the treatment of women in John, you might add appendices at the ends of Ray Brown s _The Community of the Beloved Disciple_ and Bob Kysar s _The Maverick
          Message 4 of 8 , Aug 6 5:12 PM
            On the treatment of women in John, you might add appendices at the ends of
            Ray Brown's _The Community of the Beloved Disciple_ and Bob Kysar's _The
            Maverick Gospel_ (2nd ed).

            Paul Anderson



            On Sat, 24 Jul 1999, Jeffrey L. Staley wrote:

            >
            >
            > Kevin Quast wrote:
            >
            > > Hello everyone,
            > >
            > > my "assigned" topic is "women as witnesses in the Gospel of John." Any suggestions on how to approach this and where to go?
            > >
            >
            > Another recent book that has not been mentioned yet is: Adeline Fehribach, The Women in the Life of the Bridegroom: A feminist
            > historical-literary analysis of the female characters in the Fourth Gospel (Liturgical Press, 1998). This seems to be a lightly revised
            > (1994/95?) doctoral dissertation done under the supervision of Mary Ann Tolbert, at Vanderbilt (?). In my book Reading with a Passion:
            > Rhetoric, Autobiography and the American West in the Gospel of John (Continuum, 1995) I devote a chapter to a feminist reading of the
            > "Lazarus story" (p. 54-84). For a slightly different take on the Samaritan woman, see Musa Dube's essay in a recent Semeia volume (I
            > think it is the one on postcolonial interpretations of the Bible) I'll have to check out the exact reference, but I think it is in that
            > Semeia volume.
            >
            > Jeff Staley
            >
            >
            > ------------------------------------------------------------------------
            > Subscribe: send e-mail briefly describing your academic background & research interests to johannine_literature-subscribe@egroups.com
            > Unsubscribe: e-mail johannine_literature-unsubscribe@egroups.com
            > Contact list managers: e-mail johannine_literature-owner@egroups.com
            >
            >
          • Jon R. Venema
            ... suggestions on how to approach this and where to go? It seems a basic or necessary question addressed has been: Why women were prominent in Gosepl of John?
            Message 5 of 8 , Aug 7 7:46 AM
              > Kevin Quast wrote:
              >
              > Hello everyone,
              >
              > my "assigned" topic is "women as witnesses in the Gospel of John." Any
              suggestions on how to approach this and where to go?

              It seems a basic or necessary question addressed has been:
              Why women were prominent in Gosepl of John?
              Three general answers:
              1. Addressing the Community
              2. Addressing outsiders
              3. Speaking against other communities

              R. Brown (#3):
              A. Y. Collins (#1-2): Relationships within Johannine community
              characterized by mutuality
              R. Karris (#2): Invitation to women to enter the community
              S. Schneiders (#1): Males in Johannine Community reluctant to recognize
              women
              Schüssler-Fiorenza (#3):

              The topic "women as witnesses in the Gospel of John" would certainly be
              shaped
              by perspectives such as these.

              Jon R. Venema
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