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Re: [John_Lit] Last Supper

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  • John Lupia
    To: James McGrath Regarding Pesach Eve Seder in Mishnaic and Talmudic Literature: Our understanding of the Pesach Eve (Erev) Seder comes largely from the
    Message 1 of 19 , Jul 8, 2001
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      To: "James McGrath"
      Regarding Pesach Eve Seder in Mishnaic and Talmudic Literature:

      Our understanding of the Pesach Eve (Erev) Seder comes largely from the
      writings of the Mishnaic & Jerusalem Talmud Tractate Pesahim, and the Gospel
      of John itself.


      Passover Eve

      Before the common meal on Passover eve, the day was filled with preperation
      for the even. A full contingent of priests -- twenty-four divisions instead
      of the usual one--came early to the Temple. Their first task was the
      burning of the hametz, "leven," which had been searched for by candlelight
      in each home the night before and then removed for burning the next morning
      (Mishnah, Pesahim 1-3). By midday all work stopped. The afternoon was set
      aside for the slaughtering of the lamb. The offering of the passover
      sacrifice at the Temple began about 3:00pm. (Pesahim 5:1) and was conducted
      in three massive shifts. When the temple courts was filled with the first
      group of offerers, the gates of the court were closed. The rams horn was
      sounded and the sacrifice began (Pesahim5:5). Each Jew slaughtered his own
      lamb. The priests stood in two rows, one holding a gold basins and the
      other silver. After the blood was drained into the basin, it was tossed
      against the base of the altar (Pesahim 5:6). While the offerings were going
      on, the Levites sang the Hallel (Pss 113-118). Each lamb was then skinned
      and its fat with kidneys removerd for burning on the alter (Pesahim 5:9-10;
      cf. Lev 3:3-5). Before leaving the temple each offerer slung his lamb --
      wrapped in its own hide over his shoulder (Babylonian Talmud, Peshahim 65b).
      He then departed with his company to prepare the passover meal.
      Immediately, the next division of offerers filed into the Temple court and
      the ritual was repeated. (cf. also Pesahim 66a & Jerusalem Talmud Pesahim
      6:1)


      Mishnah (Pesahim 4:1) "it is a positive commandment for each Jew to drink
      four cups of wine on Passover eve, and even the poorest Jew must not receive
      less than four cups of wine." Number four, four cups, have special
      significance, given in many variations: four cups of wine, four questions,
      four sons, four special symbolic foods to be eaten - the paschal sacrifice,
      the matza, the bitter herb and the haroset.

      For additional bibliographic references see:

      Wolf Heidenheim, Passover Eve (Roedelheim, 1822-23)

      Harold Hoehner, “Chronological Aspects of the Life of Christ,” Zondervan,
      1977).

      Rylands Hebrew MS 6 (Catalonian c. 1350) A Haggadah, or service book used
      at the Seder on Passover eve.

      Baruch Bokser, Origins of the Seder, (Univ. of Calif. Press) [o.p.]

      E. Daniel Goldschmidt, The Passover Haggadah: Its Sources and History (Mosad
      Bialik: Jerusalem, 1977) & additional readings tba; primary rabbinic
      sources.

      Yosef Hayim, Haggadah and history : a panorama in facsimile of five
      centuries of the printed Haggadah from the collections of Harvard University
      and the Jewish Theological Seminary of America [Philadelphia : Jewish
      Publication Society of America, 1976].

      Joseph Tabory, "The Passover eve ceremony : an historical survey " Immanuel
      No 12 (Spr 1981), p. 32-43.

      S. Stein, "The Influence of Symposia Literature on the Literary Form of the
      Pesach Haggadah" JJS 8 (1957), pp. 13-44

      Lawrence Hoffman, "A Symbol of Salvation in the Passover Seder" Passover and
      Easter: The Symbolic Structuing of Sacred Seasons [Two Liturgical
      Traditions, vol. 6] Notre Dame, Ind. Notre Dame Unversity Press, 1999

      Jakob J. Petuchowski, "Do this in remembrance of me' (1 Cor 11:24)" Journal
      of Biblical Literature 76 (D 1957), p. 293-298.

      Baruch M Bokser, "Was the Last Supper a Passover Seder?" Bible Review 3,2
      (1987) 24-33.

      Giuseppe Ghiberti," Jesus’ Passover Meal "SIDIC XXX:1 [1997], 8 12.


      Cordially in Christ,
      John
      <><


      John N. Lupia
      501 North Avenue B-1
      Elizabeth, New Jersey 07208-1731 USA
      JLupia2@...
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      "during this important time, as the eve of the new millennium approaches . .
      . unity among all Christians of the various confessions will increase until
      they reach full communion." John Paul II, Tertio Millennio Adveniente, 16





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    • James McGrath
      John, Thanks for your message. I think my confusion was due to the difference between the modern of way of reckoning days and the traditional Jewish one. The
      Message 2 of 19 , Jul 9, 2001
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        John,

        Thanks for your message. I think my confusion was due
        to the difference between the 'modern' of way of
        reckoning days and the traditional Jewish one. The
        meal on what we would call 'Passover Eve' (i.e. the
        day before Passover, after sundown) would in fact have
        been part of Passover day according to Jewish
        reckoning.

        Could this tie John together with Paul? If the
        Passover lambs were slain 'on the Eve of the
        Passover', then Paul may well have been aware of the
        same dating for Jesus' death as John suggests and as
        the rabbinic literature records. Would it then be
        conceivable that Mark could have been preserving a
        traditional association with Passover without having
        the same Jewish background to understand the
        chronology of the events linked to Passover?

        Thank you for helping shed another glimmer of light on
        a perplexing issue!

        Best wishes,

        James McGrath







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      • John Lupia
        To James McGrath You re very welcome James. Luke 22,7; Joh 13,1; Matth 26,17; Mark 14,12 all say the same thing as I explained about Passover Eve. This was
        Message 3 of 19 , Jul 9, 2001
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          To James McGrath

          You're very welcome James.

          Luke 22,7; Joh 13,1; Matth 26,17; Mark 14,12 all say the same thing as I
          explained about Passover Eve. This was their way of expressing this
          according to the cultural idiom.

          Cordially in Christ,
          John
          <><

          John N. Lupia
          501 North Avenue B-1
          Elizabeth, New Jersey 07208-1731 USA
          JLupia2@...
          <>< ~~~ <>< ~~~ <>< ~~~ ><> ~~~ ><> ~~~ ><>
          "during this important time, as the eve of the new millennium approaches . .
          . unity among all Christians of the various confessions will increase until
          they reach full communion." John Paul II, Tertio Millennio Adveniente, 16





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        • Yuri Kuchinsky
          ... recorded history have held this view of John s chronology and used leavened bread asour Eucharist for this reason.
          Message 4 of 19 , Jul 10, 2001
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            Steve Puluka wrote:

            >> I would note again, that the Eastern Churches from the earliest
            recorded history have held this view of John's chronology and used
            leavened bread asour Eucharist for this reason. <<

            And on Sat Jul 7, 2001, John Lupia replied in,

            http://groups.yahoo.com/group/johannine_literature/message/1770

            >> The Catholic-Orthodox tradition is Johannine. John Paul II
            concelebrated this liturgy in Ukraine a few eeks ago partaking of the
            eucharistic using this "matter" and "form". It is OUR tradition. <<

            John,

            It's clear that Jn is a quartodeciman gospel. The differences with the
            Synoptic chronology have never been resolved satisfactorily.

            True, in recent centuries, Rome has adopted the Eastern Orthodox
            liturgical tradition alongside its own rather different Western tradition.
            But, still, the historical differences between these two traditions should
            not be minimised. In particular there seems to be a certain contradiction
            between Jesus, according to Jn, being the Passover Lamb, killed at the
            same hour when Passover lambs were sacrificed in Jerusalem, and Jesus
            partaking of the Passover lamb.

            Best wishes,

            Yuri.

            Yuri Kuchinsky in Toronto -=O=- http://www.trends.ca/~yuku

            It is a far, far better thing to have a firm anchor in nonsense than
            to put out on the troubled seas of thought -=O=- John K. Galbraith
          • John Lupia
            ... I assume you mean St. John s Gospel represents Passover falling on Nisan 14. Passover did fall on Friday Nisan 14, which means that the Pesach Eve Seder
            Message 5 of 19 , Jul 10, 2001
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              Yuri Kushinsky wrote:

              >It's clear that Jn is a quartodeciman gospel.


              I assume you mean St. John's Gospel represents Passover falling on Nisan 14.
              Passover did fall on Friday Nisan 14, which means that the Pesach Eve Seder
              (Last Supper) was celebrated on Thursday Nisan 13.

              >The differences with the Synoptic chronology have never been resolved
              >satisfactorily.

              This is only a problem with those researches that have not, IMHO, properly
              understood the chronology of the Synoptic tradition having a conformity and
              consistency with St. John. This is unfortunate and indeed creates confusion
              and division. However if you examine the Synoptics you will find that they
              all agree with St. John and the Last Supper fell on Thursday Nisan 13, the
              Pesach Eve Seder. This understanding forms the basis of the teaching found
              in The Catechism of the Catholic Church, 1333 "Faithful to the Lord's
              command the Church continues to do so, in his memory until his glorious
              return, what he did on the eve of his Passion: "He took bread . . ." "He
              took the cup filled with wine . . .'. Note that the Last Supper is the
              "eve" of Jesus' Passion which fell on Passover as stated in 1096 "For
              Christians, it is the Passover fulfilled in the death and resurrection of
              Christ". Now since the Catholic Church officially teaches Christ was
              crucified on Passover (Friday Nisan 14), and all four Gospels relate how the
              Last Supper was the previous evening it only stands to logic and reason that
              it was on Thursday Nisan 13 "the Pesach Eve (Erev) Seder". Even if one were
              to find alternate interpretations they would still have to agree that this
              above chronology as I understand it and as held by the Catholic Church is
              indeed possible. So, if it is possible why look for disconcordance where
              there is none?


              >True, in recent centuries, Rome has adopted the Eastern Orthodox
              >liturgical tradition alongside its own rather different Western tradition.

              >But, still, the historical differences between these two traditions should
              >not be minimised.


              The Eastern Orthodox liturgical tradition is Catholic in every respect and
              is part of the Catholic tradition. This is not a recent development. I
              suggest you research this issue. I think what you are confusing is the
              different liturgical rites within the Church. The Roman Rite uses
              unleavened bread, whereas numerous Oriental Rites all use leaven bread. All
              of these are Catholic traditions and conform to the official doctrine on the
              Eucharist.


              >In particular there seems to be a certain contradiction
              >between Jesus, according to Jn, being the Passover Lamb, killed at the
              >same hour when Passover lambs were sacrificed in Jerusalem, and Jesus
              >partaking of the Passover lamb.


              Please elaborate on this.


              Cordially in Christ,
              John
              <><

              John N. Lupia
              501 North Avenue B-1
              Elizabeth, New Jersey 07208-1731 USA
              JLupia2@...
              <>< ~~~ <>< ~~~ <>< ~~~ ><> ~~~ ><> ~~~ ><>
              "during this important time, as the eve of the new millennium approaches . .
              . unity among all Christians of the various confessions will increase until
              they reach full communion." John Paul II, Tertio Millennio Adveniente, 16





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            • Yuri Kuchinsky
              ... Well, John, this is the problem as I see it. According to Jn, Jesus is already arrested before the Passover meal has taken place. But according to the
              Message 6 of 19 , Jul 11, 2001
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                On Tue, 10 Jul 2001, John Lupia wrote:
                > Yuri Kushinsky wrote:

                > >But, still, the historical differences between these two traditions should
                > >not be minimised.
                >
                > The Eastern Orthodox liturgical tradition is Catholic in every respect
                > and is part of the Catholic tradition. This is not a recent
                > development. I suggest you research this issue. I think what you are
                > confusing is the different liturgical rites within the Church. The
                > Roman Rite uses unleavened bread, whereas numerous Oriental Rites all
                > use leaven bread. All of these are Catholic traditions and conform to
                > the official doctrine on the Eucharist.

                Well, John, this is the problem as I see it. According to Jn, Jesus is
                already arrested before the Passover meal has taken place. But according
                to the Synoptic chronology, Jesus eats the Passover meal.

                As you correctly point out, the Roman Rite uses unleavened bread, whereas
                numerous Oriental Rites use leavened bread. Why this difference? In my
                view, the difference arose because the Oriental Rites seem to assume that
                the Last Supper was not a Passover meal.

                > >In particular there seems to be a certain contradiction
                > >between Jesus, according to Jn, being the Passover Lamb, killed at the
                > >same hour when Passover lambs were sacrificed in Jerusalem, and Jesus
                > >partaking of the Passover lamb.
                >
                > Please elaborate on this.

                See above.

                As to your question about the genealogies, these are two extended passages
                from Mt and Lk that, to my mind, give clear evidence of this material
                being later than AD 50. (Although, this subject is probably off-topic on
                John_Lit-L.)

                Best regards,

                Yuri.

                Yuri Kuchinsky -=O=- http://www.trends.ca/~yuku

                Whenever you find that you are on the side of the majority,
                it is time to reform -=O=- Mark Twain
              • Thomas W Butler
                Dear Steve, Sorry it has taken so long for me to reply to your last message. Your point is well taken that the Last Supper is not specifically identified in
                Message 7 of 19 , Aug 9, 2001
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                  Dear Steve,
                  Sorry it has taken so long for me to reply to your last message.
                  Your point is well taken that the Last Supper is not specifically
                  identified in the FG. You note, however, that the symbols that
                  are clearly associated with it DO appear in the text. I submit that
                  the symbolism is so consistent and clear that the writer(s) were
                  assuming that the readers were already familiar with the tradition
                  and would get the point. The stories of the annointing and the
                  footwashing in chapters 12 and 13 are clearly set within the context
                  of the last supper, even though the FG does not describe that meal
                  in detail.

                  Yours in Christ's service,
                  Tom Butler

                  On Sat, 7 Jul 2001 07:01:12 -0400 "Steve Puluka" <spuluka@...>
                  writes:
                  > ----- Original Message -----
                  > From: "Thomas W Butler" <butlerfam5@...>
                  > > However, within the context of the narrative world of the
                  > > Gospel of John, the symbolic meaning that is the theological
                  > > foundation for the Passover meal can be found in the material
                  > > associated with the meal that Jesus shared with his disciples
                  > > on the night in which he was betrayed. The meal may not have
                  > > been the Passover, strictly interpreted, but the meanings of
                  > > that meal and all that Jesus is reported to have communicated
                  > > in that context is a re-constitution of the Mosaic theology
                  > > of the Passover.
                  > ---------------------------------------------------------------
                  > Dear Thomas,
                  >
                  > I would quibble with this interpretation. In reading John's
                  > narrative on
                  > the night that Jesus was betrayed I am struck by the LACK OF A MEAL.
                  > There
                  > is no food mentioned, other than Judas tipping his hand. Rather, I
                  > see that
                  > the Eucharistic symbolism we find in the synoptic tradition has been
                  > moved
                  > to points earlier in John's Gospel, the bread and the fish for
                  > example.
                  >
                  > I think that we are so familiar with the synoptic picture of that
                  > meal that
                  > we transfer the image to John's story, when it is not there.
                  >
                  > Steve Puluka
                  > Cantor Holy Ghost Byzantine Catholic Church
                  > Mckees Rocks PA
                  >
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