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RE: [John_Lit] Aquinas, Friendship, John

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  • Michael Willett Newheart
    The book that James is referring to, Wisdom s Friends: Community and Christology in the Fourth Gospel, is by Sharon Ringe. It was published by Westminster John
    Message 1 of 4 , Mar 1 1:52 PM
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      The book that James is referring to, Wisdom's Friends: Community and
      Christology in the Fourth Gospel, is by Sharon Ringe. It was published by
      Westminster John Knox in 1999. I am currently using as a required text in
      my Gospel of John class here at Howard Divinity. I have found it quite
      useful, as have my students. In her chapter 5, "Appointed to Be Friends,"
      Ringe considers friendship in John (esp. 15:1-17), hellenistic philosophy
      and the Hebrew Bible.

      I hope this is helpful.

      Peace,
      Michael Willett Newheart

      -----Original Message-----
      From: James McGrath [SMTP:jamesfrankmcgrath@...]
      Sent: Wednesday, February 28, 2001 10:06 AM
      To: johannine_literature@yahoogroups.com
      Subject: [John_Lit] Aquinas, Friendship, John

      There may not be any link with Aquinas, but there is
      certainly a recent book on friendship and John
      entitled _Wisdom's Friends_. I don't have the author
      and other details with me at the moment - if you can't
      find it please get back to me.

      I haven't read it yet so I can't comment on its
      usefulness.

      James






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      -----------------------------------------------------
      Dr. James McGrath
      Universitatea Emanuel
      Nufarului 87, Oradea 3700, Romania
      E-mail: jamesfrankmcgrath@...
      Web page: http://www.geocities.com/jamesfrankmcgrath
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    • Horace Jeffery Hodges
      I hope that I m not jumping the gun by posting already. The time is Sunday evening here in Korea, but I will be away from my computer until Wednesday (I
      Message 2 of 4 , Mar 4 12:56 AM
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        I hope that I'm not jumping the gun by posting
        already. The time is Sunday evening here in Korea, but
        I will be away from my computer until Wednesday (I
        think), and I wanted to be involved in the discussion.

        Professor Hakola states:

        -------------------------------------------------------
        It is interesting also that earlier rabbinic
        traditions represented in the Mishnah do not mention
        any idolatry among the Samaritans.[30] It seems,
        therefore, that the implicit reference of the
        Johannine Jesus to idolatrous tendencies among the
        Samaritans is based more on a reading of 2 Kgs
        17:24–41 than on the religion of the Samaritans
        in the first century CE.
        -------------------------------------------------------

        My response is this: Perhaps the Johannince Jesus's
        reference to the Samaritans' ignorance of what they
        worship reflects less a critique of (nonexistent)
        idolatry and more an awareness that the Samaritans
        adhered only to the Pentateuch, rejecting the prophets
        and the writings. Of course, this wouldn't explain the
        "implicit reference . . . 2 Kgs 17:24-41" (but is this
        reference so certain?). Well, this is a minor point
        that I'm making . . . I think.

        In his conclusion, Professor Hakola quotes Graham
        Harvey:

        -------------------------------------------------------
        Graham Harvey has aptly written:

        The 'Jewish' Jesus is part of the Evangelist��s
        message precisely because it showed just how bad the
        Jews really were, it deepened their culpability. The
        Jews ought to have been, according to these texts, the
        primary followers of Jesus; instead they are the worst
        opponents. �� The obvious historical point, that the
        writers and the first Christians themselves were all
        Jewish, is irrelevant in these books. Jewish responses
        to Jesus are made worse not better because he was
        Jewish.[54]
        -------------------------------------------------------

        My view is that this statement by Harvey goes too far
        (though I don't know that this matters much to
        Professor Hakola's general argument). I cannot see how
        the Jewishness of the first Christians is irrelevant
        to the issue in John. It cannot be irrelevant because
        the ambiguity of the term "Jew" even in John's Gospel
        forces the reader (at the very least) to qualify the
        term's meaning according to the context.

        However, I think that the statement does capture a
        central theme in John's Gospel, namely, that those who
        (should) know are more culpable than those who do not
        know. This theme is explicit in John 9:40-41, where
        the Johannine Jesus tells those Pharisees who were
        with him that if they had been (spiritually) blind,
        then they would not be guilty but because they claim
        to see (and, presumably, should be able to see), they
        are guilty.

        This also fits with I John 2:18ff, which condemns as
        "antichrists" those who have left the Johannine
        community. See also 2 John 7ff, for a similar
        condemnation of those who have left the community.

        So, there is greater culpability for some according to
        the Johannine writings -- but this appears to be a
        culpability based upon one's epistemological situation
        rather than upon one's identity (except in the broad
        sense of being identified either with God or the
        devil).

        Anyway, thanks to Professor Hakola for a stimulating
        article -- well-written and thoughtful. I look forward
        to reading what others have to say.

        Jeffery Hodges

        =====
        Professor Horace Jeffery Hodges
        Department of English Language and Literature
        Hanshin University
        447-791 Kyunggido Osan-City
        Yangsandong 411
        South Korea

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