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Re: Earth's electric field

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  • Michael Couch
    Robert: This is a little to crytic to decipher. Can you spare a few more words and make it clearer what you did with the audio frequencies? Michael couch
    Message 1 of 25 , May 5, 2011
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      Robert:

      This is a little to crytic to decipher. Can you spare a few more words and make it clearer what you did with the audio frequencies?

      Michael couch

      --- In joecellfreeenergydevice@yahoogroups.com, "Robert" <robert_hull2001@...> wrote:
      >
      > James G,
      > Thanx for the reply.
      > as the man touches the grounding screw in part...
      > never touched the bulb part...
      > audio frequencies...white noise...
      > become the enhancing motive force...
      > that greatly reduces the current (amps) required...
      > or in the scenario...
      > with a filament still intact...
      > the filament...never heats up to correct temperature.
      > This is simple to test and verify...with a laser thermometer...
      > IMHO...this methodolgy of dimming the light would have extended the projected life expectancy by hundreds of hours...
      > and never required to be turned off totally...
      > so the shock of startup and stop...when most of the deterioration of the filaments occurs...
      > The copper wires installed...
      >
      > It is also exciting/disturbing' stratifying the gases...in a cricular pattern...
      > the eddy effect...of extremly low guass level magnetizim...
      >
      > that allows the arcing action between the filaments...to occur...even though not in a perfectly straight line...
      > that is the exact reason for the positioning of the copper wires.
      >
      > This is in the details...not printed out...in those articles...
      > that we now have a greater understanding of ways to generate..
      > and use audio signals...that are not ultrasonic or supersonic...
      > They were never measured correctly.
      >
      > I did something...using 12V DC...18 guage multi-strand copper
      > wiring...good qaulity speaker wire...
      > battery to battery transfer...
      > to ensure no known incoming pulses... or stray frequencies...
      > added low Hz audio signal...
      > the heat load on the wire was significantly reduced..
      > the time to transfer load..was significantly reduced...
      > just to prove to myself...that it is true.
      > total task power consumption was markedly less...
      > included power for generating audio signal...
      >
      > That really surprised me...impressed me...enough to make this post.
      > the use of higher frequenices do have their place...
      > but now I am not so sure as to need for the the basic transfer of
      > DC electrical energy.
      > it only appered to be a cost redundant item...
      > Go Figure !!!
      >
      > Robert
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      > --- In joecellfreeenergydevice@yahoogroups.com, "jgosscacc1" <jgosscacc@> wrote:
      > >
      > > Hello Robert,
      > >
      > > Yes, the energy from Tesla coils can produce rather high frequency values. Out of the many coils I've built in the past, resonant frequency ranged from 46 Khz to 800 Khz.
      > > The 46 Khz coil was a monster size coil while the 800 Khz coil was a miniature size. Energy leaving the loading terminal atop a Tesla coil seeks earth ground reference, due to the other end of the high voltage stack being referenced to earth. Tesla coils basically arc to anything in the vicinity because most everything has an earth ground reference. Frequencies in this range will pass through most all well known insulators designed for 60 Hz frequency.
      > >
      > > With smaller size Tesla coils it's relatively safe to touch the high frequency energy they generate. With a metal object in hand there's very little if any sensation of electric shock. Without the metal in hand it may feel like a prick from a needle. However, as coil size gets bigger, shock sensations begins to become irritating, and with larger coils its down right painful to endure. As coil size moves on up in power capability they become lethal.
      > >
      > > While using a relatively low power Tesla coil, the gas inside a standard light bulb can be made to ionize and produce light, with or without a filament. Light generated is relatively low in value. The small wire around the bulb you referred to is in reference to a Tesla coil output. When someone makes contact to the base of the bulb, this brings an improved earth ground reference to the bulb and the gas ionizes. Some bulbs are better than others depending on type of gas mixture inside.
      > >
      > > If coil output is strong enough a bulb will ionize without someone touching it by simply being in the electric field of the coil. Demonstrations such as this was the predecessor to the modern day plasma glob. For my electrical show I build what I called a flat plasma screen. It measured 24 inches square, with two glass sheets separated by only 1/8 inch. Argon gas continuely passed between the sandwiched plates at atmospheric pressure. When high frequency energy was applied to an electrode in the center of the screen, a magnificent plasma display was generated, argon produces a white light. I also determined that an enclosed volume of normal air reduced below atmospheric pressure by the correct amount will indeed glow when excited by high frequency.
      > >
      > > Our modern day fluorescent lighting systems are a direct spin off from Tesla's high frequency experiments.
      > >
      > > Thanks,
      > > James Goss
      > >
      >
    • jgosscacc1
      Hello Michael, What is your take on why the air has to be reduced pressure? Why doesn t it work at Atmospheric pressure too? I believe you re in reference to
      Message 2 of 25 , May 5, 2011
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        Hello Michael,

        "What is your take on why the air has to be reduced pressure? Why doesn't it work at Atmospheric pressure too?"

        I believe you're in reference to this statement: I also determined that an enclosed volume of normal air reduced below atmospheric pressure by the correct amount will indeed glow when excited by high frequency.

        I believe its because at normal atmospheric pressure, as well as above atmospheric pressure, ionization is restricted due to atoms contained in the air mixture being compacted, or compressed together. Compressed together means that electrons traveling between the atoms have short transit times before they collide with other atoms.

        As pressure is lowered, atoms are allowed to space themselves greater distances apart within the gas. Greater distance means the electrons now have longer transit times and can gain more energy before they collide with other atoms. Though fewer atoms are now involved, the collisions yield greater numbers of dislodged electrons overall, due to the gained energies.

        If pressure is lowered too much there's not enough atoms remaining to support ionization, resulting in no glowing at all.

        Thanks,
        James
      • Robert
        Micheal, No...very safe to play with... if that post confuses you too much... you should not play with it. Robert
        Message 3 of 25 , May 6, 2011
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          Micheal,
          No...very safe to play with...
          if that post confuses you too much...
          you should not play with it.

          Robert





          --- In joecellfreeenergydevice@yahoogroups.com, "Michael Couch" <cmichaelcouch@...> wrote:
          >
          > Robert:
          >
          > This is a little to crytic to decipher. Can you spare a few more words and make it clearer what you did with the audio frequencies?
          >
          > Michael couch
          >
          > --- In joecellfreeenergydevice@yahoogroups.com, "Robert" <robert_hull2001@> wrote:
          > >
          > > James G,
          > > Thanx for the reply.
          > > as the man touches the grounding screw in part...
          > > never touched the bulb part...
          > > audio frequencies...white noise...
          > > become the enhancing motive force...
          > > that greatly reduces the current (amps) required...
          > > or in the scenario...
          > > with a filament still intact...
          > > the filament...never heats up to correct temperature.
          > > This is simple to test and verify...with a laser thermometer...
          > > IMHO...this methodolgy of dimming the light would have extended the projected life expectancy by hundreds of hours...
          > > and never required to be turned off totally...
          > > so the shock of startup and stop...when most of the deterioration of the filaments occurs...
          > > The copper wires installed...
          > >
          > > It is also exciting/disturbing' stratifying the gases...in a cricular pattern...
          > > the eddy effect...of extremly low guass level magnetizim...
          > >
          > > that allows the arcing action between the filaments...to occur...even though not in a perfectly straight line...
          > > that is the exact reason for the positioning of the copper wires.
          > >
          > > This is in the details...not printed out...in those articles...
          > > that we now have a greater understanding of ways to generate..
          > > and use audio signals...that are not ultrasonic or supersonic...
          > > They were never measured correctly.
          > >
          > > I did something...using 12V DC...18 guage multi-strand copper
          > > wiring...good qaulity speaker wire...
          > > battery to battery transfer...
          > > to ensure no known incoming pulses... or stray frequencies...
          > > added low Hz audio signal...
          > > the heat load on the wire was significantly reduced..
          > > the time to transfer load..was significantly reduced...
          > > just to prove to myself...that it is true.
          > > total task power consumption was markedly less...
          > > included power for generating audio signal...
          > >
          > > That really surprised me...impressed me...enough to make this post.
          > > the use of higher frequenices do have their place...
          > > but now I am not so sure as to need for the the basic transfer of
          > > DC electrical energy.
          > > it only appered to be a cost redundant item...
          > > Go Figure !!!
          > >
          > > Robert
          > >
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          > >
          > > --- In joecellfreeenergydevice@yahoogroups.com, "jgosscacc1" <jgosscacc@> wrote:
          > > >
          > > > Hello Robert,
          > > >
          > > > Yes, the energy from Tesla coils can produce rather high frequency values. Out of the many coils I've built in the past, resonant frequency ranged from 46 Khz to 800 Khz.
          > > > The 46 Khz coil was a monster size coil while the 800 Khz coil was a miniature size. Energy leaving the loading terminal atop a Tesla coil seeks earth ground reference, due to the other end of the high voltage stack being referenced to earth. Tesla coils basically arc to anything in the vicinity because most everything has an earth ground reference. Frequencies in this range will pass through most all well known insulators designed for 60 Hz frequency.
          > > >
          > > > With smaller size Tesla coils it's relatively safe to touch the high frequency energy they generate. With a metal object in hand there's very little if any sensation of electric shock. Without the metal in hand it may feel like a prick from a needle. However, as coil size gets bigger, shock sensations begins to become irritating, and with larger coils its down right painful to endure. As coil size moves on up in power capability they become lethal.
          > > >
          > > > While using a relatively low power Tesla coil, the gas inside a standard light bulb can be made to ionize and produce light, with or without a filament. Light generated is relatively low in value. The small wire around the bulb you referred to is in reference to a Tesla coil output. When someone makes contact to the base of the bulb, this brings an improved earth ground reference to the bulb and the gas ionizes. Some bulbs are better than others depending on type of gas mixture inside.
          > > >
          > > > If coil output is strong enough a bulb will ionize without someone touching it by simply being in the electric field of the coil. Demonstrations such as this was the predecessor to the modern day plasma glob. For my electrical show I build what I called a flat plasma screen. It measured 24 inches square, with two glass sheets separated by only 1/8 inch. Argon gas continuely passed between the sandwiched plates at atmospheric pressure. When high frequency energy was applied to an electrode in the center of the screen, a magnificent plasma display was generated, argon produces a white light. I also determined that an enclosed volume of normal air reduced below atmospheric pressure by the correct amount will indeed glow when excited by high frequency.
          > > >
          > > > Our modern day fluorescent lighting systems are a direct spin off from Tesla's high frequency experiments.
          > > >
          > > > Thanks,
          > > > James Goss
          > > >
          > >
          >
        • Huuman
          *So James: What is the preferred method of measuring a static electrical charge? Jim*
          Message 4 of 25 , May 6, 2011
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            So James:

            What is the preferred method of measuring a static electrical charge?

            Jim


            On 5/4/2011 9:13 AM, jgosscacc1 wrote:
             

            Hello Robert,

            Yes, the energy from Tesla coils can produce rather high frequency values. Out of the many coils I've built in the past, resonant frequency ranged from 46 Khz to 800 Khz.
            The 46 Khz coil was a monster size coil while the 800 Khz coil was a miniature size. Energy leaving the loading terminal atop a Tesla coil seeks earth ground reference, due to the other end of the high voltage stack being referenced to earth. Tesla coils basically arc to anything in the vicinity because most everything has an earth ground reference. Frequencies in this range will pass through most all well known insulators designed for 60 Hz frequency.

            With smaller size Tesla coils it's relatively safe to touch the high frequency energy they generate. With a metal object in hand there's very little if any sensation of electric shock. Without the metal in hand it may feel like a prick from a needle. However, as coil size gets bigger, shock sensations begins to become irritating, and with larger coils its down right painful to endure. As coil size moves on up in power capability they become lethal.

            While using a relatively low power Tesla coil, the gas inside a standard light bulb can be made to ionize and produce light, with or without a filament. Light generated is relatively low in value. The small wire around the bulb you referred to is in reference to a Tesla coil output. When someone makes contact to the base of the bulb, this brings an improved earth ground reference to the bulb and the gas ionizes. Some bulbs are better than others depending on type of gas mixture inside.

            If coil output is strong enough a bulb will ionize without someone touching it by simply being in the electric field of the coil. Demonstrations such as this was the predecessor to the modern day plasma glob. For my electrical show I build what I called a flat plasma screen. It measured 24 inches square, with two glass sheets separated by only 1/8 inch. Argon gas continuely passed between the sandwiched plates at atmospheric pressure. When high frequency energy was applied to an electrode in the center of the screen, a magnificent plasma display was generated, argon produces a white light. I also determined that an enclosed volume of normal air reduced below atmospheric pressure by the correct amount will indeed glow when excited by high frequency.

            Our modern day fluorescent lighting systems are a direct spin off from Tesla's high frequency experiments.

            Thanks,
            James Goss


          • jgosscacc1
            Jim ask: What is the preferred method of measuring a static electrical charge? Hello Jim, A surface dc voltmeter is probably the most accurate. It measures
            Message 5 of 25 , May 6, 2011
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              Jim ask: "What is the preferred method of measuring a static electrical charge?"

              Hello Jim,

              A surface dc voltmeter is probably the most accurate. It measures static charge of an object, metal or nonmetal, without actually touching the surface of the object. This is good because taking a sample of the charge value doesn't dissipate the stored charge on the object under test. This meter is typically held about one inch from the surface being tested and samples the charge by induction. A typical surface meter may measure from 0 to 30,000 volts dc, in .5 volt increments. However, as with most digital meters they may wonder around while hunting the decimal.

              I normally use an oscilloscope for static dc charges of a few thousand volts. It responds very fast and can register quick enough to capture static dc values before the stored charge is dissipated. This fast dissipation of the charge, along with high voltage values, is why normal voltmeters can't be used to measure static voltages, they can't register fast enough. Any time a measuring device actually makes electrical contact with the object storing a static charge, the charge is totally consumed or drastically reduced in value. This is due to a static charge only having a very limited current capacity, and is quickly drained of its coulomb charge value.

              The oscilloscope's horizontal time line is reduced from a solid line to a dot on the display screen. The dot deflects upward to indicate a positive charge and downward for a negative charge. Charge value is usually indicated by a volts per centimeter rating for the dot's deflection. Voltage multiplier probes are used for measuring higher voltage values. The test probe is normally required to touch the object under test and this means that the charge will be depleted. However, the charge value is measured in the process of loosing the charge. A test plate can also be used instead of having the scope probe touch the charged surface, this preserves the charge.

              There are quite a few other ways to measure relative static charge value, but most only give ballpark indications.

              Thanks,
              James Goss
            • Robert
              Jame G, Thank you for this post...for more clarity. Robert
              Message 6 of 25 , May 7, 2011
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                Jame G,
                Thank you for this post...for more clarity.

                Robert

                --- In joecellfreeenergydevice@yahoogroups.com, "jgosscacc1" <jgosscacc@...> wrote:
                >
                >
                > Jim ask: "What is the preferred method of measuring a static electrical charge?"
                >
                > Hello Jim,
                >
                > A surface dc voltmeter is probably the most accurate. It measures static charge of an object, metal or nonmetal, without actually touching the surface of the object. This is good because taking a sample of the charge value doesn't dissipate the stored charge on the object under test. This meter is typically held about one inch from the surface being tested and samples the charge by induction. A typical surface meter may measure from 0 to 30,000 volts dc, in .5 volt increments. However, as with most digital meters they may wonder around while hunting the decimal.
                >
                > I normally use an oscilloscope for static dc charges of a few thousand volts. It responds very fast and can register quick enough to capture static dc values before the stored charge is dissipated. This fast dissipation of the charge, along with high voltage values, is why normal voltmeters can't be used to measure static voltages, they can't register fast enough. Any time a measuring device actually makes electrical contact with the object storing a static charge, the charge is totally consumed or drastically reduced in value. This is due to a static charge only having a very limited current capacity, and is quickly drained of its coulomb charge value.
                >
                > The oscilloscope's horizontal time line is reduced from a solid line to a dot on the display screen. The dot deflects upward to indicate a positive charge and downward for a negative charge. Charge value is usually indicated by a volts per centimeter rating for the dot's deflection. Voltage multiplier probes are used for measuring higher voltage values. The test probe is normally required to touch the object under test and this means that the charge will be depleted. However, the charge value is measured in the process of loosing the charge. A test plate can also be used instead of having the scope probe touch the charged surface, this preserves the charge.
                >
                > There are quite a few other ways to measure relative static charge value, but most only give ballpark indications.
                >
                > Thanks,
                > James Goss
                >
              • Huuman
                *Thanks James... you are truly amazing and always informative.*
                Message 7 of 25 , May 7, 2011
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                  Thanks James...  you are truly amazing and always informative.

                  On 5/7/2011 12:34 AM, jgosscacc1 wrote:
                   


                  Jim ask: "What is the preferred method of measuring a static electrical charge?"

                  Hello Jim,

                  A surface dc voltmeter is probably the most accurate. It measures static charge of an object, metal or nonmetal, without actually touching the surface of the object. This is good because taking a sample of the charge value doesn't dissipate the stored charge on the object under test. This meter is typically held about one inch from the surface being tested and samples the charge by induction. A typical surface meter may measure from 0 to 30,000 volts dc, in .5 volt increments. However, as with most digital meters they may wonder around while hunting the decimal.

                  I normally use an oscilloscope for static dc charges of a few thousand volts. It responds very fast and can register quick enough to capture static dc values before the stored charge is dissipated. This fast dissipation of the charge, along with high voltage values, is why normal voltmeters can't be used to measure static voltages, they can't register fast enough. Any time a measuring device actually makes electrical contact with the object storing a static charge, the charge is totally consumed or drastically reduced in value. This is due to a static charge only having a very limited current capacity, and is quickly drained of its coulomb charge value.

                  The oscilloscope's horizontal time line is reduced from a solid line to a dot on the display screen. The dot deflects upward to indicate a positive charge and downward for a negative charge. Charge value is usually indicated by a volts per centimeter rating for the dot's deflection. Voltage multiplier probes are used for measuring higher voltage values. The test probe is normally required to touch the object under test and this means that the charge will be depleted. However, the charge value is measured in the process of loosing the charge. A test plate can also be used instead of having the scope probe touch the charged surface, this preserves the charge.

                  There are quite a few other ways to measure relative static charge value, but most only give ballpark indications.

                  Thanks,
                  James Goss


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