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Re: [jmdg] OT: Thank you aka what I learned from JMD group

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  • bethmart52@aol.com
    From the comments it s apparent that the little woman attitude of car salesman is widespread. The last time we bought a car the salesman kept telling me
    Message 1 of 9 , Jul 1, 2003
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      From the comments it's apparent that the "little woman" attitude of car salesman is widespread. The last time we bought a car the salesman kept telling me about all the room for my purchases from the Mall and kept calling me "The Mrs." It was time to get a new car and this time I insisted Al find a new dealer. Al does the car research by going on-line to compare prices and find out what's available on different models at the dealerships.

      He found a new dealrship and they were pretty good. As usual I insisted that no dealership logos be on the car when we picked it up and finally, someone paid attention to what I wanted. (I had read that muggers/rapists use that stuff as a way to approach women and catch them offguard - they see the dealership logo which often has a town name in it (like Newburgh Park Motors) and go up to women in the parking lot or garage and say something like - oh you're from Newburgh, so am I - and then wham - they attack. I've asked twice before
      and no one listened to "The Mrs."

      Beth
    • M Zaidi
      Dear Skrzat I am glad to hear that you are o.k. I do not know what to say about car sales men. When my husband and I were looking for a car for our business
      Message 2 of 9 , Jul 1, 2003
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         Dear Skrzat
        I am glad to hear that you are o.k.
        I do not know what to say about car sales men.   When my husband and I were looking for a car for our  business my husband asked a number of question about it--but he does work in the car  industry,
        As I did the books for the company I asked a lot of financial questions (unfortunately the sales person did not know the difference between a statement and an invoice).  He did however wrinkle his nose at me and say
        "You really do wear the pants around here don't you !"
         
        This put me off Ford.
         
        Has any one else had problems when getting car repairs done?
        My little Honda civic had a temperature gage problem and the garage wanted over 300.00 dollars to fix it--(this was 1975 dollars)
        my then boyfriend now husband looked under the hood and fixed it for under 5.00
        I was getting new tires on a car and the people at the garage told me that my brakes were in such bad shape that could not guarantee my getting home safely (they said this while staring at my two small kids.) The catch to this conversation was that my father and husband had done a complete  brake job on my car the previous week.
        I have to admit that I now have my husband go to the garadge and handle the stuff-
        Would you  understand that if ever I were to get a divorce I would put in a condition that my "ex" would still take
        cars into get serviced.
         
         
         
        I do not know what to say
        Angela
         
         
         
          -----Original Message-----
        From: skrzat@... [mailto:skrzat@...]
        Sent: June 30, 2003 11:17 PM
        To: jmdg@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: [jmdg] OT: Thank you aka what I learned from JMD group

        Thank you all lovely ladies from JMDG.
        Without realizing I learned to look at unpleasant things that happen in my life
        from different perspective. It was so strangely fascinating to see that people
        that I had never seen in my life could over the years give me advice that will
        change my outlook on life.
        Few days ago I had a car accident, despite what happen the thoughts running in
        my head were "thank God nobody was hurt". Being a part of the list and reading
        about the lives of others helped me. So thanks a bunch.
        Skrzat
        P.S. If anyone has a few good tricks how a female can buy a car and still be
        treated as equal customer by a car salesman will be greately appreciated.



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      • Newsgaltoo@aol.com
        LOL!!! Great story, MaryLee! It s always been my favorite, when being talked down to by a car salesman or repairman to find a way to work this into the
        Message 3 of 9 , Jul 2, 2003
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          LOL!!!

          Great story, MaryLee!

          It's always been my favorite, when being talked down to by a car salesman or repairman to find a way to work this into the conversation:

          "I don't know I'm buying (fixing) this car. I have a 1970 Ford Torino in storage and should just get it out and road ready. I mean, it's a hardtop convertible, with a 351 Cleveland, not Windsor, engine, two-barrel carb and custom installed dual exhaust. It's the custom "Grabber Green" paint job. When I told Lee Iacocca about it (FYI: He was Ford's chairman during those years), he oooohed and told me I had a real gem to hold onto."

          Never fails to stop them dead in their tracks and I notice a major change in attitude. ;-)

          {{{hugs}}}
          Mary Ann
        • Mary Lee Boyance
          From Mary Ann, LOL!!! Great story, MaryLee! ... You know, I was trying to remember just where it was that I lived when a car salesman actually, literally
          Message 4 of 9 , Jul 2, 2003
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            From Mary Ann,
            " LOL!!!

            Great story, MaryLee!"

            ---So is yours! :)

            You know, I was trying to remember just where it was that I lived when a car
            salesman actually, literally called me "little lady". I think it was
            Kentucky.... Anyway, while pondering that, I remembered a related incident
            that kind of sums the whole experience up. A few years ago, at a different
            dealership, I was waiting in the service department waiting room for an oil
            change. There was a salesman, complete with bad suit and smarmy grin, who
            kept trying, emphasis on trying, to flirt with me whenever I'd be in there.
            Well, this one time, I was sitting there reading, and he comes along to
            lounge against the frame of the door leading out into the showroom. He
            watched me reading for a while. I didn't really look up, just had THAT
            radar activate. Finally, he asks, in this fake bright voice, "Wha'cha
            readin'? A mystery?". I looked up, held up my book so he could see the
            cover, and said casually, "No, E. M. Forster." Dead silence...um, except I
            may have heard an audible gulp! He pracically ran out of there, without
            saying another word, and I never saw him anywhere near the waiting room
            again! I'm not sure exactly why Howards End was so frightening to the poor
            man, but it still makes me laugh when I think about it. :)

            MaryLee
          • Rusalka
            MaryLee, I have to admit to ignorance. Is that important literature ? I m woefully uneducated in that area...not to mention a few others, sigh. Enlighten
            Message 5 of 9 , Jul 3, 2003
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              MaryLee,  I have to admit to ignorance.  Is that "important literature"?  I'm woefully uneducated in that area...not to mention a few others, sigh.
               
              Enlighten me, pretty please?
               
              Rusalka 
               
              -------Original Message-------
               
              Date: Wednesday, July 02, 2003 11:34:19 PM
              Subject: Re: [jmdg] OT: Thank you aka what I learned from JMD group
               
              From Mary Ann,
              " LOL!!!

              Great story, MaryLee!"

              ---So is yours! :)

              You know, I was trying to remember just where it was that I lived when a car
              salesman actually, literally called me "little lady".  I think it was
              Kentucky....  Anyway, while pondering that, I remembered a related incident
              that kind of sums the whole experience up.  A few years ago, at a different
              dealership, I was waiting in the service department waiting room for an oil
              change.  There was a salesman, complete with bad suit and smarmy grin, who
              kept trying, emphasis on trying, to flirt with me whenever I'd be in there.
              Well, this one time, I was sitting there reading, and he comes along to
              lounge against the frame of the door leading out into the showroom.  He
              watched me reading for a while.  I didn't really look up, just had THAT
              radar activate.  Finally, he asks, in this fake bright voice, "Wha'cha
              readin'?  A mystery?".   I looked up,  held up my book so he could see the
              cover, and said casually, "No, E. M. Forster."  Dead silence...um, except I
              may have heard an audible gulp!  He pracically ran out of there, without
              saying another word, and I never saw him anywhere near the waiting room
              again!   I'm not sure exactly why Howards End was so frightening to the poor
              man, but it still makes me laugh when I think about it. :)

              MaryLee






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            • Mary Lee Boyance
              From Rusalka: MaryLee, I have to admit to ignorance. Is that important literature ? I m woefully uneducated in that area...not to mention a few others,
              Message 6 of 9 , Jul 3, 2003
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                From Rusalka:
                 
                "MaryLee,  I have to admit to ignorance.  Is that "important literature"?  I'm woefully uneducated in that area...not to mention a few others, sigh.
                 
                Enlighten me, pretty please?"
                 
                -----E. M. Forster wrote several novels in the early 20th century that became the darlings of the wonderfully highbrow Merchant Ivory production team.  Movies like Howard's End, starring Anthony Hopkins, Emma Thompson, and Vanessa Redgrave, and a Room With a View, starring Helena Bonham Carter and Maggie Smith.  I fell in love with the movies, initially because of Anthony Hopkins and Vanessa Redgrave being in Howard's end, and then fell in love with Forster's writing as well.  Howards End in particular has the most wonderful turns of phrase, and the movie is just dripping in talent, atmosphere, and gorgeous Edwardian costumes.  Other Forster novels include A Passage to India and Where Angels Fear to Tread.  Not everybody's cup of tea, but they can be very charming reads once you get hooked on Forster's style.
                 
                BTW, for what it's worth, I'd never read, or sometimes even heard of, a lot of these "important" writers I've fallen in love with in the past few years, until I started watching a lot of movies starring the famous British stage\movie actors I admire so much.  I became an Oscar Wilde fan the same way, after watching Wilde.  Hans Christian Anderson's short stories because of The Pledge.  Currently on a Virginia Woolf jag, after watching Mrs. Dalloway and reading The Hours (written by Michael Cunningham) and then getting the movie The Hours and am now reading Mrs. Dalloway.  All these because of Vanessa Redgrave movies.  Anthony Hopkins movies led me to Howards End, The Remains of the Day by Kazuo Ishiguro, Surprised by Joy, by C. S. Lewis (knew him from The Chronicles of Narnia)...well, and Thomas Harris!  Turned me into a Hannibal Lecter novel\movie addict.  I'd argue that Harris has his moments of greatness among literary classics of our time.  I dunno.  I didn't intend for my interest in certain actors' bodies of work to turn into a literary education, but it seems to be turning out that way.
                 
                MaryLee
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