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Dobrinsky, Roz*, Sereb*

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  • abell07030
    I helped pay for a researcher to transcribe some records for Dobrinskys, Rozovskys, Rudnois and Serebrennys from Bragin and Loev. The records for the Rozovskys
    Message 1 of 3 , Jan 22, 2003
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      I helped pay for a researcher to transcribe some records for
      Dobrinskys, Rozovskys, Rudnois and Serebrennys from Bragin and Loev.

      The records for the Rozovskys are especially cool and seem to sketch
      out about seven family trees going back to the early 1700s. It looks
      as if there might really be just three separate families, or even one
      family with three main branches.

      Back in the 1700s, the name was written as "Rozevij," which I think
      is the Ukrainian version of "Rozovij," so I think that means the trees
      could also be of interest to people with the surname Rosoff, Rozevsky,
      etc. as well as Rozovsky/Rosovsky/Rosofsky.

      I'm still figuring out what I'm allowed to share publicly about the
      info, but, anyhow, if you're interested in any of these surnames,
      please e-mail me at allbell@... and let's talk tree.
    • digging4roots
      ... Was the data in a publicly accesible file, such as the FHC or NARA? If so, then it s in the public domain. If it s data you paid for and paid for the
      Message 2 of 3 , Feb 20, 2003
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        > I'm still figuring out what I'm allowed to share publicly about the
        > info, but, anyhow, if you're interested in any of these surnames,
        > please e-mail me at allbell@v... and let's talk tree.

        Was the data in a publicly accesible file, such as the FHC or NARA? If
        so, then it's in the public domain.

        If it's data you paid for and paid for the transcription as well --
        then you own the portion of what you have. At least according to US
        law and what I understand of it -- data in and of itself (assuming not
        put in some private repository or publication) isn't copyrighted.
        Don't forget there's also the FOIA which at some point affects all
        personal data bringing it into the public domain. The number of years
        depending on any number of factors.

        A few places which might be of help to you:

        http://www.uspto.gov/
        http://www.eff.org/IP/
        http://www.ifla.org/II/cpyright.htm
        http://65.202.253.39/patft/help.htm (new site for ifla.org)

        And there is a classification for genealogy research ...

        The S field indicates the status of the record: A=added, M=modified,
        D=deleted. The Date field indicates the date of that status. Minor
        corrections to an entry, e.g., typos, are not considered changes in
        status.

        T IC S Date Goods
        - -- - ---- ---------------
        S 042 A 4/2/91 Genealogy research

        As a side bar, I happened to search in the trademark/copyright
        database and found the following others might also find interesting:

        Basic comprehensive genealogical and family history system of
        straightline genealogy
        http://patft.uspto.gov/netacgi/nph-Parser?Sect1=PT
        O2&Sect2=HITOFF&u=/netahtml/search-adv.htm&r=7&p=1
        &f=G&l=50&d=pall&S1=(genealogy.TTL.+OR+genealogy.O
        RPL.)&OS=ttl/(genealogy)+or+oref/(genealogy)&RS=(T
        TL/genealogy+OR+OREF/genealogy)
      • abell07030
        ... If ... not ... The data was in an archive in Minsk, or some place else in Belarus. Also, I gave the guy who really commissioned the research a check, but I
        Message 3 of 3 , Mar 4 6:38 AM
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          --- In jewishgenealogy2000@yahoogroups.com, digging4roots
          <no_reply@y...> wrote:

          >
          > Was the data in a publicly accesible file, such as the FHC or NARA?
          If
          > so, then it's in the public domain.
          >
          > If it's data you paid for and paid for the transcription as well --
          > then you own the portion of what you have. At least according to US
          > law and what I understand of it -- data in and of itself (assuming
          not
          > put in some private repository or publication) isn't copyrighted.

          The data was in an archive in Minsk, or some place else in Belarus.

          Also, I gave the guy who really commissioned the research a check, but
          I just volunteered what I could afford ($200 - just had a new baby,
          sorry) and I'm not sure how that compares with the overall cost of the
          research.

          Finally, even if, in theory, I have the legal right to use the data
          publicly, I wouldn't want to do that if it would hurt the researcher's
          feelings.

          On the other hand, I'm hypocritical enough that I have no compunctions
          whatsoever about sharing anything I get with people who might actually
          be my relatives. If the CIA gave me a folder full of top-secret data
          about the origins of the Rozovskys, I'd be emailing it to my cousins
          in an instant. :-)
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