Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.
 

What's in a Letter?

Expand Messages
  • Joel E. Natt <nattjo@yahoo.com>
    The subject may appear as a simple question... But in reality it has many items attached. If you are in school a letter is the difference between passing and
    Message 1 of 3 , Jan 4, 2003
      The subject may appear as a simple question... But in reality it has
      many items attached.

      If you are in school a letter is the difference between passing and
      failing a course.

      If you are looking for an address it could be the difference between
      one direction or another.

      But, in Genealogy it could be a major difference. I recently learned
      that.

      For years I have been searching for my Great-Grandfather immigration
      records. I knew that he came from Russia via England and then South
      America, but could never locate him. I was able to find his wife's
      (my Great-Grandmother's) records of arrival in the Ellis Island
      system, but could never locate him. I searched for any male with or
      without his first name or letter, determined to locate him, I would
      check at numerous ports of entry for the US from Boston to Miami on
      the east coast to New Orleans and Texas in the Gulf and even the West
      coast of the US. My search took several years, but got no luck
      finding him.

      To add to my search I have attempted to locate his Citizen papers and
      numerous other documents, like draft papers or military papers. I
      even check with the cemetery on what they have on record. But
      everything including the entire family claimed that the name was
      spelled correctly. So finding the records became more difficult.

      So I ask what is in a letter for a name???

      With my Great-Grandfather I did not learn that there was a different
      spelling of his last name until I was finally able to locate a
      distant cousin in England and learn that there is a letter that is
      not on any documentation (including Census). So with this newest
      information I was able to quickly learn a great amount on him and
      other items. Including how he came to America and what ship he took.

      So in the end it was all in a letter.

      Just thought I would share a bit.

      Joel

      BTW... The name I had was Shuster and the name provided by my cousin
      Schuster.
    • allbell
      ... Keep in mind that Polish spellings can be especially strange-looking to English speakers. Example: Cz represents the Ch sound, and the letter C
      Message 2 of 3 , Jan 4, 2003
        --- In jewishgenealogy2000@yahoogroups.com, "Joel E. Natt
        <nattjo@y...>" <nattjo@y...> wrote:
        > The subject may appear as a simple question... But in reality it has
        > many items attached.

        Keep in mind that Polish spellings can be especially strange-looking
        to English speakers.

        Example: "Cz" represents the "Ch sound," and the letter "C" represents
        the "Tz" sound.

        Even if you're not so great with language, it might make sense to try
        to at least learn a tiny bit of Russian, Polish and German just to
        understand why names might be spelled the way they are.
      • digging4roots
        It s also a good idea to use the DM to find alternate name spellings. An easy way to do this is to plug the name into the CJSI (Consolidated Jewish Surname
        Message 3 of 3 , Feb 20, 2003
          It's also a good idea to use the DM to find alternate name spellings.
          An easy way to do this is to plug the name into the CJSI (Consolidated
          Jewish Surname Index) at:
          http://www.avotaynu.com/csi/csi-home.html

          For example, plugging in my families original name (for which I have
          so many different spellings all for one person as to be unbelievable),
          Goldglejt, I learned that the DM code for it is 583583.

          With that in mind, I took note of all the other names listed with the
          same DM code which could be remotely similar to mine and, when
          searching, tried these alternate names.

          Of course, this doesn't always work. My great-grandfather, whom
          everyone knew as Max (Motl) Gold, arrived under the name Abram
          Goldblum! (Turned out his name was Abraham Mordechai (Motl) Goldglejt.
          He dropped the Abraham when he naturalized and Americanized the Motl
          to Max. But how did he get the name Goldblum? I can only assume
          someone made a transcription error somewhere back in the old country.

          Go figure!
        Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.