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Bell surname.

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  • minnesota1984
    What are the surnames for Bell in the area around Mogilev. I think the name must have been changed, but relatives do no know what the name was.
    Message 1 of 3 , Nov 28, 2002
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      What are the surnames for Bell in the area around Mogilev. I think
      the name must have been changed, but relatives do no know what the
      name was.
    • allbell
      ... My great-grandfather (who was from Poland, not Belarus) started with the surname Sivak. He said he picked the name Bell because, when it was time to tell
      Message 2 of 3 , Dec 6, 2002
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        --- In jewishgenealogy2000@y..., "minnesota1984" <Pab349@a...> wrote:
        > What are the surnames for Bell in the area around Mogilev. I think
        > the name must have been changed, but relatives do no know what the
        > name was.

        My great-grandfather (who was from Poland, not Belarus) started
        with the surname Sivak. He said he picked the name Bell because, when
        it was time to tell the officials at Ellis Island his name, he saw a
        picture of the Liberty Bell.

        My totally unsubstantiated suspicion is that some Jews with some kind
        of regulatory difficulties (maybe draft dodgers or tax evaders)
        traveled under fake names for some reason, and that "Bell" was on the
        documents my great-grandfather happened to use. If so, there might not
        be any ordinary equivalent to the surname Bell, because Bell might be
        more of a fake paper name than anything else.

        If Bell is ever associated with real
        Russian/Polish/Ukrainian/Belarusian names, maybe it could be names
        that start with "byelo-," which means "white."
      • digging4roots
        ... Not to rain on your parade: but I hope you realize that names were never changed at Ellis Island. Name changes occurred only in the courts. Briefly: an
        Message 3 of 3 , Feb 20, 2003
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          --- In jewishgenealogy2000@yahoogroups.com, allbell <no_reply@y...> wrote:
          > --- In jewishgenealogy2000@y..., "minnesota1984" <Pab349@a...> wrote:
          > > What are the surnames for Bell in the area around Mogilev. I think
          > > the name must have been changed, but relatives do no know what the
          > > name was.
          >
          > My great-grandfather (who was from Poland, not Belarus) started
          > with the surname Sivak. He said he picked the name Bell because, when
          > it was time to tell the officials at Ellis Island his name, he saw a
          > picture of the Liberty Bell.

          Not to rain on your parade: but I hope you realize that names were
          never changed at Ellis Island. Name changes occurred only in the courts.

          Briefly: an immigrant applied for an exit visa (or similar). With that
          in hand, he then purchased a ticket. The passenger manifest was
          created at the time the ticket was purchased -- in the country of
          origin. At Ellis Island they checked the passengers, visas and
          manifest. They had to all agree.

          > My totally unsubstantiated suspicion is that some Jews with some kind
          > of regulatory difficulties (maybe draft dodgers or tax evaders)
          > traveled under fake names for some reason, and that "Bell" was on the
          > documents my great-grandfather happened to use. If so, there might not
          > be any ordinary equivalent to the surname Bell, because Bell might be
          > more of a fake paper name than anything else.

          Some traveled under bogus names for much simpler reasons. In the case
          of my great-grandfather, he used his brother's passport and visa
          because his brother got drafted!

          Sometimes the person who was supposed to go, dies unexpectedly or for
          some reason is unable to travel. It was not uncommon to pass the
          ticket and passport on to someone else who could use it.

          Another ancestor brought over a friend's daughter on her own
          daughter's passport when her child died of consumption (or something).

          Bottom line: the simplest answers to the odd things which happened to
          our ancestors are often the most likely.

          Good luck in your research,

          Jeanne
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