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Re: Help!!!

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  • klezmer101
    Klezmer to the rescue... I remember reading a report that WWI draft records were available and quite useful. I haven t ever used them, so this is second hand.
    Message 1 of 4 , Jul 31, 2002
      Klezmer to the rescue...

      I remember reading a report that WWI draft records were available and
      quite useful. I haven't ever used them, so this is second hand. But I
      would start with the Mormons and see what they have regarding WWI
      draft records.

      Also, it might be interesting to explore the naturalization angle. I
      don't know whether your ancestor became a naturalized citizen, but he
      may have filed his "first papers" prior to his wife's arrival. If so,
      it may provide a little bit of information (notably an address). Then
      you can use business directories and the census to trace him from
      year to year.

      A trick I've used successfully for naturalization papers is the
      following:

      1. Pick a year in which there was a presidential election, preferably
      a relatively recent year that you are convinced your ancestor would
      have voted.

      2. Hopefully you know your ancestor's exact address for that year.

      3. With that information, find out the board of electors that covers
      that address. For that election, ask for voter registration
      information regarding your ancestor, in particular the exact
      reference to his naturalization records. This will result in a court,
      docket number and other filing numbers.

      4. With that information, write to the court and ask for copies of
      all the naturalization papers.

      -klezmer, feeling masculine today...

      --- In jewishgenealogy2000@y..., allbell <no_reply@y...> wrote:
      > --- In jewishgenealogy2000@y..., "nattjo" <nattjo@y...> wrote:
      > >I can not find any records prior to his wife's arrival in the US
      of
      > him.
      > >
      > > Can anyone offer me some assistance on where to look or other
      > avenues available to me on this matter?
      >
      > If Klezmer is here, s/he is the expert here on genealogical
      > procedures, but, anyhow, do you know if any of this ancestor's
      > brothers or sisters came over around the same time?
      >
    • nattjo
      What I do have is the 1920 Census showing that my Great-Grandfather is a US citizen and I have the Ellis Island records for my Great- Grandmother who entered
      Message 2 of 4 , Aug 5, 2002
        What I do have is the 1920 Census showing that my Great-Grandfather
        is a US citizen and I have the Ellis Island records for my Great-
        Grandmother who entered the US on the S.S. Olympic in November of
        1920. They both show that my Great-Grandfather was a US Citizen, so
        I will turn to the Mormons and search some more.

        I would be interested in a little more guideance on the Voter Record
        item you suggested. If someone has a sample letter or something to
        help guide me I would be greatful

        Thanks for the pointers and I hope we can work more together in the
        future.

        Joel

        --- In jewishgenealogy2000@y..., klezmer101 <no_reply@y...> wrote:
        > Klezmer to the rescue...
        >
        > I remember reading a report that WWI draft records were available
        > and quite useful. I haven't ever used them, so this is second hand.
        > But I would start with the Mormons and see what they have regarding
        > WWI draft records.
        >
        > Also, it might be interesting to explore the naturalization angle.
        > I don't know whether your ancestor became a naturalized citizen,
        > but he may have filed his "first papers" prior to his wife's
        > arrival. If so, it may provide a little bit of information (notably
        > an address). Then you can use business directories and the census
        > to trace him from year to year.
        >
        > A trick I've used successfully for naturalization papers is the
        > following:
        >
        > 1. Pick a year in which there was a presidential election,
        > preferably a relatively recent year that you are convinced your
        > ancestor would have voted.
        >
        > 2. Hopefully you know your ancestor's exact address for that year.
        >
        > 3. With that information, find out the board of electors that
        > covers that address. For that election, ask for voter registration
        > information regarding your ancestor, in particular the exact
        > reference to his naturalization records. This will result in a
        > court, docket number and other filing numbers.
        >
        > 4. With that information, write to the court and ask for copies of
        > all the naturalization papers.
        >
        > -klezmer, feeling masculine today...
        >
        > --- In jewishgenealogy2000@y..., allbell <no_reply@y...> wrote:
        > > --- In jewishgenealogy2000@y..., "nattjo" <nattjo@y...> wrote:
        > > >I can not find any records prior to his wife's arrival in the US
        > of
        > > him.
        > > >
        > > > Can anyone offer me some assistance on where to look or other
        > > avenues available to me on this matter?
        > >
        > > If Klezmer is here, s/he is the expert here on genealogical
        > > procedures, but, anyhow, do you know if any of this ancestor's
        > > brothers or sisters came over around the same time?
        > >
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