Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

RE: [jazz_guitar] Re: Dave Woods, Learning Chords

Expand Messages
  • Bill Williams
    ... Thanks for pointing this out, Mick. In the chart of Fables of Faubus (Mingus) I had come across this very voicing played over both Fm9(maj7) and Bb7(b5)
    Message 1 of 9 , Apr 1 12:06 AM
    View Source
    • 0 Attachment
      Sonomatips said:
      >This chord can also be used as an altered dominant chord, e.g., Fm9#7 (= F-
      >Ab-C-E-G) used for E7#9#5 or Bb13#11 (the root 'F' could be left out
      >of these voicings). - Mick
      Thanks for pointing this out, Mick.
      In the chart of Fables of Faubus (Mingus) I had come across this very
      voicing played over both Fm9(maj7) and Bb7(b5) and had never quite got the
      logic.

      Bill Williams


      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Ron Perry
      Gu;ys: Thanks for the help on the Fm#7. I ll try the chords suggested in our rehearsal today. ... From: sonomatips To: jazz_guitar@yahoogroups.com Sent:
      Message 2 of 9 , Apr 1 4:12 AM
      View Source
      • 0 Attachment
        Gu;ys:

        Thanks for the help on the Fm#7. I'll try the chords suggested in our rehearsal today.
        ----- Original Message -----
        From: sonomatips
        To: jazz_guitar@yahoogroups.com
        Sent: Thursday, March 31, 2005 11:27 PM
        Subject: [jazz_guitar] Re: Dave Woods, Learning Chords



        It is the I chord in a minor key, e.g., the song 'In A Sentimental
        Mood'. Melodic or harmonic minor scales would be played over it. This
        chord can also be used as an altered dominant chord, e.g., Fm9#7 (= F-
        Ab-C-E-G) used for E7#9#5 or Bb13#11 (the root 'F' could be left out
        of these voicings). - Mick

        --- In jazz_guitar@yahoogroups.com, "Dave Woods" <david_woods@v...>
        wrote:
        >
        > I'd say that it's an Fmin. triad with an E natural added.
        > F Ab C E natural. F min.M7
        >
        > Dave Woods www.musictolight.org
        >
        > > I was playing a song in a chorus band, and came across a Fm#7.
        What do you make of this chord. Why would they write it. Ron

        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • mepickerman
        Thanks for the explanation. But as usual I m confused. I, too, have seen this voicing in a Fake book for Lady is a Tramp. it is in the key of G and at the
        Message 3 of 9 , Apr 1 7:22 AM
        View Source
        • 0 Attachment
          Thanks for the explanation. But as usual I'm confused. I, too, have
          seen this voicing in a Fake book for "Lady is a Tramp." it is in the
          key of G and at the end it goes Am7/Am#7Am7 to D(V) and back and
          back I read it as a ii and I just tap a G# for one beat. I view as a
          sort of suspension for lack of a better term. Am I completely missing
          the point here?
          Robert
          >
          > It is the I chord in a minor key, e.g., the song 'In A
          Sentimental
          > Mood'. Melodic or harmonic minor scales would be played over it.
          This
          > chord can also be used as an altered dominant chord, e.g., Fm9#7
          (= F-
          > Ab-C-E-G) used for E7#9#5 or Bb13#11 (the root 'F' could be left
          out
          > of these voicings). - Mick
          >
          > --- In jazz_guitar@yahoogroups.com, "Dave Woods"
          <david_woods@v...>
          > wrote:
          > >
          > > I'd say that it's an Fmin. triad with an E natural added.
          > > F Ab C E natural. F min.M7
          > >
          > > Dave Woods www.musictolight.org
          > >
          > > > I was playing a song in a chorus band, and came across a
          Fm#7.
          > What do you make of this chord. Why would they write it. Ron
          >
          > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Dave Woods
          The G# is nothing but a decoration on the A min. chord. It s there only to create a chromatic line. (G G# G F#) A min.7 has the G, A min.M7 has the G#,
          Message 4 of 9 , Apr 1 10:40 AM
          View Source
          • 0 Attachment
            The G# is nothing but a decoration on the A min. chord.
            It's there only to create a chromatic line. (G G# G F#) A min.7 has the
            G, A min.M7 has the G#, back to Amin.7has the G again. D9 has the F#. A
            min.6 would work as well as the D9. It also contains the F#. Think of it
            all as A min.

            ----- Original Message -----
            From: "mepickerman" <rcooper@...>
            To: <jazz_guitar@yahoogroups.com>
            Sent: Friday, April 01, 2005 10:22 AM
            Subject: [jazz_guitar] Re: Dave Woods, Learning Chords


            >
            >
            >
            > Thanks for the explanation. But as usual I'm confused. I, too, have
            > seen this voicing in a Fake book for "Lady is a Tramp." it is in the
            > key of G and at the end it goes Am7/Am#7Am7 to D(V) and back and
            > back I read it as a ii and I just tap a G# for one beat. I view as a
            > sort of suspension for lack of a better term. Am I completely missing
            > the point here?
            > Robert
            >>
            >> It is the I chord in a minor key, e.g., the song 'In A
            > Sentimental
            >> Mood'. Melodic or harmonic minor scales would be played over it.
            > This
            >> chord can also be used as an altered dominant chord, e.g., Fm9#7
            > (= F-
            >> Ab-C-E-G) used for E7#9#5 or Bb13#11 (the root 'F' could be left
            > out
            >> of these voicings). - Mick
            >>
            >> --- In jazz_guitar@yahoogroups.com, "Dave Woods"
            > <david_woods@v...>
            >> wrote:
            >> >
            >> > I'd say that it's an Fmin. triad with an E natural added.
            >> > F Ab C E natural. F min.M7
            >> >
            >> > Dave Woods www.musictolight.org
            >> >
            >> > > I was playing a song in a chorus band, and came across a
            > Fm#7.
            >> What do you make of this chord. Why would they write it. Ron
            >>
            >> [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            > Yahoo! Groups Links
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
          • sonomatips
            Fake books usually just say Dm for the Im chord. Im6 or Im#7 are the usual extensions of the tonic minor triad (Im). Often, a moving line is played from (in
            Message 5 of 9 , Apr 1 6:27 PM
            View Source
            • 0 Attachment
              Fake books usually just say "Dm" for the Im chord. Im6 or Im#7 are
              the usual extensions of the tonic minor triad (Im). Often, a moving
              line is played from (in D minor): Dm-Dm#7-Dm7-Dm6; i.e., the notes:
              D(1) >C#(#7th) > C(b7th) >B (6th). That would be the descending
              line, and I believe they even used it in the Jurassic period,
              although as Dave Woods will tell you, the descent was much steeper
              then.

              --- In jazz_guitar@yahoogroups.com, "mepickerman" <rcooper@p...>
              wrote:
              >
              > Thanks for the explanation. But as usual I'm confused. I, too,
              have
              > seen this voicing in a Fake book for "Lady is a Tramp." it is in
              the
              > key of G and at the end it goes Am7/Am#7Am7 to D(V) and back and
              > back I read it as a ii and I just tap a G# for one beat. I view as
              a
              > sort of suspension for lack of a better term. Am I completely
              missing the point here?
              > Robert
              > >
              > > It is the I chord in a minor key, e.g., the song 'In A
              > Sentimental
              > > Mood'. Melodic or harmonic minor scales would be played over it.
              This
              > > chord can also be used as an altered dominant chord, e.g., Fm9#7
              (= F-Ab-C-E-G) used for E7#9#5 or Bb13#11 (the root 'F' could be
              > > left out of these voicings). - Mick
            Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.