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[jasspa] MicroEmacs News

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  • Steven Phillips
    All, Quick update outlining changes on the horizon. 1) Display font support Support for bold, Italic, Light (if you have one), Reverse and Underline have
    Message 1 of 2 , Feb 2, 2000
      All,

      Quick update outlining changes on the horizon.

      1) Display font support

      Support for bold, Italic, Light (if you have one), Reverse and Underline
      have been added to windows (non-console version) and Xterm. The existing
      termcap font support has been re-written to provide a consistent font
      support interface.

      For all out there concerned that ME is growing out of control and turning
      into another Emacs do not worry. The executable size is about the same
      (264 bytes bigger on sunos 5.6) and there is no noticeable performance
      hit, in fact Jon spotted a nice optimization on win32 which has given it a
      33% speed-up!

      You can completely disable the use of fonts very easily by a new Use Fonts
      option in user-setup's Platform page.

      This has now reached a testing and documenting phase, we also need to
      produce some sensible schemes to use this feature. I you use your own
      schemes then firstly why haven't you submitted them to us (we get bored of
      creating them) and secondly you will probably have to alter them. This is
      because the current ME ignores the reverse font except when using fonts on
      Termcap. The new version always adheres to the reverse font so things look
      very strange until reverse is removed.

      2) New describe-word command

      I've created a new describe-word command which requires a command-line
      access to a word definition. The command will then be able to look-up and
      display the meaning of a given word. The command can be run separately or
      from the spell-checker.

      The command-line access could be some dictionary program you have, but
      typically it will be a grep into a text file containing all the words and
      definitions.

      For example, you can download an English dictionary from:

      http://www.mso.anu.edu.au/~ralph/OPTED/

      This is a 5.2Mb zip file containing 19.1Mb of text file word definitions,
      given the size I can't put this on the web-site. I downloaded this and
      turned the 26 text files into 1 and removed the html codes, ensuring one
      word and definition per line. The resultant file looks like:

      Abaction (n.) Stealing cattle on a large scale.
      Abactor (n.) One who steals and drives away cattle or beasts by herds or droves.
      Abaculi (pl. ) of Abaculus
      Abaculus (n.) A small tile of glass, marble, or other substance, of various colors, ..
      Abacuses (pl. ) of Abacus
      Abaci (pl. ) of Abacus

      etc. I then use grep as the command-line interface, i.e.

      grep -i "^<word> (" english-words

      This will output any found definition or nothing if not found.

      To get describe-word working you need to set 2 variables, instructions can
      be found in the new word.emf file. The command is surprisingly useful.

      Both of these should be available in the next beta.

      Hope that helpful, if so I'll try and drop these more often,

      Steve
    • Thomas Hundt
      ... Nice... Please allow for the possibility of not getting anything back. E.g. one can do a lookup in Microsoft Bookshelf from the command line:
      Message 2 of 2 , Feb 2, 2000
        |2) New describe-word command
        |
        | I've created a new describe-word command which requires a command-line
        | access to a word definition. The command will then be able to look-up and
        | display the meaning of a given word. The command can be run separately or
        | from the spell-checker.
        |
        | The command-line access could be some dictionary program you have, but
        | typically it will be a grep into a text file containing all the words and
        | definitions.

        Nice...

        Please allow for the possibility of not getting anything back.

        E.g. one can do a lookup in Microsoft Bookshelf from the command line:

        C:\>c:\app\books98\bshelf98 -i Jasspa

        brings up the Bookshelf 98 GUI with the nearest definition it can find:

        jat (jät) noun
        A member of a peasant caste residing in the Punjab and other areas of northern India and Pakistan, comprising Muslim, Hindu, and Sikh groups.

        I have it in my cdrom drive at all times.

        -Tom Hundt
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