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Jainism in Malaysia

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  • Anish A Shah
    Interesting Article on Jains in Malaysia http://www.nst.com.my/Current_News/nst/Sunday/Focus/20061007182800/Article/index_html Keeping the faith 08 Oct 2006
    Message 1 of 6 , Oct 9, 2006
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      Interesting Article on Jains in Malaysia
       

      Keeping the faith

      08 Oct 2006
      Himanshu Bhatt


      Unknown to many, the small religious community of the Jains recently observed an extraordinary fasting period. HIMANSHU BHATT discovers how the profound tradition is being kept alive in modern Malaysia.

      EVERYONE is aware of the ongoing Muslim fasting month of Ramadan, but one religious community — much smaller in size — recently observed its own fasting period that went largely unnoticed.

      Every year in September, followers of the Jain religion, numbering about a thousand in Malaysia, engage in a profound discipline of complete dietary abstention.

      The occasion, called ‘paryushan’, is commonly practised by young and old alike to facilitate a process of personal introspection, and as a testament of faith and devotion.

      Some give up food for just a day, while many choose to fast for eight sacred days or longer.

      In fact, the longest fasting period ever recorded in Malaysia by an individual is attributed to a Jain elder who lives in Kuala Lumpur.

      In 1995, Pravin Damani went 55 straight days without taking a single morsel as a personal observance for ‘paryushan'.

      The concept behind ‘paryushan' is actually deeply spiritual.

      "It is a process of spiritual cleansing which serves to strengthen your human principles," explains businessman Bhashkar Chitalia.

      Chitalia, 49, is the vice-president of the Gujarati Association of Wilayah Persekutuan and Selangor, and heads its religious committee.

      He stresses that fasting during 'paryushan' is not compulsory but is encouraged. The process involves consuming only boiled water between sunrise and sunset.

      The Jain community, consisting mostly of ethnic Gujaratis, is concentrated mainly in Penang, Ipoh, Kuala Lumpur and Malacca.

      Ipoh, in fact, is home to the largest Jain temple in South-East Asia — a majestic ornate-domed building located in First Garden, built by the family of local philanthropist Bharat Jasani.

      Jains in Kuala Lumpur recently celebrated ‘paryushan’ at a temple in Bangsar.

      Among the many who fasted was a 15-year-old boy, Darshan Shah, who abstained from eating for eight days.

      The Form Four student insists he came out of the experience refreshed and invigorated.

      "I feel I can concentrate much better now," he says. "I find that I am able to focus more easily."

      Shah, who had the support of his parents, was inspired after watching others undergo fasting in previous years.

      "I will do it again next year," he says. "And my friends also want to do it."

      Seeing someone like Shah must be reassuring for older members like Chitalia and his friend Rajesh Doshi, 50, who are part of a movement to encourage Jain understanding and awareness among youths.

      "Youths today ask the most important question: Why?" says Doshi.

      "We need to help them understand that our traditions are actually quite scientific. The fasting gives our body rest.

      Encouraging and educating youths is a challenge in Malacca, which has the oldest Jain community in the region.

      It is believed that Jains lived here during Portuguese rule in the 16th century and even earlier when traders from Gujarat flocked to the bustling port city.

      Today, the community in Malacca has shrunk significantly as many Gujaratis have moved to Kuala Lumpur.

      For Ishwarlal Dungarshi Mavani, 74, president of the Gujarati Vanik Sangh Melaka, education is a key to ensuring that ceremonies such as the ‘paryushan' are kept alive by future generations.

      Malacca’s Jain school for children, or a 'jainshala’, was set up in the fifties. Today, the school, run by volunteers, remains instrumental in passing down the values and beliefs of Jain culture to children and youths.

      "There are about 300 Jains in Malacca today," says Mavani.

      A volunteer at another ‘jainshala' in KL, Indiraben Kothari, vividly remembers the ‘paryushan’ gatherings during the 60s and 70s.

      Her late father-in-law, Fulchandbhai Kothari, a respected benefactor of the community, and his brother Lalchand Bhai, would host prayers at their house at 91 Batu Road — right opposite the Coliseum Theatre — and Jains from across the Klang Valley would gather there every year.

      Indiraben today helps to teach some 50 children at the ‘jainshala’.

      "We must instil the importance of our culture in our children. They need to understand how our traditions and beliefs are relevant today," she says.



      Who are the Jains? Why do they fast?

      THE fasting ceremony of ‘paryushan' is rooted in the concept of compassion and non-violence that is at the heart of ancient Jain philosophy.

      One of the key events on the last day of fasting is a deeply moving ritual called ‘alonna', where every member of the community asks forgiveness from others for any wrongdoing or offence.

      The members move around after prayer, greeting each other with the expression michami dukhadam (I ask for your forgiveness).

      "We ask for forgiveness from whoever we have wronged, and we forgive whoever may have wronged us," explains Bhashkar Chitalia.

      The prayers go to the extent of seeking forgiveness from all living creatures that may have been affected by one’s misdeeds — from the smallest living cell to the highest human being.

      It is symbolic of the Jain faith’s reverence for all life in the universe. Jains are strict vegetarians.

      Such a deep view of the living world in Jainism — a sister religion of Hinduism — is said to have inspired Mahatma Gandhi, a Gujarati himself, to adopt non-violence in his historic campaign against colonial British rule.

      Jainism’s main figure is the ascetic Mahavir, a contemporary of the Buddha, who lived in India some 2,600 years ago.

      Although the religion contributed to much of the art and architecture of the Indian sub-continent, there are today only five million Jains in the world.

      About a thousand Jains live in Malaysia today, and many trace their ethnic ancestry to Gujarat in India.

      The history of the community in Malaysia is closely tied to that of the Jains in Singapore who today number about 700. Interestingly, Singapore’s Inter-Religious Organisation (IRO) recently recognised Jainism as one of 10 main religions in the island-state.

      Dr Jitendra Tejani, a medical practitioner in Penang who fasted for six days during ‘paryushan’, explains that the human body has an immense ability to adapt in times of fasting.

      "When you take in food, the nourishments are kept in stores within your body. These stores are converted to energy.

      "For some reason, the stores have the ability to manage when the body stops taking food," said Tejani, 52, a past president of the Rotary Club of Tanjung Bungah, Penang.

      The fasting effectively induces minimum energy usage and optimum recycling from the stores.

      He adds that the fasting also rests the body's systems from the metabolic rigours of digestion, deposition, absorption, excretion and evacuation.

      "If you believe, your mind should be able to influence the body and help it balance its energies."



      From tragedy to priesthood

      THE first Malaysian to be ordained as a Jain priest was an ordinary Penangite in the 1940s who was severely affected by the atrocities of the Japanese army during the occupation of Malaya.

      The late Ratilal Muni Gathani was in his mid-20s and helping his family business in George Town’s King Street when the Japanese invaded.

      His eldest brother was killed by a Japanese bomb which fell in Penang Street, and the tragedy moved him deeply.

      Ratilal’s nephew, retired headmaster Shashikant Gathani, 65, remembers his uncle vividly till today.

      "When my eldest uncle was killed, they could not find his body even though they searched for months," recalls Shashikant.

      Ratilal was the youngest in the family. He was so struck that he renounced all worldly possessions and went to India, seeking to understand life through Jainism.

      "He never came back after that," Shashikant says. "I visited him in 1990 in Kharagpur where he was then staying, and found he still spoke fluent Malay." Ratilal passed away in Calcutta soon after.
       
       
    • mehul_turakhia
      Dear friends, Jaya jinendra Interesting and inspiring article from anishji . It is likely that Ratilal muni from Malaysia mentioned in the article is of
      Message 2 of 6 , Oct 10, 2006
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        Dear friends,
        Jaya jinendra
        Interesting and inspiring article from anishji .

        It is likely that Ratilal muni from Malaysia mentioned in the
        article is of Sthanakwasi Gondal sampradaya in Gujarat as many
        saints from this sampradaya had traveled towards Kolkatta including
        One Ratilal muni from gondal sampradaya himself .

        It is heard that there is one more saint Champak muni who was
        previous Acharya of Barvala sampradaya from Gujarat, who was in
        Penang Malayasia ( could be around 1930s ), prior to his diksha for
        some time. He is already met with Kaal dharma (passed away).

        In fact in agams it is found that there are many many shravaks
        (Present life in animal forms ) spread out in universe at different
        locations, who attain special knowledge due to external apparent
        causes ( nimitta ) , by which they can see previous births ( jati
        smaran gyan ). They adopt vrats again and try to follow different
        vrats with great loyalty. (Bhagawati ang agam ) Many finally adopt
        santhara in the end and become aradhak too . They are most likely
        scattered and isolated lives only. They are found in distant oceans
        and land masses as per jain cosmology . Our present jain population
        is quite small in numbers compared to their numbers.

        Mehul



        -- In jainlist@yahoogroups.com, "Anish A Shah" <anishshah19@...>
        wrote:
        >
        > Interesting Article on Jains in Malaysia
        >
        >
        http://www.nst.com.my/Current_News/nst/Sunday/Focus/20061007182800/Art
        icle/index_html
        > Keeping the faith
        > 08 Oct 2006
        > Himanshu Bhatt
        >
        >
        > --------------------------------------------------------------------
        ------------
        > Unknown to many, the small religious community of the Jains
        recently observed an extraordinary fasting period. HIMANSHU BHATT
        discovers how the profound tradition is being kept alive in modern
        Malaysia.
        >
        > EVERYONE is aware of the ongoing Muslim fasting month of Ramadan,
        but one religious community - much smaller in size - recently
        observed its own fasting period that went largely unnoticed.
        >
        > Every year in September, followers of the Jain religion, numbering
        about a thousand in Malaysia, engage in a profound discipline of
        complete dietary abstention.
        >
        > The occasion, called 'paryushan', is commonly practised by young
        and old alike to facilitate a process of personal introspection, and
        as a testament of faith and devotion.
        >
        > Some give up food for just a day, while many choose to fast for
        eight sacred days or longer.
        >
        > In fact, the longest fasting period ever recorded in Malaysia by an
        individual is attributed to a Jain elder who lives in Kuala Lumpur.
        >
        > In 1995, Pravin Damani went 55 straight days without taking a
        single morsel as a personal observance for 'paryushan'.
        >
        > The concept behind 'paryushan' is actually deeply spiritual.
        >
        > "It is a process of spiritual cleansing which serves to strengthen
        your human principles," explains businessman Bhashkar Chitalia.
        >
        > Chitalia, 49, is the vice-president of the Gujarati Association of
        Wilayah Persekutuan and Selangor, and heads its religious committee.
        >
        > He stresses that fasting during 'paryushan' is not compulsory but
        is encouraged. The process involves consuming only boiled water
        between sunrise and sunset.
        >
        > The Jain community, consisting mostly of ethnic Gujaratis, is
        concentrated mainly in Penang, Ipoh, Kuala Lumpur and Malacca.
        >
        > Ipoh, in fact, is home to the largest Jain temple in South-East
        Asia - a majestic ornate-domed building located in First Garden,
        built by the family of local philanthropist Bharat Jasani.
        >
        > Jains in Kuala Lumpur recently celebrated 'paryushan' at a temple
        in Bangsar.
        >
        > Among the many who fasted was a 15-year-old boy, Darshan Shah, who
        abstained from eating for eight days.
        >
        > The Form Four student insists he came out of the experience
        refreshed and invigorated.
        >
        > "I feel I can concentrate much better now," he says. "I find that I
        am able to focus more easily."
        >
        > Shah, who had the support of his parents, was inspired after
        watching others undergo fasting in previous years.
        >
        > "I will do it again next year," he says. "And my friends also want
        to do it."
        >
        > Seeing someone like Shah must be reassuring for older members like
        Chitalia and his friend Rajesh Doshi, 50, who are part of a movement
        to encourage Jain understanding and awareness among youths.
        >
        > "Youths today ask the most important question: Why?" says Doshi.
        >
        > "We need to help them understand that our traditions are actually
        quite scientific. The fasting gives our body rest.
        >
        > Encouraging and educating youths is a challenge in Malacca, which
        has the oldest Jain community in the region.
        >
        > It is believed that Jains lived here during Portuguese rule in the
        16th century and even earlier when traders from Gujarat flocked to
        the bustling port city.
        >
        > Today, the community in Malacca has shrunk significantly as many
        Gujaratis have moved to Kuala Lumpur.
        >
        > For Ishwarlal Dungarshi Mavani, 74, president of the Gujarati Vanik
        Sangh Melaka, education is a key to ensuring that ceremonies such as
        the 'paryushan' are kept alive by future generations.
        >
        > Malacca's Jain school for children, or a 'jainshala', was set up in
        the fifties. Today, the school, run by volunteers, remains
        instrumental in passing down the values and beliefs of Jain culture
        to children and youths.
        >
        > "There are about 300 Jains in Malacca today," says Mavani.
        >
        > A volunteer at another 'jainshala' in KL, Indiraben Kothari,
        vividly remembers the 'paryushan' gatherings during the 60s and 70s.
        >
        > Her late father-in-law, Fulchandbhai Kothari, a respected
        benefactor of the community, and his brother Lalchand Bhai, would
        host prayers at their house at 91 Batu Road - right opposite the
        Coliseum Theatre - and Jains from across the Klang Valley would
        gather there every year.
        >
        > Indiraben today helps to teach some 50 children at the 'jainshala'.
        >
        > "We must instil the importance of our culture in our children. They
        need to understand how our traditions and beliefs are relevant
        today," she says.
        >
        >
        > --------------------------------------------------------------------
        ------------
        >
        > Who are the Jains? Why do they fast?
        >
        > THE fasting ceremony of 'paryushan' is rooted in the concept of
        compassion and non-violence that is at the heart of ancient Jain
        philosophy.
        >
        > One of the key events on the last day of fasting is a deeply moving
        ritual called 'alonna', where every member of the community asks
        forgiveness from others for any wrongdoing or offence.
        >
        > The members move around after prayer, greeting each other with the
        expression michami dukhadam (I ask for your forgiveness).
        >
        > "We ask for forgiveness from whoever we have wronged, and we
        forgive whoever may have wronged us," explains Bhashkar Chitalia.
        >
        > The prayers go to the extent of seeking forgiveness from all living
        creatures that may have been affected by one's misdeeds - from the
        smallest living cell to the highest human being.
        >
        > It is symbolic of the Jain faith's reverence for all life in the
        universe. Jains are strict vegetarians.
        >
        > Such a deep view of the living world in Jainism - a sister religion
        of Hinduism - is said to have inspired Mahatma Gandhi, a Gujarati
        himself, to adopt non-violence in his historic campaign against
        colonial British rule.
        >
        > Jainism's main figure is the ascetic Mahavir, a contemporary of the
        Buddha, who lived in India some 2,600 years ago.
        >
        > Although the religion contributed to much of the art and
        architecture of the Indian sub-continent, there are today only five
        million Jains in the world.
        >
        > About a thousand Jains live in Malaysia today, and many trace their
        ethnic ancestry to Gujarat in India.
        >
        > The history of the community in Malaysia is closely tied to that of
        the Jains in Singapore who today number about 700. Interestingly,
        Singapore's Inter-Religious Organisation (IRO) recently recognised
        Jainism as one of 10 main religions in the island-state.
        >
        > Dr Jitendra Tejani, a medical practitioner in Penang who fasted for
        six days during 'paryushan', explains that the human body has an
        immense ability to adapt in times of fasting.
        >
        > "When you take in food, the nourishments are kept in stores within
        your body. These stores are converted to energy.
        >
        > "For some reason, the stores have the ability to manage when the
        body stops taking food," said Tejani, 52, a past president of the
        Rotary Club of Tanjung Bungah, Penang.
        >
        > The fasting effectively induces minimum energy usage and optimum
        recycling from the stores.
        >
        > He adds that the fasting also rests the body's systems from the
        metabolic rigours of digestion, deposition, absorption, excretion and
        evacuation.
        >
        > "If you believe, your mind should be able to influence the body and
        help it balance its energies."
        >
        >
        > --------------------------------------------------------------------
        ------------
        >
        > From tragedy to priesthood
        >
        > THE first Malaysian to be ordained as a Jain priest was an ordinary
        Penangite in the 1940s who was severely affected by the atrocities of
        the Japanese army during the occupation of Malaya.
        >
        > The late Ratilal Muni Gathani was in his mid-20s and helping his
        family business in George Town's King Street when the Japanese
        invaded.
        >
        > His eldest brother was killed by a Japanese bomb which fell in
        Penang Street, and the tragedy moved him deeply.
        >
        > Ratilal's nephew, retired headmaster Shashikant Gathani, 65,
        remembers his uncle vividly till today.
        >
        > "When my eldest uncle was killed, they could not find his body even
        though they searched for months," recalls Shashikant.
        >
        > Ratilal was the youngest in the family. He was so struck that he
        renounced all worldly possessions and went to India, seeking to
        understand life through Jainism.
        >
        > "He never came back after that," Shashikant says. "I visited him in
        1990 in Kharagpur where he was then staying, and found he still spoke
        fluent Malay." Ratilal passed away in Calcutta soon after.
        >
      • ymalaiya
        Let me add some interesting facts. I have read that Acharya Rajendra Suri, of Tristutika Gachchha, who wrote the famous 9200 page Abhidhan-Rajendra Kosh, used
        Message 3 of 6 , Oct 10, 2006
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          Let me add some interesting facts.

          I have read that Acharya Rajendra Suri, of Tristutika Gachchha, who
          wrote the famous 9200 page Abhidhan-Rajendra Kosh, used to visit Sri
          Lanka when he was a householder gem merchant.

          I recently read somehwere that a Digambar monk in the sangh of
          Acharya Vidyasagar, was a software professional in Atlanta, USA for
          a while before his diksha.

          Yashwant



          --- In jainlist@yahoogroups.com, "mehul_turakhia"
          <mehul_turakhia@...> wrote:
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          > Dear friends,
          > Jaya jinendra
          > Interesting and inspiring article from anishji .
          >
          > It is likely that Ratilal muni from Malaysia mentioned in the
          > article is of Sthanakwasi Gondal sampradaya in Gujarat as many
          > saints from this sampradaya had traveled towards Kolkatta
          including
          > One Ratilal muni from gondal sampradaya himself .
          >
          > It is heard that there is one more saint Champak muni who was
          > previous Acharya of Barvala sampradaya from Gujarat, who was in
          > Penang Malayasia ( could be around 1930s ), prior to his diksha
          for
          > some time. He is already met with Kaal dharma (passed away).
          >
          > In fact in agams it is found that there are many many shravaks
          > (Present life in animal forms ) spread out in universe at
          different
          > locations, who attain special knowledge due to external apparent
          > causes ( nimitta ) , by which they can see previous births (
          jati
          > smaran gyan ). They adopt vrats again and try to follow different
          > vrats with great loyalty. (Bhagawati ang agam ) Many finally
          adopt
          > santhara in the end and become aradhak too . They are most likely
          > scattered and isolated lives only. They are found in distant
          oceans
          > and land masses as per jain cosmology . Our present jain
          population
          > is quite small in numbers compared to their numbers.
          >
          > Mehul
          >
          >
          >
        • mehul_turakhia
          Dear friends, Some more info.. 1. In the swetambar derawasi side, couple of years back one very rich merchant from Africa took diksha with the gachchha of
          Message 4 of 6 , Oct 11, 2006
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            Dear friends,
            Some more info..

            1. In the swetambar derawasi side, couple of years back one very rich
            merchant from Africa took diksha with the gachchha of Abhaya sagarji
            of Jambudwip pratishthan fame. ( I may be corrected if the gachha is
            different. ).

            2. The case of Hitruchi vijayji MS ( SD) is well known during the
            diksha given in Mumbai under Ach. Prem Suri MS. I think we was the
            last disciple of Acharya.

            3. In the Gyan gachha of sthanakwasi side, about 9-10 years back one
            elderly couple from Jaipur took diksha . The present name of saint is
            Shalibhadraji. He had traveled in 40+ countries as he was associated
            with diamond trade prior to diksha. The majority of wealth was
            donated to trust. The mother was in sansar that time. Couple of
            years, later mother also took diksha and accepted santhara and met
            with kaal dharma.

            4. There are cases of some sadhvis in Gyan gachha who have traveled
            to Singapore, Hongkong prior to diksha.

            There could be many more inspiration cases.

            The point is vairagya is not a function of external exposure/
            attachment / belongings etc. but an intrinsic detachment even in
            present times.

            I stand corrected for any errors in information conveyed.

            Mehul



            --- In jainlist@yahoogroups.com, "ymalaiya" <ymalaiya@...> wrote:
            >
            > Let me add some interesting facts.
            >
            > I have read that Acharya Rajendra Suri, of Tristutika Gachchha, who
            > wrote the famous 9200 page Abhidhan-Rajendra Kosh, used to visit Sri
            > Lanka when he was a householder gem merchant.
            >
            > I recently read somehwere that a Digambar monk in the sangh of
            > Acharya Vidyasagar, was a software professional in Atlanta, USA for
            > a while before his diksha.
            >
            > Yashwant
            >
            >
            >
            > --- In jainlist@yahoogroups.com, "mehul_turakhia"
            > <mehul_turakhia@> wrote:
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > > Dear friends,
            > > Jaya jinendra
            > > Interesting and inspiring article from anishji .
            > >
            > > It is likely that Ratilal muni from Malaysia mentioned in the
            > > article is of Sthanakwasi Gondal sampradaya in Gujarat as many
            > > saints from this sampradaya had traveled towards Kolkatta
            > including
            > > One Ratilal muni from gondal sampradaya himself .
            > >
            > > It is heard that there is one more saint Champak muni who was
            > > previous Acharya of Barvala sampradaya from Gujarat, who was in
            > > Penang Malayasia ( could be around 1930s ), prior to his diksha
            > for
            > > some time. He is already met with Kaal dharma (passed away).
            > >
            > > In fact in agams it is found that there are many many shravaks
            > > (Present life in animal forms ) spread out in universe at
            > different
            > > locations, who attain special knowledge due to external apparent
            > > causes ( nimitta ) , by which they can see previous births (
            > jati
            > > smaran gyan ). They adopt vrats again and try to follow different
            > > vrats with great loyalty. (Bhagawati ang agam ) Many finally
            > adopt
            > > santhara in the end and become aradhak too . They are most likely
            > > scattered and isolated lives only. They are found in distant
            > oceans
            > > and land masses as per jain cosmology . Our present jain
            > population
            > > is quite small in numbers compared to their numbers.
            > >
            > > Mehul
            > >
            > >
            > >
            >
          • Anish A Shah
            Jai Jinendra, Most of our monks, Swetamber and Digamber monks are quite learned and come from various fields such as engineers, doctors, post graduates and
            Message 5 of 6 , Oct 12, 2006
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              Jai Jinendra,

              Most of our monks, Swetamber and Digamber monks are quite learned and come
              from various fields such as engineers, doctors, post graduates and from rich
              and business families as well as middle class and and poor. Since Jainism is
              a rational faith, it appeals to the educated and attracts intellectual
              people.

              Regards,

              Anish



              ----- Original Message -----
              From: "ymalaiya" <ymalaiya@...>
              To: <jainlist@yahoogroups.com>
              Sent: Wednesday, October 11, 2006 12:18 AM
              Subject: [JainList] Re: Jainism in/ for Malaysia and elsewhere


              > Let me add some interesting facts.
              >
              > I have read that Acharya Rajendra Suri, of Tristutika Gachchha, who
              > wrote the famous 9200 page Abhidhan-Rajendra Kosh, used to visit Sri
              > Lanka when he was a householder gem merchant.
              >
              > I recently read somehwere that a Digambar monk in the sangh of
              > Acharya Vidyasagar, was a software professional in Atlanta, USA for
              > a while before his diksha.
              >
              > Yashwant
              >
              >
              >
              > --- In jainlist@yahoogroups.com, "mehul_turakhia"
              > <mehul_turakhia@...> wrote:
              >>
              >>
              >>
              >>
              >>
              >> Dear friends,
              >> Jaya jinendra
              >> Interesting and inspiring article from anishji .
              >>
              >> It is likely that Ratilal muni from Malaysia mentioned in the
              >> article is of Sthanakwasi Gondal sampradaya in Gujarat as many
              >> saints from this sampradaya had traveled towards Kolkatta
              > including
              >> One Ratilal muni from gondal sampradaya himself .
              >>
              >> It is heard that there is one more saint Champak muni who was
              >> previous Acharya of Barvala sampradaya from Gujarat, who was in
              >> Penang Malayasia ( could be around 1930s ), prior to his diksha
              > for
              >> some time. He is already met with Kaal dharma (passed away).
              >>
              >> In fact in agams it is found that there are many many shravaks
              >> (Present life in animal forms ) spread out in universe at
              > different
              >> locations, who attain special knowledge due to external apparent
              >> causes ( nimitta ) , by which they can see previous births (
              > jati
              >> smaran gyan ). They adopt vrats again and try to follow different
              >> vrats with great loyalty. (Bhagawati ang agam ) Many finally
              > adopt
              >> santhara in the end and become aradhak too . They are most likely
              >> scattered and isolated lives only. They are found in distant
              > oceans
              >> and land masses as per jain cosmology . Our present jain
              > population
              >> is quite small in numbers compared to their numbers.
              >>
              >> Mehul
              >>
              >>
            • mehul turakhia
              Dear friends, Some more facts and observations on educational back ground of saints . Following Quadruplets / combinations exist theoratically. 1. Less
              Message 6 of 6 , Oct 13, 2006
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                Dear friends,

                Some more facts and observations on educational back
                ground of saints .

                Following Quadruplets / combinations exist
                theoratically.

                1. Less education before diksha - less kshyopasam /
                less scriptural learnings . Simple sevabhavi saints
                with knowledge of 5 samiti and 3 guptis.

                2. Less education before diksha (just reading and
                counting basic skills) and high scriptural knowledge
                after diksha due to efforts and kshyopasam including
                complex knowledge of interpretation of scriptural
                texts.

                3. high education before diksha ( materialistic
                degrees like engineers, MBAs , CA, professors,
                lawyers etc. as wells as spiritural jain and non jain
                darshans ) - high kshyopasam / high scriptural
                learnings post diksha .

                4. high education before diksha ( materialistic
                degrees like engineers, MBAs , CA, professors,
                lawyers etc.) --
                low kshyopasam / low scriptural learnings.

                All the cases are seen in the different sanghs /
                sects in present times also . ( However 4 th is less
                likely .

                Many saints / sadhvis study later after diksha for
                PHDs also.

                regards,
                mehul


                --- Anish A Shah <anishshah19@...> wrote:

                > Jai Jinendra,
                >
                > Most of our monks, Swetamber and Digamber monks are
                > quite learned and come
                > from various fields such as engineers, doctors, post
                > graduates and from rich
                > and business families as well as middle class and
                > and poor. Since Jainism is
                > a rational faith, it appeals to the educated and
                > attracts intellectual
                > people.
                >
                > Regards,
                >
                > Anish
                >
                >
                >
                > ----- Original Message -----
                > From: "ymalaiya" <ymalaiya@...>
                > To: <jainlist@yahoogroups.com>
                > Sent: Wednesday, October 11, 2006 12:18 AM
                > Subject: [JainList] Re: Jainism in/ for Malaysia and
                > elsewhere
                >
                >
                > > Let me add some interesting facts.
                > >
                > > I have read that Acharya Rajendra Suri, of
                > Tristutika Gachchha, who
                > > wrote the famous 9200 page Abhidhan-Rajendra Kosh,
                > used to visit Sri
                > > Lanka when he was a householder gem merchant.
                > >
                > > I recently read somehwere that a Digambar monk in
                > the sangh of
                > > Acharya Vidyasagar, was a software professional in
                > Atlanta, USA for
                > > a while before his diksha.
                > >
                > > Yashwant
                > >
                > >
                > >
                > > --- In jainlist@yahoogroups.com, "mehul_turakhia"
                > > <mehul_turakhia@...> wrote:
                > >>
                > >>
                > >>
                > >>
                > >>
                > >> Dear friends,
                > >> Jaya jinendra
                > >> Interesting and inspiring article from anishji .
                > >>
                > >> It is likely that Ratilal muni from Malaysia
                > mentioned in the
                > >> article is of Sthanakwasi Gondal sampradaya in
                > Gujarat as many
                > >> saints from this sampradaya had traveled towards
                > Kolkatta
                > > including
                > >> One Ratilal muni from gondal sampradaya himself .
                > >>
                > >> It is heard that there is one more saint Champak
                > muni who was
                > >> previous Acharya of Barvala sampradaya from
                > Gujarat, who was in
                > >> Penang Malayasia ( could be around 1930s ), prior
                > to his diksha
                > > for
                > >> some time. He is already met with Kaal dharma
                > (passed away).
                > >>
                > >> In fact in agams it is found that there are many
                > many shravaks
                > >> (Present life in animal forms ) spread out in
                > universe at
                > > different
                > >> locations, who attain special knowledge due to
                > external apparent
                > >> causes ( nimitta ) , by which they can see
                > previous births (
                > > jati
                > >> smaran gyan ). They adopt vrats again and try to
                > follow different
                > >> vrats with great loyalty. (Bhagawati ang agam )
                > Many finally
                > > adopt
                > >> santhara in the end and become aradhak too .
                > They are most likely
                > >> scattered and isolated lives only. They are
                > found in distant
                > > oceans
                > >> and land masses as per jain cosmology . Our
                > present jain
                > > population
                > >> is quite small in numbers compared to their
                > numbers.
                > >>
                > >> Mehul
                > >>
                > >>
                >
                >


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