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Re: Union Troops from Jackson County

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  • Jerry Birchfield
    Sylvia, I also had a family member in the 1st AL Cav. Here is the link where I found a lot information on him:
    Message 1 of 20 , Mar 4, 2008
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      Sylvia,
      I also had a family member in the 1st AL Cav. Here is the link
      where I found a lot information on him:
      http://www.archives.state.al.us/referenc/military.html
      Good luck in your search!!!

      Jerry Birchfield


      --- In jacksongenealogy@yahoogroups.com, "Sylvia King" <kingirby@...>
      wrote:
      >
      > Does anyone have any information on Jackson County men serving in
      the union army during the Civil War? I was researching an uncle,
      John M. IRBY who served in the 1st Alabama Calvary according to some
      records I have found.
      > I have a tintype picture with the notation that he died about 1864
      in Fayetteville, Arkansas. Any information would be appreciated.
      > Sylvia Lacy King
      >
      > researching, Irby, Wallace in Jackson County.
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      >
    • Jimmie Ryan
      Since I do not know what you are specifically looking for; here are some of the web sites that came up during a Google search; I am sure that within some of
      Message 2 of 20 , Mar 5, 2008
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        Since I do not know what you are specifically looking for; here are some of
        the web sites that came up during a "Google" search; I am sure that within
        some of this information you should be able to locate what you are looking
        for. I am interested in your Irby, I believe I have a few in my database
        for this area - but I have not checked yours in particular. Let me know if
        I can be of any help, do you have a data of birth for your Irby?

        Jimmie Ryan
        Elijah Brazier b 1776 NC (1830 Blount Census)

        http://www.annistonstar.com/opinion/2008/as-letters-0214-speakout-8b13s1224.
        htm

        Speak Out ... Yankee soldiers from Alabama - Readers' fiery reactions:
        records Union Troops from Alabama.

        http://www.nps.gov/archive/vick/us_reg/ustroops.htm

        This one references:
        UNION TROOPS,
        VICKSBURG CAMPAIGN

        ALABAMA


        1st Alabama Cavalry, 1st Battalion, Companies A, B, C, D, E, F, & G
        1st Alabama Siege Artillery, Company A
        1st Alabama Infantry [African Descent]

        http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1st_Alabama_Cavalry_Regiment_%28Union%29

        The 1st Alabama Cavalry Regiment was a cavalry regiment recruited from
        southern loyalists that served in the Union Army during the American Civil
        War.

        Service

        The 1st Alabama Cavalry was raised from Alabama Unionists at Huntsville,
        Alabama and Memphis, Tennessee in October, 1862 after Federal troops
        occupied the area. It was attached to the XVI Corps in various divisions
        until November 1864, when it became part of the XV Corps. During this time,
        its duties mostly consisted of scouting, raiding, reconnaissance, flank
        guard, and providing screening to the infantry while on the march.

        The regiment was selected by Major General William T. Sherman to be his
        escort as he began his march to the sea. It was assigned to the Third
        Division of the Cavalry Corps, Military Division of the Mississippi in
        January 1865. It fought at the battles of Monroe's Crossroads and
        Bentonville and was present at the surrender of the Army of Tennessee at the
        Bennett Place. It was sent to the District of Northern Alabama, Department
        of the Cumberland in June 1865.

        The regiment was mustered out of service at Huntsville, Alabama on October
        20, 1865, with only 397 men present. Out of the 2,000 men who served in the
        unit during the course of the war, 345 were killed in action, died in
        prison, of disease or other non-battle causes, 88 were captured, and 279
        deserted, with no accurate count of the number of wounded.

        Women

        The women of the Alabama Unionists who joined the Federal military helped
        with long distance communication networks, and they were able to move freely
        from town to town because of their gender. When these women lost their
        husbands, it was often a struggle to survive, and they were completely
        ostracized by the pro-Southern society.

        Slaves

        "Regardless of the Union's ambivalence toward slaves and slavery, black men
        and women in Alabama" saw the Union occupation as the surest path to
        freedom. [1] With regards to Union foraging and the practicing of hard war,
        while some slaves and free blacks "viewed the loss of goods as negligible in
        light of the security and opportunities. Federal occupation brought them,"
        for many, "loss of even small property meant increased vulnerability to
        whatever white people won the war."[

        List of Alabama Union Civil War regiments
        From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
        Jump to: navigation, search
        This is a list of regiments from the U.S. state of Alabama that fought in
        the Union Army during the American Civil War (1861-1865):

        http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_Alabama_Union_Civil_War_regiments

        Artillery

        1st Regiment Alabama Siege Artillery (African Descent)

        Cavalry

        1st Alabama Cavalry Regiment (Union)

        Infantry

        1st Alabama Volunteer Infantry Regiment (African Descent)
        2nd Alabama Volunteer Infantry Regiment (African Descent)
        3rd Alabama Volunteer Infantry Regiment (African Descent)
        4th Alabama Volunteer Infantry Regiment (African Descent)

        See also

        Lists of American Civil War Regiments by State
        Alabama Civil War Confederate Units
        Alabama in the American Civil War

        -----Original Message-----
        From: jacksongenealogy@yahoogroups.com
        [mailto:jacksongenealogy@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Jerry Birchfield
        Sent: Tuesday, March 04, 2008 10:35 PM
        To: jacksongenealogy@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: [jacksongenealogy] Re: Union Troops from Jackson County

        Sylvia,
        I also had a family member in the 1st AL Cav. Here is the link
        where I found a lot information on him:
        http://www.archives.state.al.us/referenc/military.html
        Good luck in your search!!!

        Jerry Birchfield


        --- In jacksongenealogy@yahoogroups.com, "Sylvia King" <kingirby@...>
        wrote:
        >
        > Does anyone have any information on Jackson County men serving in
        the union army during the Civil War? I was researching an uncle,
        John M. IRBY who served in the 1st Alabama Calvary according to some
        records I have found.
        > I have a tintype picture with the notation that he died about 1864
        in Fayetteville, Arkansas. Any information would be appreciated.
        > Sylvia Lacy King
        >
        > researching, Irby, Wallace in Jackson County.
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        >





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      • Linda Wilson
        John M Irby Age: 21 Rank at enlistment: Private Company Assignment: G 2/15/1863 Enlisted Chewalla, TN 4/10/1863 Prisoner
        Message 3 of 20 , Mar 5, 2008
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          John M Irby

          Age: 21 Rank at enlistment: Private Company Assignment: G 2/15/1863 Enlisted Chewalla, TN 4/10/1863 Prisoner of War 10/26/1863 Missing in Action Vincent's Crossroads, MS 11/26/1863 Mustered Out Memphis, TN

          Joseph A Irby

          Age: 18 Rank at enlistment: Private Company Assignment: G 2/15/1863 Enlisted Chewalla, TN 4/10/1863 Prisoner of War 11/26/1863 Mustered Out Memphis, TNNotes:
          Notation states, "see also Vo. B, 1st Miss. Mt'd Rifles."







          ---------------------------------
          Never miss a thing. Make Yahoo your homepage.

          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • clay gullatt
          1st Cavalry website. www.1stalabamacavalryusv.com History and rosters. Clay [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          Message 4 of 20 , Mar 5, 2008
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            1st Cavalry website.

            www.1stalabamacavalryusv.com

            History and rosters.

            Clay


            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • clay gullatt
            Seem to have got at space where this isn t one. www.1stalabamacavalryusv.com [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            Message 5 of 20 , Mar 5, 2008
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              Seem to have got at space where this isn't one.

              www.1stalabamacavalryusv.com


              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • clay gullatt
              Wrong again. Just got out of the hospital not working at 100%. www.1stalabamacavalryusv.com [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              Message 6 of 20 , Mar 5, 2008
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                Wrong again. Just got out of the hospital not working at 100%.

                www.1stalabamacavalryusv.com


                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              • RON aKINS
                Hi Clay,It is interesting that there were Union soldiers from Jackson County.Dade County,GA which is next door was the first county in the South to secede fom
                Message 7 of 20 , Mar 5, 2008
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                  Hi Clay,It is interesting that there were Union soldiers from Jackson County.Dade County,GA which is next door was the first county in the South to secede fom the Union.Were there many slave owners in Jackson County?

                  clay gullatt <blackcloud27030@...> wrote: Wrong again. Just got out of the hospital not working at 100%.

                  www.1stalabamacavalryusv.com


                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]




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                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                • Jimmie Ryan
                  Interesting also that in the listing provided on the Irby s they had Prisoner of War in the record, were they forced to fire against there Southern Brothers?
                  Message 8 of 20 , Mar 6, 2008
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                    Interesting also that in the listing provided on the Irby's they had
                    "Prisoner of War" in the record, were they forced to fire against there
                    Southern Brothers? Were they under treat of death if they did not
                    participate in the occupying army of the North. It seems our families of
                    this time had many hard questions posed to them, and many hardships to bear.

                    Jimmie
                    Elijah Brazier b 1800 SC d 1869 Jackson, Alabama

                    -----Original Message-----
                    From: jacksongenealogy@yahoogroups.com
                    [mailto:jacksongenealogy@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of RON aKINS
                    Sent: Wednesday, March 05, 2008 10:29 PM
                    To: jacksongenealogy@yahoogroups.com
                    Subject: RE: [jacksongenealogy] Re: Union Troops from Jackson County

                    Hi Clay,It is interesting that there were Union soldiers from Jackson
                    County.Dade County,GA which is next door was the first county in the South
                    to secede fom the Union.Were there many slave owners in Jackson County?

                    clay gullatt <blackcloud27030@...> wrote: Wrong again. Just got out
                    of the hospital not working at 100%.

                    www.1stalabamacavalryusv.com


                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]




                    Yahoo! Groups Links






                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]




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                  • paula stockebrand
                    http://www.1stalabamacavalryusv.com/ RON aKINS wrote: Hi Clay,It is interesting that there were Union soldiers from Jackson
                    Message 9 of 20 , Mar 6, 2008
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                      http://www.1stalabamacavalryusv.com/

                      RON aKINS <akinsron@...> wrote: Hi Clay,It is interesting that there were Union soldiers from Jackson County.Dade County,GA which is next door was the first county in the South to secede fom the Union.Were there many slave owners in Jackson County?

                      clay gullatt <blackcloud27030@...> wrote: Wrong again. Just got out of the hospital not working at 100%.

                      www.1stalabamacavalryusv.com

                      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

                      Yahoo! Groups Links

                      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]






                      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                    • clay gullatt
                      Jimmie Quite the contrary, John M. Irby was taken prisoner by the Confederate Troops. All of the 1st Alabama were supporters of the Union and volunteers. Most
                      Message 10 of 20 , Mar 6, 2008
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                        Jimmie

                        Quite the contrary, John M. Irby was taken prisoner by the Confederate Troops. All of the 1st Alabama were supporters of the Union and volunteers. Most volunteered when the Governor sent conscription troops to force them to enlisted on the Southern side.

                        Clay

                        To answer Ron Atkins question.

                        Jackson Co. in 1860 had 14,858 whites and 3411 slaves. There were about 55 people with more than 20 slaves. The most 70 owned by C.C. Clay who was from Madison Co. if I remember correctly. S. J. Jones owned 52. F. A. Province owned 46. Thos. J. Robinson 39. Jackson Co. had nothing like what they had in the "black belt" to the south.

                        Northern Alabama, Eastern Tennessee and Western North Carolina had strong supporters of the Union. A lot of this area will not support large scale cotton growing. These three areas consisted of mostly small farmers most of whom owned no slaves and they saw no reason why they should fight to benefit the large plantation slave owners. I also think that much of the Jackson Co's population was made up of a large number of people who came there to get away from control by the government, were very independent and would have resisted being told what to do. More support for the South came when Union troops invaded and did a great deal of destruction in Jackson Co one report that only fence posts were left in and around Bellefonte.

                        Whether anyone likes it or not those were the the facts and realities.

                        My GGGrandmother Catherine (Mitchell) Gullatt owned 3 slaves, her son William own 5, all except 1 was of the same family (Burt and Peggy Gullatt) and likely descendants of slaves John and Catherine Gullatt had when they moved from Fairfax Co. VA to Lincoln Co. GA in 1800 then to Jackson Co. in 1816/17 (then the Cherokee Nation).

                        On the other side of the coin of my GGGrandmother Martha "Patsy" (Phillips) Harper widow of John Payne Harper it was said by witnesses on her application for a War of 1812 was a strongly for the Union, the whole family was strongly in support of the US government and the leading Union family in county, her son in law Thomas Latham and two of her grandsons went into the Union Army, In all the time of the Rebellion I never heard her utter one sentiment disloyal to the the Union or authorities of the US but strongly adhered to the government of the US. The Harpers were descendants of Quakers most of whom did not believe in slavery. After the War she when to Van Zandt Co. TX to live with her son in law Henry Tipton and his daughter and near sons Andrew J. and Robert T.. She returned to Jackson Co. sometime in the 1870s. In 1880 she is listed as age 84 living with a Yankee family Henry P. and John F. Wicks from NY. She died in 1883/84.

                        Her son in law and my GGrandfather James M. Gullatt was taken prisoner by Union troops with two others and the report said they were with arms. Great-Aunt Jane (Gullatt) Kirby said that James M. served in the Civil War. No record of his service except he did receive some type of pension from the government. It may have been for the Mexican Warn. I always though he was probably a spy for the South.

                        Great-Great-Uncle William Gullatt is listed as a Union Loyalist even though he owned slaves. On the 1880 census Peggy Gullatt, some of her children and grandchildren are living next to William. The Grandchildren are listed as mulattoes so I have thought that they were probably William's children, he had no others.

                        Also listed as a Union Loyalist was Henry H. Coalson who married Juliet Gullatt.

                        My Great-Great-Aunt Nancy (Gullatt) Airheart had 5 sons 3 of whom served the South and 2 the Union. That must have made for some interesting family conversations.

                        There is nothing simplistic about the Civil War.

                        You have to admit that Southern families are complex and interesting.

                        I am sure that many others in the Group have similar stories. I remember one where their Union ancestors had to flee in the night and hide in caves until they could escape Jackson Co. Yes, passions and tempers ran high.

                        I do not want this to turn into a discussion of why the war was fought or who was right or wrong there are other forums for that. I know there are strong feelings on both sides. Maybe it's that Quaker heritage in me coming out that insists on peace and harmony.

                        Clay


                        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                      • Jimmie Ryan
                        Thank you for your correction, Clay I so appreciate it. My reference was to the listing provided to the list as a reference for John Irby s involvement in the
                        Message 11 of 20 , Mar 7, 2008
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                          Thank you for your correction, Clay I so appreciate it. My reference was to
                          the listing provided to the list as a reference for John Irby's involvement
                          in the unit; I believed on the second line it stated "Prisoner of War." My
                          family lost 2 to the Civil War, William and Ellis Brazier and yes this area
                          was alive with activity since it seemed to be the main battle line for the
                          Union; and, also the connection to a different scale of trains; which helped
                          the south starve off the Union advance. The importance of the rail head at
                          both Jackson County, and Atlanta were both the objectives, I believe, of the
                          Union in there trust into the south.

                          My ggg grandfather, James Belton Lovless watched the burning of Atlanta as
                          he left for Indiana. After the war he returned to Blount County to live out
                          his life until 1900. Of course the third death for my Brazier family was
                          Elijah b 1800 d 1868 on his farm in Maynard Cove. It is said that his wife,
                          Betty Stephens Brazier Messer would ware black until her death in 1884, even
                          after she married William Messer of Jackson. It is interesting you have
                          Mitchell's and Robinson in the reference as they along with S J Jones are
                          allied families of Elijah Brazier b 1776 d 1859, all seemed to come from
                          Madison as it appears the staging area for those that would settle this
                          Indian area. Cuz Jimmie

                          -----Original Message-----
                          From: jacksongenealogy@yahoogroups.com
                          [mailto:jacksongenealogy@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of clay gullatt
                          Sent: Thursday, March 06, 2008 6:53 PM
                          To: jacksongenealogy@yahoogroups.com
                          Subject: RE: [jacksongenealogy] Re: Union Troops from Jackson County - POWs
                          - Slavery - Jackson Co. Union Supporters

                          Jimmie

                          Quite the contrary, John M. Irby was taken prisoner by the Confederate
                          Troops. All of the 1st Alabama were supporters of the Union and volunteers.
                          Most volunteered when the Governor sent conscription troops to force them to
                          enlisted on the Southern side.

                          Clay

                          To answer Ron Atkins question.

                          Jackson Co. in 1860 had 14,858 whites and 3411 slaves. There were about 55
                          people with more than 20 slaves. The most 70 owned by C.C. Clay who was from
                          Madison Co. if I remember correctly. S. J. Jones owned 52. F. A. Province
                          owned 46. Thos. J. Robinson 39. Jackson Co. had nothing like what they had
                          in the "black belt" to the south.

                          Northern Alabama, Eastern Tennessee and Western North Carolina had strong
                          supporters of the Union. A lot of this area will not support large scale
                          cotton growing. These three areas consisted of mostly small farmers most of
                          whom owned no slaves and they saw no reason why they should fight to benefit
                          the large plantation slave owners. I also think that much of the Jackson
                          Co's population was made up of a large number of people who came there to
                          get away from control by the government, were very independent and would
                          have resisted being told what to do. More support for the South came when
                          Union troops invaded and did a great deal of destruction in Jackson Co one
                          report that only fence posts were left in and around Bellefonte.

                          Whether anyone likes it or not those were the the facts and realities.

                          My GGGrandmother Catherine (Mitchell) Gullatt owned 3 slaves, her son
                          William own 5, all except 1 was of the same family (Burt and Peggy Gullatt)
                          and likely descendants of slaves John and Catherine Gullatt had when they
                          moved from Fairfax Co. VA to Lincoln Co. GA in 1800 then to Jackson Co. in
                          1816/17 (then the Cherokee Nation).

                          On the other side of the coin of my GGGrandmother Martha "Patsy" (Phillips)
                          Harper widow of John Payne Harper it was said by witnesses on her
                          application for a War of 1812 was a strongly for the Union, the whole family
                          was strongly in support of the US government and the leading Union family in
                          county, her son in law Thomas Latham and two of her grandsons went into the
                          Union Army, In all the time of the Rebellion I never heard her utter one
                          sentiment disloyal to the the Union or authorities of the US but strongly
                          adhered to the government of the US. The Harpers were descendants of
                          Quakers most of whom did not believe in slavery. After the War she when to
                          Van Zandt Co. TX to live with her son in law Henry Tipton and his daughter
                          and near sons Andrew J. and Robert T.. She returned to Jackson Co. sometime
                          in the 1870s. In 1880 she is listed as age 84 living with a Yankee family
                          Henry P. and John F. Wicks from NY. She died in 1883/84.

                          Her son in law and my GGrandfather James M. Gullatt was taken prisoner by
                          Union troops with two others and the report said they were with arms.
                          Great-Aunt Jane (Gullatt) Kirby said that James M. served in the Civil War.
                          No record of his service except he did receive some type of pension from the
                          government. It may have been for the Mexican Warn. I always though he was
                          probably a spy for the South.

                          Great-Great-Uncle William Gullatt is listed as a Union Loyalist even though
                          he owned slaves. On the 1880 census Peggy Gullatt, some of her children and
                          grandchildren are living next to William. The Grandchildren are listed as
                          mulattoes so I have thought that they were probably William's children, he
                          had no others.

                          Also listed as a Union Loyalist was Henry H. Coalson who married Juliet
                          Gullatt.

                          My Great-Great-Aunt Nancy (Gullatt) Airheart had 5 sons 3 of whom served the
                          South and 2 the Union. That must have made for some interesting family
                          conversations.

                          There is nothing simplistic about the Civil War.

                          You have to admit that Southern families are complex and interesting.

                          I am sure that many others in the Group have similar stories. I remember one
                          where their Union ancestors had to flee in the night and hide in caves until
                          they could escape Jackson Co. Yes, passions and tempers ran high.

                          I do not want this to turn into a discussion of why the war was fought or
                          who was right or wrong there are other forums for that. I know there are
                          strong feelings on both sides. Maybe it's that Quaker heritage in me coming
                          out that insists on peace and harmony.

                          Clay


                          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]




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                        • John Green
                          Jimmie, I had often wondered why there had been so many cavalry raids in northeast Alabama and south central Tennessee. The book With Blood and Fire: Life
                          Message 12 of 20 , Mar 8, 2008
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                            Jimmie,

                            I had often wondered why there had been so many cavalry raids in
                            northeast Alabama and south central Tennessee. The book "With Blood
                            and Fire: Life behind Union Lines in Middle Tennessee 1863 -1865" by
                            Michael R. Bradley explains this very well. The Northern strategy was
                            to cut the South in half. Their occupation of middle TN gave them
                            control of the railroad that ran from Nashville to Chattanooga via
                            Stevenson Alabama. They badly needed this railroad to move supplies
                            for the siege of Chattanooga. The route from Nashville to Huntsville
                            and then on to Stevenson was much longer and the Mussel Shoals near
                            Florence prevented the use of the Tennessee River for supplies since
                            steam boats could not cross the Shoals. There were many "Bushwackers"
                            as the southern underground was termed throughout the area. The common
                            folk were caught in the middle. If they didn't help the bushwackers
                            the rebels would attack them, and if they did help, the Union
                            occupation forces attacked them. Raiding in this area by the south
                            held the invasion forces off of Chattanooga for a while, but eventually
                            the superior arms and manufacturing capability of the north broke the
                            resistance.

                            After the War, many of the former rebels, including one branch of my
                            family, moved westward to Arkansas, Texas and beyond.

                            John McCollum Green
                            On Mar 7, 2008, at 6:27 PM, Jimmie Ryan wrote:

                            > Thank you for your correction, Clay I so appreciate it. My reference
                            > was to
                            > the listing provided to the list as a reference for John Irby's
                            > involvement
                            > in the unit; I believed on the second line it stated "Prisoner of
                            > War." My
                            > family lost 2 to the Civil War, William and Ellis Brazier and yes
                            > this area
                            > was alive with activity since it seemed to be the main battle line
                            > for the
                            > Union; and, also the connection to a different scale of trains; which
                            > helped
                            > the south starve off the Union advance. The importance of the rail
                            > head at
                            > both Jackson County, and Atlanta were both the objectives, I believe,
                            > of the
                            > Union in there trust into the south.
                            >
                            > My ggg grandfather, James Belton Lovless watched the burning of
                            > Atlanta as
                            > he left for Indiana. After the war he returned to Blount County to
                            > live out
                            > his life until 1900. Of course the third death for my Brazier family
                            > was
                            > Elijah b 1800 d 1868 on his farm in Maynard Cove. It is said that his
                            > wife,
                            > Betty Stephens Brazier Messer would ware black until her death in
                            > 1884, even
                            > after she married William Messer of Jackson. It is interesting you
                            > have
                            > Mitchell's and Robinson in the reference as they along with S J Jones
                            > are
                            > allied families of Elijah Brazier b 1776 d 1859, all seemed to come
                            > from
                            > Madison as it appears the staging area for those that would settle
                            > this
                            > Indian area. Cuz Jimmie
                            >
                            > -----Original Message-----
                            > From: jacksongenealogy@yahoogroups.com
                            > [mailto:jacksongenealogy@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of clay gullatt
                            > Sent: Thursday, March 06, 2008 6:53 PM
                            > To: jacksongenealogy@yahoogroups.com
                            > Subject: RE: [jacksongenealogy] Re: Union Troops from Jackson County
                            > - POWs
                            > - Slavery - Jackson Co. Union Supporters
                            >
                            > Jimmie
                            >
                            > Quite the contrary, John M. Irby was taken prisoner by the Confederate
                            > Troops. All of the 1st Alabama were supporters of the Union and
                            > volunteers.
                            > Most volunteered when the Governor sent conscription troops to force
                            > them to
                            > enlisted on the Southern side.
                            >
                            > Clay
                            >
                            > To answer Ron Atkins question.
                            >
                            > Jackson Co. in 1860 had 14,858 whites and 3411 slaves. There were
                            > about 55
                            > people with more than 20 slaves. The most 70 owned by C.C. Clay who
                            > was from
                            > Madison Co. if I remember correctly. S. J. Jones owned 52. F. A.
                            > Province
                            > owned 46. Thos. J. Robinson 39. Jackson Co. had nothing like what
                            > they had
                            > in the "black belt" to the south.
                            >
                            > Northern Alabama, Eastern Tennessee and Western North Carolina had
                            > strong
                            > supporters of the Union. A lot of this area will not support large
                            > scale
                            > cotton growing. These three areas consisted of mostly small farmers
                            > most of
                            > whom owned no slaves and they saw no reason why they should fight to
                            > benefit
                            > the large plantation slave owners. I also think that much of the
                            > Jackson
                            > Co's population was made up of a large number of people who came
                            > there to
                            > get away from control by the government, were very independent and
                            > would
                            > have resisted being told what to do. More support for the South came
                            > when
                            > Union troops invaded and did a great deal of destruction in Jackson
                            > Co one
                            > report that only fence posts were left in and around Bellefonte.
                            >
                            > Whether anyone likes it or not those were the the facts and realities.
                            >
                            > My GGGrandmother Catherine (Mitchell) Gullatt owned 3 slaves, her son
                            > William own 5, all except 1 was of the same family (Burt and Peggy
                            > Gullatt)
                            > and likely descendants of slaves John and Catherine Gullatt had when
                            > they
                            > moved from Fairfax Co. VA to Lincoln Co. GA in 1800 then to Jackson
                            > Co. in
                            > 1816/17 (then the Cherokee Nation).
                            >
                            > On the other side of the coin of my GGGrandmother Martha "Patsy"
                            > (Phillips)
                            > Harper widow of John Payne Harper it was said by witnesses on her
                            > application for a War of 1812 was a strongly for the Union, the whole
                            > family
                            > was strongly in support of the US government and the leading Union
                            > family in
                            > county, her son in law Thomas Latham and two of her grandsons went
                            > into the
                            > Union Army, In all the time of the Rebellion I never heard her utter
                            > one
                            > sentiment disloyal to the the Union or authorities of the US but
                            > strongly
                            > adhered to the government of the US. The Harpers were descendants of
                            > Quakers most of whom did not believe in slavery. After the War she
                            > when to
                            > Van Zandt Co. TX to live with her son in law Henry Tipton and his
                            > daughter
                            > and near sons Andrew J. and Robert T.. She returned to Jackson Co.
                            > sometime
                            > in the 1870s. In 1880 she is listed as age 84 living with a Yankee
                            > family
                            > Henry P. and John F. Wicks from NY. She died in 1883/84.
                            >
                            > Her son in law and my GGrandfather James M. Gullatt was taken
                            > prisoner by
                            > Union troops with two others and the report said they were with arms.
                            > Great-Aunt Jane (Gullatt) Kirby said that James M. served in the
                            > Civil War.
                            > No record of his service except he did receive some type of pension
                            > from the
                            > government. It may have been for the Mexican Warn. I always though he
                            > was
                            > probably a spy for the South.
                            >
                            > Great-Great-Uncle William Gullatt is listed as a Union Loyalist even
                            > though
                            > he owned slaves. On the 1880 census Peggy Gullatt, some of her
                            > children and
                            > grandchildren are living next to William. The Grandchildren are
                            > listed as
                            > mulattoes so I have thought that they were probably William's
                            > children, he
                            > had no others.
                            >
                            > Also listed as a Union Loyalist was Henry H. Coalson who married
                            > Juliet
                            > Gullatt.
                            >
                            > My Great-Great-Aunt Nancy (Gullatt) Airheart had 5 sons 3 of whom
                            > served the
                            > South and 2 the Union. That must have made for some interesting family
                            > conversations.
                            >
                            > There is nothing simplistic about the Civil War.
                            >
                            > You have to admit that Southern families are complex and interesting.
                            >
                            > I am sure that many others in the Group have similar stories. I
                            > remember one
                            > where their Union ancestors had to flee in the night and hide in
                            > caves until
                            > they could escape Jackson Co. Yes, passions and tempers ran high.
                            >
                            > I do not want this to turn into a discussion of why the war was
                            > fought or
                            > who was right or wrong there are other forums for that. I know there
                            > are
                            > strong feelings on both sides. Maybe it's that Quaker heritage in me
                            > coming
                            > out that insists on peace and harmony.
                            >
                            > Clay
                            >
                            >
                            > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                            >
                            > Yahoo! Groups Links
                            >
                            >
                            >

                            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                          • madolyn jysele
                            My Great Great Grandfather fought for the Union Army. He died at Bridgeport, Al - but he didn t die in battle he died of dysentery from digging ditches. The
                            Message 13 of 20 , Mar 26, 2008
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                              My Great Great Grandfather fought for the Union Army. He died at Bridgeport, Al - but he didn't die in battle he died of dysentery from digging ditches. The people of Jackson County did not take likely to a Union sympathizer. My Great Great Grandfather was stabbed at his home, the people burn't his home, then when they moved the stigma stayed with them. Every year they have a re-enactment of the war in Bridgeport, Al and we have a Fort here in Stevenson, Al called Fort Harker.

                              I also wanted to tell you that the Archives in Washington, Dc is a place to look for much information. My Great Great Grandmother filed so many papers right up to her death, I can read those papers and virtually live her life for many years. She even filed papers for a corn crop that was taken and she gave so much personal information that gave to me info I would not have normally had.

                              There were indeed Union soldiers from this area and they paid dearly from their neighbors......Madolyn


                              ---------------------------------
                              Never miss a thing. Make Yahoo your homepage.

                              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                            • jackie morgan
                              You didn t say his name. My family lived in Jackson County during that time as well. I know nothing of what their life was like or really which side they
                              Message 14 of 20 , Mar 26, 2008
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                                You didn't say his name.
                                My family lived in Jackson County during that time as well. I know nothing of what their life was like or really which side they supported.
                                I am working on James R. BRYAN and his wife Susan DENMAN BRYAN. They lived in the Bridgeport area as well.


                                Jackie Morgan

                                Genealogist & Quilter

                                I hear ethereal whispers, persuasive, soft and still,
                                �Daughter, if you don�t remember us, who will?��




                                ----- Original Message ----
                                From: madolyn jysele <madolynjysele@...>
                                To: jacksongenealogy@yahoogroups.com
                                Sent: Wednesday, March 26, 2008 12:28:32 PM
                                Subject: [jacksongenealogy] Re: Union Troops from Jackson County

                                My Great Great Grandfather fought for the Union Army. He died at Bridgeport, Al - but he didn't die in battle he died of dysentery from digging ditches. The people of Jackson County did not take likely to a Union sympathizer. My Great Great Grandfather was stabbed at his home, the people burn't his home, then when they moved the stigma stayed with them. Every year they have a re-enactment of the war in Bridgeport, Al and we have a Fort here in Stevenson, Al called Fort Harker.

                                I also wanted to tell you that the Archives in Washington, Dc is a place to look for much information. My Great Great Grandmother filed so many papers right up to her death, I can read those papers and virtually live her life for many years. She even filed papers for a corn crop that was taken and she gave so much personal information that gave to me info I would not have normally had.

                                There were indeed Union soldiers from this area and they paid dearly from their neighbors... ...Madolyn

                                ------------ --------- --------- ---
                                Never miss a thing. Make Yahoo your homepage.

                                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]





                                ____________________________________________________________________________________
                                Never miss a thing. Make Yahoo your home page.
                                http://www.yahoo.com/r/hs

                                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                              • Chadwick Raines
                                Madolyn, Do you have any more info on the Union soldiers from Jackson Co? My husband s grandfather was in the Co I 8th Ind Calvary [Union] but we always
                                Message 15 of 20 , Mar 26, 2008
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                                  Madolyn,
                                  Do you have any more info on the Union soldiers from Jackson Co? My husband's grandfather was in the Co I 8th Ind Calvary [Union] but we always assumed he was forced to go with them. He was a Mashburn. Any info on the Union soldiers from J C would be appreciated. [how they were treated, etc]
                                  Barbara
                                  ----- Original Message -----
                                  From: madolyn jysele<mailto:madolynjysele@...>
                                  To: jacksongenealogy@yahoogroups.com<mailto:jacksongenealogy@yahoogroups.com>
                                  Sent: Wednesday, March 26, 2008 1:28 PM
                                  Subject: [jacksongenealogy] Re: Union Troops from Jackson County


                                  My Great Great Grandfather fought for the Union Army. He died at Bridgeport, Al - but he didn't die in battle he died of dysentery from digging ditches. The people of Jackson County did not take likely to a Union sympathizer. My Great Great Grandfather was stabbed at his home, the people burn't his home, then when they moved the stigma stayed with them. Every year they have a re-enactment of the war in Bridgeport, Al and we have a Fort here in Stevenson, Al called Fort Harker.

                                  I also wanted to tell you that the Archives in Washington, Dc is a place to look for much information. My Great Great Grandmother filed so many papers right up to her death, I can read those papers and virtually live her life for many years. She even filed papers for a corn crop that was taken and she gave so much personal information that gave to me info I would not have normally had.

                                  There were indeed Union soldiers from this area and they paid dearly from their neighbors......Madolyn


                                  ---------------------------------
                                  Never miss a thing. Make Yahoo your homepage.

                                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


                                  ------------------------------------

                                  Yahoo! Groups Links





                                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                                • mallen1239@aol.com
                                  check 1st Alabama -Tenn Independent Vidette Cal for Union soldiers In a message dated 3/26/2008 6:46:01 P.M. Central Daylight Time, car625@MSN.COM writes:
                                  Message 16 of 20 , Mar 27, 2008
                                  • 0 Attachment
                                    check 1st Alabama -Tenn Independent Vidette Cal for Union soldiers


                                    In a message dated 3/26/2008 6:46:01 P.M. Central Daylight Time,
                                    car625@... writes:




                                    Madolyn,
                                    Do you have any more info on the Union soldiers from Jackson Co? My
                                    husband's grandfather was in the Co I 8th Ind Calvary [Union] but we always assumed
                                    he was forced to go with them. He was a Mashburn. Any info on the Union
                                    soldiers from J C would be appreciated. [how they were treated, etc]
                                    Barbara
                                    ----- Original Message -----
                                    From: madolyn jysele<mailto:_madolynjysele@madolynjy_
                                    (mailto:madolynjysele@...) >
                                    To: _jacksongenealogy@jacksongeneajac_
                                    (mailto:jacksongenealogy@yahoogroups.com) <mailto:_jacksongenealogy@jacksongeneajac_
                                    (mailto:jacksongenealogy@yahoogroups.com) >
                                    Sent: Wednesday, March 26, 2008 1:28 PM
                                    Subject: [jacksongenealogy] Re: Union Troops from Jackson County

                                    My Great Great Grandfather fought for the Union Army. He died at Bridgeport,
                                    Al - but he didn't die in battle he died of dysentery from digging ditches.
                                    The people of Jackson County did not take likely to a Union sympathizer. My
                                    Great Great Grandfather was stabbed at his home, the people burn't his home,
                                    then when they moved the stigma stayed with them. Every year they have a
                                    re-enactment of the war in Bridgeport, Al and we have a Fort here in Stevenson, Al
                                    called Fort Harker.

                                    I also wanted to tell you that the Archives in Washington, Dc is a place to
                                    look for much information. My Great Great Grandmother filed so many papers
                                    right up to her death, I can read those papers and virtually live her life for
                                    many years. She even filed papers for a corn crop that was taken and she gave
                                    so much personal information that gave to me info I would not have normally
                                    had.

                                    There were indeed Union soldiers from this area and they paid dearly from
                                    their neighbors...There were

                                    ---------------------------------
                                    Never miss a thing. Make Yahoo your homepage.

                                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

                                    ------------------------------------

                                    Yahoo! Groups Links

                                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]







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                                    Home.
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                                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                                  • starry3731
                                    ... the union army during the Civil War? I was researching an uncle, John M. IRBY who served in the 1st Alabama Calvary according to some records I have
                                    Message 17 of 20 , Mar 28, 2008
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                                      --- In jacksongenealogy@yahoogroups.com, "Sylvia King" <kingirby@...>
                                      wrote:
                                      >
                                      > Does anyone have any information on Jackson County men serving in
                                      the union army during the Civil War? I was researching an uncle,
                                      John M. IRBY who served in the 1st Alabama Calvary according to some
                                      records I have found.
                                      > I have a tintype picture with the notation that he died about 1864
                                      in Fayetteville, Arkansas. Any information would be appreciated.
                                      > Sylvia Lacy King
                                      >
                                      > researching, Irby, Wallace in Jackson County.
                                      >
                                      >
                                      >
                                      >
                                      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                                      >
                                      My ggg-grandfather Jennings Pemberton was from the Valley Head area
                                      of Dekalb County. He was for the Union on the grounds that he thought
                                      that the Union would tend to be better to the poor people rather than
                                      oppress them like some of the more affluent southerners. After being
                                      pressured by the locals to choose sides, he was attacked stabbed, &
                                      was about to be hanged, & (as the story goes) he somehow got away &
                                      fled over the mountain to Jackson County where there suppossedly were
                                      alot of Unionist & enlisted in the 1st Alabama & Tennessee
                                      Independent Videdette Calvary U. S. A. He enlisted January 1, 1862
                                      There is information to be oredered through the NARA for civil war
                                      Claims & copies of applications of these claims, that you can get in
                                      order to receive a ton of genealogy information about how you family
                                      struggled through these times.
                                    • madolyn jysele
                                      My Great Great Grandfather was also Jennings Pemberton - he died at Bridgeport, al. He and his wife were first cousins. Any pemberton s or Bondurant s /
                                      Message 18 of 20 , Apr 6, 2008
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                                        My Great Great Grandfather was also Jennings Pemberton - he died at Bridgeport, al. He and his wife were first cousins. Any pemberton's or Bondurant's / Bundren Surname please contact me.

                                        Madolyn York
                                        P.O. Box 572
                                        Stevenson, Al 35772
                                        256-437-3493
                                        cell cingular 205-482-4053


                                        ---------------------------------
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