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Indian Villages

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  • Mike Cummons
    HILLABI. This Upper Creek town was on the left bank of Little Hillabi Creek, somewhat opposite Pinkneyville, near the Clay and Tallapoosa county line. In
    Message 1 of 9 , May 9, 1999
      HILLABI. This Upper Creek town was on the left bank of Little Hillabi
      Creek, somewhat opposite Pinkneyville, near the Clay and Tallapoosa county
      line. In 1540, DeSoto discovered a tribe of Hillabis living on the lower
      Savannah River in Georgia. It is quite possible that these Indians later
      migrated into Alabama. the trade regulations of July, 1761, showed the town
      with a population of 40 hunters. The town contained peach orchards and also
      livestock.

      During the Creek War of 1813-14, the Hillabis fought against the Tennessee
      militia at the battles of Tallahasseehatchee and Talladega. After the
      Indians were defeated in both encounters, a delegation of warriors went to
      General Jackson at Fort Strother asking for a termination of hostilities.
      Realizing that an expedition under General James White was at that moment on
      its way to Hillabi, Jackson attempted to halt the proposed attack, but
      unfortunately was too late.

      On November 18, 1813, General White surrounded the town, which contained 65
      wounded warriors who were hospitalized in the cabins there. No battle took
      place. The militiamen went into each cabin, bayoneting the wounded in their
      beds. The town was then burned. This needless action seriously hurt
      Jackson's reputation in the eyes of the friendly Indians, and is referred to
      in history as the "Hillabi Massacre.?

      to be continued.
      Georgia
    • Mike Cummons
      HOITHLEWALLI (Huhliwahli, Ulibahali, Olibahali, Cheeawoola, Telonalis Chevallis). For several centuries Indians lived at this site on the right bank of the
      Message 2 of 9 , May 10, 1999
        HOITHLEWALLI (Huhliwahli, Ulibahali, Olibahali, Cheeawoola, Telonalis
        Chevallis). For several centuries Indians lived at this site on the right
        bank of the Tallapoosa River, on a strip of land east of the influx of
        Mitchell's Creek (also known as Chubbehatchee Creek), extending back from
        the river for a mile, in Elmore County. On August 31, 1540, the DeSoto
        expedition reached this town and the Gentleman of Elvas wrote in his diary:
        "The Governor (DeSoto)) ordered all his men to enter the town which was
        enclosed and near which flowed a small river. The enclosure, like that in
        other towns seen there afterward, was of thick logs, set solidly close
        together in the ground, and many long poles as thick as an arm placed
        crosswise. The height of the enclosure was that of a good lance, and it was
        plastered within and without and had loopholes.

        SAUTA (Santa). This small Cherokee village was near the mouth of North
        Santa Creek, approximately 5 miles from Scottsboro, in Jackson County.
        Sauta was founded about 1784. Tradition states that Sequoyah first made
        known his new invention, the Cherokee alphabet, at Sauta. Later the
        Episcopal Mission School was established there.
      • Mike Cummons
        SAWANOGI (Petit Chaouanons, Sawanoki, Souvanoga). A Shawnee town situated on the south side of the Tallapoosa River, 2 miles above Likasa Creek. Sawanogi was
        Message 3 of 9 , May 12, 1999
          SAWANOGI (Petit Chaouanons, Sawanoki, Souvanoga). A Shawnee town situated
          on the south side of the Tallapoosa River, 2 miles above Likasa Creek.
          Sawanogi was near Ware's Ferry in Montgomery County. It was part of the
          Creek confederacy. the French census of 1760 listed the town as "Little
          Shawnees," a town located 3 leagues from Fort Toulouse, with a population
          of 50 warriors. The British trade regulations of 1761 stated that it
          contained only 30 hunters.

          In 1799, Benjamin Hawkins wrote that the inhabitants were industrious,
          worked in cornfields, and raised horses and hogs. The fields, he stated,
          were on both sides of the river. During the Creek War of 1813-14, Sawanogi
          was a Red Stick town. The antebellum historian, Pickett, said that it was
          the home of Savannah Jack, "the most blood-thirsty, fiendish and cruel white
          man that ever inhabited any country."

          to be continued.
          Georgia Mathis Cummons
          Jacksonville, FL
        • Mike Cummons
          SAWOKLI (Chaouakale, Chauakle, Sauwoogelo, Great Sawokli, Saukli, Chewakala). This Lower Creek town was on the west bank of the Chattahoochee River, just up
          Message 4 of 9 , May 12, 1999
            SAWOKLI (Chaouakale, Chauakle, Sauwoogelo, Great Sawokli, Saukli,
            Chewakala). This Lower Creek town was on the west bank of the Chattahoochee
            River, just up from the mouth of Hatchichubbee Creek, in Russell County.
            Sawokli first appeared on De Crenay's map in 1733. The French census of
            1760 listed the town as being 31 leagues from Fort Toulouse and containing a
            population of 50 men. In 1832, the town was under the control of 2
            chieftains and consisted of 56 families. the name appears in a variety of
            forms on old maps, but its meaning is "raccoon town."

            SUKA-ISPOKA (Suk-at-lspoka). This Upper Creek village was situated on the
            right bank of the Tallapoosa River, between Welch and Whaley ferries, 12
            miles upstream from Okfuski, in Tallapoosa County. The name of this village
            means "hog gathering place." Probably a branch of the Indian town of
            Okfuski, this village appeared on Mitchell's map in 1755. In the French
            census of 1760, it was listed along with Okfuski, the combined two having
            300 warriors. The British trade regulations of the following year showed it
            alone with 130 hunters. A white trader was killed in this village on May
            14, 1760. Benjamin Hawkins, in 1799, found but few inhabitants living in
            the village. He stated that the others had moved away to Imukfa.

            To be continued,
            Georgia
          • Mike Cummons
            TALATIGI (Kalalekis). the site of this Upper Creek town was within the present-day limits of Talladega, in Talladega County. the word Talatigi means
            Message 5 of 9 , May 15, 1999
              TALATIGI (Kalalekis). the site of this Upper Creek town was within the
              present-day limits of Talladega, in Talladega County. the word "Talatigi"
              means "border town". The French census of 1760 listed this town with a
              population of 30 warriors.

              In November, 1813, many friendly Creeks took refuge in Fort Lashley, which
              was erected at Talatigi. They were surrounded by 1,000 hostile Red Sticks,
              who demanded that they surrender. During the night, Selocta Chinnabee, a
              well-known scout, slipped out of the fort, dressed in a hog skin, crawled
              through the enemy line, and reached General Andrew Jackson at Fort Strother,
              telling of their plight. On November 9, Jackson's army, consisting of 1,200
              infantrymen and 800 cavalrymen, surrounded the enemy. A battle ensued in
              which 15 militiamen were killed. The bodies of 299 of the Red Sticks were
              later counted.

              TALI. This ancient village was on McKee's Island, in the Tennessee River,
              near Guntersville, in Marshall County. The site has been inundated by the
              river. On July 9, 1540, the chieftain of this village tried in vain to send
              the women and children across the river in canoes to safety after learning
              that Spanish soldiers under DeSoto were approaching. However, as Ranjel
              recorded on the occasion, "the Governor (DeSoto) forced them all to turn
              back." The chief was then forced to furnish DeSoto's party with canoes in
              order to enter the village.

              That's all I have on Indian Villages, when I can get back to the society
              where I found the book; I'll copy some more.

              Georgia Mathis Cummons
              Jacksonville, FL
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