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Re: [jacksongenealogy] (no subject)

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  • prm@hiwaay.net
    Thanks David, Scottsboro and some of Jackson County was the home of several federal loyalist before and during the war for certain, but as you implied many
    Message 1 of 35 , Mar 7 6:28 AM
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      Thanks David,

      Scottsboro and some of Jackson County was the home of several federal loyalist
      before and during the war for certain, but as you implied many slaves stayed
      loyal to their plantation families throughout the war. There was raised, in
      Scottsboro, a garrison of black union soldiers who tried to help defend the
      local encampment. I suppose those troops "volunteered" but there was probably
      some coersion also.

      Ms. Larkin probably had some first hand knowledge of the local union troops,
      they set up camp at Larkin's landing, on the Tennessee River for several months
      of the war.

      You spoke of "south of the river" as being a refuge. Just south of the river in
      Jackson County is Sand Mountain, a very large plateau that is some 800' higher
      than the river valley. It was rugged, wild mountain land that wasn't given up
      by the Cherokeee until the mid-1830's. To my knowledge, that portion of the
      county was never held by union forces at any point during the 5 year war. The
      union troops did travel across the mountain from Stevenson in large numbers in
      their preparation for the attack on Chattanooga. General Sherman himself had a
      good knowledge of Jackson County also having served on a military survey crew
      while a young officer in this area prior to the war.

      Richard

      Quoting malbuff@...:

      >
      >
      >
      > The union encampment was just north of the railroad tracks in a hilly
      > region
      > near the base of Tater knob and melody mountain. As long as I can
      > remeber,
      > this
      > part of town has contained the Black, African-American population of
      > our
      > town.
      > I wonder if the black people of our town moved near the union
      > encampment for
      > protection, during the war, and near left the area afterwards.
      >
      > By 1864, this may have been the case. But slaves didn't always
      > consider
      > the Union troops to be their liberators, nor were Union officers
      > particularly
      > keen on the idea of freeing the slaves.
      >
      > Early in the war the official US Army term for freed/escaped slaves
      > was
      > 'contrabands', and returns/exchanges frequently took place. Negroes who
      >
      > followed the Union army around were not particularly welcome, and
      > some generals had to issue orders prohibiting the inhumane treatment
      > of
      > escaped Negroes by their troops..
      >
      > Priscilla Larkin's diary entry of June 18, 1862, written from her home
      > in
      > Larkinsville after Union troops had seized Huntsville, reads in part:
      >
      > "Old Micheal (U.S. Gen. O .M. Mitchell) has published in the
      > HUNTSVILLE REVEILLE for all who(se) slaves ran away to
      > come & get them."
      >
      > From August 3, 1862, also at Larkinsville:
      >
      > "Poor darkies have been dodging from the Yanks as they are
      > out pressing negroes to build breast-works at Stephenson. They
      > called in this evening, whilst 'twas pouring down rain, to give a
      > receipt of the negroes they were taking from here... Oh: how I
      > felt
      > for some of the negroes, if they were condemned to be hung, they
      > would not have looked worse."
      >
      > She also makes frequent references to the practice of sending slaves
      > to safety south of the nearby Tennessee river, which the Union army
      > had not been able to cross in force..
      >
      > It may be that the Emancipation Proclamation, together with the
      > changing momentum of the War after July 1863, caused a shift in
      > attitude between slaves and the Union army. By 1864 it probably was
      > apparent to the slaves that the Federals were their best hope of
      > liberation, whereas early in the War they likely viewed the Yankees
      > the same as whites did-- as invaders. (Of course, I mean all this
      > in
      > a general sense; I know individual exceptions abounded.)
      >
      >
      > Glory to God,
      > David Malbuff
      > Strasburg, Virginia
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > Yahoo! Groups Links
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
    • Jewel Casey
      I haven t gotten the messages for quite some time now. Jewel ... From: Kathryn Swearingen To: jacksongenealogy@yahoogroups.com Sent: Monday, March 14, 2005
      Message 35 of 35 , Mar 19 5:04 PM
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        I haven't gotten the messages for quite some time now.
        Jewel
        ----- Original Message -----
        From: Kathryn Swearingen
        To: jacksongenealogy@yahoogroups.com
        Sent: Monday, March 14, 2005 8:52 PM
        Subject: Re: [jacksongenealogy] TEST


        I received your message. Thanks for all you do for us.
        Kathryn Holloway Swearingen

        clay gullatt wrote:

        > This is a test message. Some having not been
        > receiving any messages.
        >
        > Clay
        >
        >
        >
        > Yahoo! Groups Links
        >
        >
        >
        >



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