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Re: [jacksongenealogy] Agricultural Census

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  • Peggy Powell
    David, Loved hearing the story anytime you fell like going on about it I would love to hear it. I live down the road from Larkinsville. I live in Limrock and
    Message 1 of 41 , Jul 21, 2004
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      David,
      Loved hearing the story anytime you fell like going on about it I would love to hear it. I live down the road from Larkinsville. I live in Limrock and love hearing stories about the area. Thanks Peggy ptpowell@...
      ----- Original Message -----
      From: malbuff@...
      To: jacksongenealogy@yahoogroups.com
      Sent: Thursday, July 22, 2004 9:29 PM
      Subject: Re: [jacksongenealogy] Agricultural Census


      David Larkin (1795-1856) was my great-great-great-grandfather, the founder
      of Larkinsville, and one of the early settlers in the area. His family had
      come from the Shenandoah Valley of Virginia to southeastern Tennessee about
      1806 or so, and once he reached the age of majority he decided to strike out on
      his own into the (then) wilderness of northern Alabama.

      He established land and water trading posts (Larkin's Landing on the
      Tennessee River and Larkinsville, which became a stop on the Memphis & Charleston
      RR), and assumed control over a vast quantity of land after the Indians had
      been expelled. As you noticed in the census, he had 32,000 acres of land, or
      fifty miles square. It was said that one could wake in the morning on Larkin
      land, ride all day, and still be on Larkin land at sundown. I would
      suppose he had quite a few slaves, since 12,000 of those acres were reported
      as being in production.

      He and his wife Betsy Rutledge had nine children, seven of whom survived
      childhood, one of whom was my great-great-grandmother Priscilla Larkin.

      David Larkin died suddenly on the last day of 1856. He died intestate and
      left a huge fortune. His three sons had already been set up in business, and
      his two eldest daughters had married well, so Priscilla inherited the bulk of
      the estate, but not without difficulty. We have records of 'shirttail' kin
      trying to claim a piece of it. The matter was still being administered (by
      eldest son W.R. Larkin) when war broke out. My understanding is that the
      courthouse was burned during the conflict and all the records were destroyed, so they
      had to start all over again after the surrender.

      It appears his estate was finally settled about 1875. By then, Priscilla
      Larkin had married a traveling man and Confederate veteran, Absolom Stephens,
      and had died at age 29 from complications after childbirth. At least some of
      the proceeds went to her son, my great-grandfather, William Larkin Stephens,
      who went to Cumberland College, got a law degree, and was a Judge in Bridgeport
      during the '90s. He owned land in the area as well, but eventually sold it
      and removed to Washington, D.C., about 1900.

      The Larkin plantation, west of Larkinsville itself, is long gone, they tell
      me. The great house was used as a Union hospital after the Federals occupied
      the area in 1862. It was so disease-ridden when Priscilla got it back that she
      and her family had it burned down. They rebuilt near the same spot, but
      obviously never recovered all their land or wealth. About 1910 David Larkin's
      remaining grandchildren moved from Larkinsville to Scottsboro, and for all I
      know their descendants are still there today.

      I could go on (I do go on, don't I?) but perhaps if you would e-mail me
      directly I could give you more information.

      I have to put in a word of thanks here to Judge William Page of Huntsville.
      Some of you folks likely know him, and he has assisted me a great deal in my
      Larkin research.



      Glory to God,

      David Malbuff
      Strasburg, Virginia



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    • Richard Crowe
      My great-great grandmother Mrs. Mary WEBB married George Washington KEY in Jackson County, AL 1869. I do not know her maiden name nor do I have any information
      Message 41 of 41 , Feb 5, 2005
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        My great-great grandmother Mrs. Mary WEBB married George Washington
        KEY in Jackson County, AL 1869. I do not know her maiden name nor do
        I have any information on her former husband named WEBB.
        Her son, my great-grandfather George C. (Clemons, Clemmons or
        Clemens) KEY was born in MS 1862.

        1870 Census - Jackson County, AL
        George W. KEY, 45,m, wood chopper, B:1825, AL
        Mary, 36, f, 36, B: 1834 Tenn.
        George C. 8, m, B: 1862, Miss.

        I know nothing else about Mary WEBB-KEY except that she was still
        living with George Washington KEY in Jackson County, AL in 1900 and
        were not on the 1910 Census
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